Change search
Refine search result
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    A Lewinian approach to managing barriers to university–industry collaboration2019In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management and industry to increase university–industry (U–I) collaboration to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too complex to be tackled within one sector alone. Researchers are often expected to realise these ideas, but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers to accomplishing this. The paper presents an empirical study of researchers’ view on U–I collaboration. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers to collaboration from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study, which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on U–I collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we discuss hindering forces on the individual, intra- and interorganisational levels. In total, we find 18 key areas to identify possible hinders for collaboration and based on a Lewinian perspective, we suggest that removing hindering forces can benefit U–I collaboration. The paper recognises the need to regard universities as equal partners in U–I collaboration for sustainable knowledge production.

  • 2.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Barriers to managing knowledge and learning in university: Industry cooperation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management, and industry to increase university–industry cooperation to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too large and complex to be tackled within one sector alone. These actors want to stimulate knowledge development and learning in university – industry cooperation to achieve innovation and growth. Researchers are often expected to take charge for realizing these ideas but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers for doing this. In this paper, we present an empirical study of researchers’ view on university – industry cooperation. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers for cooperation from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on cooperation and collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we also find other hindering forces related to person-task fit, identity, career and resources. These barriers are found on the individual and societal level, in addition to the previous two categories that are on the organizational level.

  • 3.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Horizontal structures – A fundamental and forgotten perspective in school governance?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Engagement and co-creation of knowledge – the important role of workshops for data collection and analysis2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper complements current literature on qualitative methods and collaborative research approaches by addressing workshops as a unique way of not only collecting data, but also allow for joint analysis and conceptualizations. We have applied a grounded, data-driven approach based on retrospective analysis of the content of 40 workshops in four different collaborative research projects. This paper contributes to a better understanding for workshops and their role in data collection, data analysis and conceptualization as well as other non-research-process related activities in collaborative research projects.

  • 5.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Overcoming Contradictions through Cross-functional Integration in an ETO-context2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    The lead time tree as a boundary object for developmental learning and improved conditions for purchasers2016In: 5th World P&OM Conference Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contradictions between individuals and different functions in organizations can serve asbasis for a constant challenge which, as it gets responded to and demand is fulfilled, canhelp people to develop and create viable organizations. (Argyris, 1990). Thesecontradictions, handled in an effective way drives, empowers and enables developmentin organizations. In order to get interdisciplinary functions to collaborate collectivelyboundary objects can be useful (Star and Griesemer, 1989). The purpose is toinvestigate if the lead time tree (Bäckstrand, 2012) can be used as a boundary object tosupport knowledge creation process across functional boundaries of purchasing,manufacturing, product development, sales etc.

  • 7.
    Elvnäs, Simon
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Carter, Ned
    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leading production and innovation2017In: WORK2017 - Work and Labour in the Digital Future 2017: Abstracts, Turku: University of Turku , 2017, p. 126-128Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Arbetsmöten: Arenor för samspel och lärande2016In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 283-305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Effective interaction in organisations2019In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] H. Ahl, I. Bergmo Prvulovic & K. Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2019, p. 30-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating effective interaction and ‘organisational learning’ is a skill that must be developed. Research from work meetings in a manufacturing company found that meetings for well-defined, technical assignments often went smoothly and produced the desired results, but there was a lack of forums to discuss developmental issues, especially those concerning work organisation. Furthermore, there was a lack of communication between the different work groups. Discrepancies were swept under the carpet, which is unfortunate, since they provide opportunities for learning and development. To achieve this, a goal-directed meeting structure and proper leadership and communications skills are needed.

  • 10.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Effectiveness in meetings. Groups dealing with ambidexterity dilemma2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambidexterity dilemma, exploitation/exploration, in organizations causes groups trouble in dealing with their tasks during work meetings. The study concludes that the two logics need to be separated in time and space conducted with various communicative actions, to become whole and integrated in the minds of individuals and groups.

  • 11.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Effektivt samspel i organisationer2017In: HR: Att ta tillvara mänskliga resurser / [ed] Helene Ahl, Ingela Bergmo Prvulovic & Karin Kilhammar, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 45-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande.
    Lärande samspel för effektivitet: En studie av arbetsgrupper i ett mindre industriföretag2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Important arenas for interaction on critical interfaces (sales – design – production) in industrial firms are the various meetings where groups come together around a common task. The purpose of this dissertation is to contribute knowledge about the interactions that occur within and between work groups in their handling of their tasks in small industrial companies (SME’s) and the significance of these interactions on learning and effectiveness. The thesis focuses especially on the following questions: 1. What characterizes the interaction within and between work groups as they are expressed in various meetings? 2. What factors facilitate and hinder the interaction within and between work groups? 3. What are the consequences of different kinds of interaction regarding learning and effectiveness in work groups and in organizations? The study takes a critical realistic perspective on learning in organizations and is based on previous studies on learning, communication and effectiveness in groups and organisations. The study was conducted during 2008-2010 and used a qualitative and interactive approach. The collection of data was based on interviews, observations of video filmed meetings and on questionnaires. The analysis moves between two levels: interaction within groups and between groups at an organizational level. The interactions within and between groups were analysed based on contextual factors in order to understand whether different communication patterns were related to different types of learning and effectiveness. A rationalistic concept of effectiveness was challenged in favour of a humanistic approach where learning is an important aspect. Three major conclusions were drawn: Effectiveness presupposes that patterns of communication and management are tailored to the task at hand – performance or development. Feedback and links between groups need revision and steering to facilitate interaction. Discrepancies (contradictions, conflicts and disturbances) that are made visible in the organization may lead to development. Those remaining in the hidden disturb the performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 13.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Organizational learning in cross-functional teams. A study of a small manufacturing company2011In: Making Waves, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Påverkansprocesser i vuxnas lärande: kritiska händelser i en reflektionsgrupp2007Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Separate to integrate the task as a whole in work meetings?: Two types of learning hindering each other – the duality between execution and development of the same task2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many organizations have difficulties finding the necessary balance between execution and development of the same task. The phenomenon causes conflicting demands on an organization’s resources and can be identified as ambidexterity. In practice, the ambidexterity dilemma has been seen in the discussion of work meetings, which in some situations not are as effective as expected. Even if there has been a lot of research on the ambidexterity dilemma there are still a lack of studies on internal processes during interactions in work meetings (micro practices) according to different tasks. The purpose of this article is to explore how interaction during work meetings can be organized and managed in order to improve work meetings and stimulate learning for ambidexterity when dealing with the duality between the execution and development of a task. The overall question to be answered is – How can the execution and development of a task become an integrated part of the learning processes of individuals and groups? As theoretical framework Dewey’s and Ellströms theories of learning is used as a filter when analysing the interaction in video filmed meeting in an industry. The results indicate that execution and development are two different, equally important logics, in agreement with previous research. This study indicates that the two logics might need to be separated in time and space to become integrated in the minds of individuals and groups. The duality between execution and development becomes a whole when the same people are dealing with both dimensions of the task. The way an organization can meet human power is to ensure that people in the organization get involved in both execution and development but at different times and in different spaces to avoid the two logics interfering with each other.

  • 16.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Teams effectiveness in small medium sized manufacturing company2011In: Making Waves, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Barry, Daved
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs2019In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2019, article id 14906Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational Ambidexterity (OA)–the ability to simultaneously pursue exploration and exploitation–is increasingly being advocated as a way to gain competitive advantage. Most of the work on OA has focused on large, multi-divisional organizations, resulting in frameworks and prescriptions that have little utility for small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). With this in mind, we report on the first year of an exploratory, quasi-experimental study of ambidexterity within six small-to-medium manufacturing enterprises in Sweden. The research is characterized by an emic, ‘invented here’ approach, where companies closely examine their current exploration and exploitation practices, use their findings to formulate more advanced OA approaches uniquely suited to their values and circumstances, and iteratively apply and refine these over a four year period. It appears that the construct of ‘unplanned’ and associated sub-constructs such as ‘disturbance, crashes, and interruption’ could be an important key to framing and improving OA within these SMEs and perhaps more generally.

  • 18.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Effectual learning in SME’s to promote transformation instead of frustration: Towards a design of an intervention study2016In: The 4th Effectuation Conference, Bodø, June 5-7, 2016., The Society for Effectual Action , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Working meetings and inspiration for learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Early steps in learning about organizational learning in customization settings: A communication perspective2019In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to empirically investigate the role of learning for suppliers of individualized customizations from a communication perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach: Five companies providing individualized customizations are investigated through an in-depth qualitative approach. The empirical material is based on data from five presentations in one workshop and seven interviews.

    Findings: Four important categories of communication processes between suppliers and customers that stimulate learning were identified: the identification and confirmation of existing knowledge, the identification of knowledge gaps and the creation of new knowledge, the definition of relations and procedures and evaluation and learning.

    Practical implications: These findings can help suppliers of individualized customizations become aware of the important role of organizational learning in their day-to-day operations and the value of improving as a learning organization.

    Originality/value: This cross-disciplinary study brings together organizational learning and customization research. It is a study that focuses on communication in customization tasks as a base for learning. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 21.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Learning to make a difference in customization settings2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Lundin, Mona
    Personalvetenskapliga perspektiv på kommunikation2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Identifying scenarios for ambidextrous learning in a decoupling thinking context2017In: / [ed] Hermann Lödding, Ralph Riedel, Klaus-Dieter Thoben, Gregor von Cieminski, Dimitris Kiritsis, Springer, 2017, p. 320-327Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human perspective and the flow perspective of businesses represent two areas of competence that study similar systems but with different frame of references. The human perspective involves ambidextrous learning that concerns how knowledge is developed and used for different purposes by individuals or groups of individuals. The development of knowledge for new situations is referred to as ‘exploration’, while ‘exploitation’ refers to execution in known and stable contexts. Furthermore, decoupling thinking is important from a flow perspective and concerns how a value-delivery package is created. This type of thinking decouples the flow perspective into segments with different characteristics that are significant for process management. The examples presented in this paper are distinctive drivers of flow in terms of speculation or commitment, and the level of customisation. By combining these two perspectives, a set of 15 scenarios is identified for further research on ambidextrous learning in a decoupling thinking context.

  • 24.
    Johansson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Effectual learning in SME’s – activities promoting transformation in place of frustration2016In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange Conference 2016: Conference proceedings / [ed] Per Davidsson, Queensland University of Technology, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes its starting point in an empirical problem, to which we believe current research have difficulties offering operational solutions. The root of the problem lies in the tensions between the common held expectations of small firms (SMEs) to contribute to society’s growth and innovation – and the different factors which makes such accomplishment challenging, including lack of time and the need to master different skills. Upon adding uncertainty with regards to goal definition; information scarcity or overflow and the pressure to manage an ever-changing market, this triggers frustration at instances where innovative action is needed the most.

    The paper builds upon the idea that human interaction result in learning that either transforms or reproduces the processes involved. This relates back to the ideas of an organization’s need to explore new as well as exploit existing products and processes. The challenge for SMEs to deal with these both types of learning – and ultimately release innovative capacity – is at the core of this paper. We find that nature of the problem; degree of complexity and level of competence in the problem area are all important determinants for the chosen activities which also relates to the fit with the effectual learning processes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Johansson, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    McKelvie, Alexander
    Syracuse University.
    An In-depth Investigation of Employee-driven Innovation2016In: 36th Babson College Entrepreneurship Conference, Bodø, June 8-11, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Principal topic

     This paper is direct the focus on the potential of employees to contribute to innovation, regardless their position in the company – a practice and research stream we know as employee driven innovation (EDI) (Kristiansen & Bloch‐Poulsen, 2010). More specifically, we study the effects of using an online platform to motivate and track employee driven activities. We use a unique dataset of close to 500 employee driven activities responding to the overall strategic goals of a large pharmaceutical retail chain in Sweden.

    It goes without saying that expertise, experience, ideas, creativity and skills among employees are valuable resources in the company’s innovation work (Høyrup, 2010) and support achievement of competitive advantages (Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010). EDI include acting on your own ideas and not only respond to needs of the organization (Lovén, 2013), furthermore EDI includes both bottom‐up and top‐down perspectives on innovation (Høyrup, Bonnafous‐Boucher, Hasse, Lotz, & Møller, 2012). The presence of EDI is dependent on mechanisms that influence the organisation’s innovation capabilities (Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010). Dominant mechanisms include fundamental determinants of work engagement known from motivational research, such as the need for autonomy, competence and relatedness (Hakanen & Roodt, 2010; Mauno, Kinnunen, & Ruokolainen, 2007) but also feedback and the possibility of seeing one’s own part in the bigger picture (Hackman & Oldham, 1980).

    Amundsen et al. (2014) who suggest that important factors for stimulating EDI include leader support through the generation, registration, evaluation and realisation of ideas; a collaborative climate including interactions between colleagues and between employees and external contacts; rendering autonomy and delegation of decision‐making authority to employees. Research has also highlighted several restraining forces for EDI, such as the gap between management and employees and the fact that managers are not capable of seeing the things that employees meet in their daily work (Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010).

    Despite the vast knowledge relating to motivational theory, social comparison and social facilitation surprisingly few studies examine how this knowledge could be combined and successfully be put to practice to promote EDI. The focus on the majority of work has been on investigating restraining and enabling factors of EDI (Aaltonen & Hytti, 2014; Kesting & Parm Ulhøi, 2010), exploring how EDI occurs in teams (Kristiansen & Bloch‐Poulsen, 2010) and small organizations (Aaltonen & Hytti, 2014). As a result of this, we know a lot about what need to be accomplished to promote EDI, but we do not know what tools work or not to reach those accomplishments. In particular, we know little about how this could take place in large organizations where people are spread geographically.

    By drawing upon knowledge from social cognitive theory (Bandura, 2001) showing that strong perceived collective efficacy increase people’s aspirations and motivations, we analyze the outcomes from a year-long strategic work at a large pharmaceutical retail chain in Sweden. This takes shape in a database consisting of detailed information on close to 500 employee-driven activities in a large pharmaceutical retail chain in Sweden. Social cognitive theory extends the conception of human agency to collective agency (Bandura 1997) where people’s shared belief in their collective power is a key ingredient

    Method

    We use a unique data set of close to 500 employee-driven activities entered in a cloud-based, online database. The database was used as a means to active the employees at the 370 retail units in an organizational change project launched earlier the same year. The project started off with 32 physical dialogue meetings between the CEO and the retail unit staff where the overall strategic goals were presented and discussed. Ambassadors in management positions were appointed at each retail unit, responsible to encourage, initiate and document the activities rendered by the employees. The online database allowed for constant transparency between the retail units – giving the possibility to share ones ideas and experiences, mistakes and successes throughout the whole year while the project was running. The database consist of secondary data, as we did not intervene in the creation or execution of the project. Same thing goes for the written evaluation made after the project was completed – where employees were asked about their impressions and experiences from using the database. 

    The retailing business is highly competitive and the geographical spread of employees makes it a suitable context to explore the use of online tools of this kind for promoting EDI in other large businesses or smaller businesses geographically spread.  

    We used mainly qualitative analysis methods to explore the database as well as simple quantitative analysis to produce frequencies and descriptive data. By coding each activity according to the degree of innovativeness and type of activity (e.g. internal process, customer service) we could form a good understanding of the outcomes from using the database.

    Results and implications

    Our study of the database and the subsequent employee evaluation form reveals interesting and uplifting results. For example, 64 % said the online tool helped them better understand the overall strategy and 85 % were happy with the user interface and continuous work with the tool. Also, half of the retail outlets claimed the tool helped them run projects which increased sales considerably. Among the more successful activities were one initiating earlier opening hours (which previously was attempted to be pushed up-down without success) – this activity alone corresponded to the average turnover of 22 outlets. 

    The result are in line with social comparison and social facilitation theory, showing how public praise and social comparison seem to improve employee driven innovation motivation (Mumm and Mutlu (2001). Although comparative studies are hard to find (we did not) similar findings were made in the use of mobile exercise applications. A recent study by Hamari and Koivisto, 2015) shows that social influence, positive recognition and reciprocity have a positive impact on how much people are willing to exercise.  In fact, the more “friends” a user the larger the effects were, which could explain the success of the online tool in this study – which involved the exposure among more than 300 outlets.  Our findings, similar to Hamari and Koivisto (2015), further our understanding on the phenomenon of social influence showing, how public recognition and network effects contribute to the collective employee-driven innovation.

  • 26.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Viskleken2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Allt fler företag upplever krav på kundanpassning av produkter men för att få nöjda kunder är en förutsättning att förstå vad kunder verkligen vill ha. Kundanpassade produkter förknippas ofta med små serier och kundernas beställningar innehåller olik information för varje order. För företag som erbjuder kundanpassningar kan kundkraven representeras av ”kundorderspecifik information” (KOSI) som inkluderar när, var och vad kunden vill ha. Att fånga dessa parametrar kan vara svårt då ordern ofta skiljer sig från andra. KOSI är inte bara svårt att fånga, när den kommuniceras eller överlämnas mellan individer, avdelningar eller olika informationssystem kan den lätt förvanskas, medvetet eller omedvetet, vilket kan liknas vid en visklek. När meddelandet nått den sista mottagaren är det ofta väsentligt annorlunda mot det som ursprungligen sändes. Dynamiken i denna process kan ses som ”kundorderspecifik kommunikation” (KOSK), dvs den kundorderspecifika informationens överföringsprocess. Syftet med pappret är således att skapa en konceptuell, teoretisk modell kring hur begreppen information och kommunikation förhåller sig till varandra i ETO-kontexter samt diskutera hur vidare forskning på området kan utformas.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 27.
    Sollander, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    A framework for task-based ambidexterity in manufacturing SMEs2018In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management for Data-Driven, Intelligent, Collaborative, and Sustainable Manufacturing. APMS 2018. / [ed] Moon I., Lee G., Park J., Kiritsis D., von Cieminski G., Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 535, p. 518-525Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be competitive, it is important for companies to create a breeding ground for innovation without jeopardizing productivity. The challenge posed by industrial companies and the innovation research community is how to promote innovation while achieving efficient execution. The ability to balance execution and innovation is referred to as organizational ambidexterity (OA), which includes several dimensions, concepts and approaches where a central task can be identified. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what consequences result from different dimensions of a task in relation to the types of its actions, and their effects on OA. The focus of the task is firstly investigated, followed by the development of nine scenarios via combining the designers’ and the performers’ perspectives of the task. A brief analysis of the scenarios indicates that there is no single optimal scenario; rather, the scenarios represent different states that are appropriate for certain conditions, and dynamic adaptation should be encouraged in relation to the changing conditions. This type of dynamics is particularly expected to prevail in small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) because the roles that are responsible for tasks in these organizations are less specialized. Therefore, SMEs must define tasks that include both explorative and exploitative parts, either simultaneously or sequentially, to stimulate employees to work ambidextrously and thereby develop the concept of task-based ambidexterity.

1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf