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  • 1.
    Avby, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, Ingela
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Fabisch, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Shaping leadership development systems to the work context2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper seeks to identify patterns of leadership development in different organization contexts with the aim of contributing to improved understanding of how the context shapes the leadership development system (LDS).

    Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the initial phase of a 4-year collaborative research project on LDSs. Data was collected in the five collaborative partner organizations and based on four data sources: 1) company visits; 2) internal documentation; 3) external information (websites); and 4) company presentations at an on-line workshop.

    Findings: The results show a strong focus on individual leader development, and at least partly, confirms the under-use of developmental assignments and relationships as shown in previous studies. All organizations outsource leadership development to different degrees. However, leadership development is not only structured through different methods, it is also dependent on the organization context in the form of leader forums and meetings. An identified pattern is that the smaller organizations are more dependent on external resources, and the larger organizations tailor company-wide programs for their unique needs together with external consultants. Furthermore, the LDS is believed to be an effective change agent in the adaptive process of transforming.

    Originality: This study contributes to the research on leadership development by advancing the current understanding of how leadership development interacts with the context of the organization.

    Practical implications: This study highlights the need for leaders and HR professionals to acknowledge contextual issues when choosing practices used for developing the leadership in the organization.

  • 2.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, Ingela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Avby, Gunilla
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fabisch, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Exploring Social Representations of Leadership Development: Designing for Work-Integrated Learning2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, Ingela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Avby, Gunilla
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Stockholm University.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fabisch, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Exploring Social Representations of Leadership Development: Designing for Work-Integrated Learning2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 83-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explored social representations of leadership and leadership development shaping an organizations leadership development system (LDS). This study is based on the initial phase of a 4-year collaborative research project on LDSs, adopting an interactive research approach to co-produce knowledge through joint meetings and learning workshops (Ellström et al., 2020). The research project involves researchers from different disciplines, and five organizations operating in different business domains. The participating organizations vary in terms of size, strategies, markets, processes, products, and ways of organizing, but they all share a common interest in how to develop sustainable approaches to leadership development. An LDS encompasses all the metho ds and practices in an organization that contribute to developing and producing effective leaders (McCauley et al 2010). The importance of understanding the characteristics of the context the LDS is embedded in has been highlighted in a previous study (Avby et al., 2022), and serve as a point-of-reference in this study. However, less is known of what underlying assumptions an LDS is based upon. This study paid attention to the underlying values, ideas, and perspectives on leadership and leadership development that shape an organizations’ ways of thinking, communicating, and acting in the LDS. We suggest that the potential to develop a more deliberate practice of leadership development was enhanced by exploring and articulating the tacit knowledge and assumpt ions that an LDS rests upon.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore how socially and contextually shaped assumptions on leadership and leadership development can be visualized and practically applied to develop the leadership in the organization. The question addressed was how the awareness of underlying assumptions can support the methods and practices applied, and in what way the disclosing of underlying ideas, values and practices may foster work -integrated learning?

    Design and methods

    From a social representation theory approach (Moscovici, 2001, Jovchelovitch, 2007, Markova, 2003, BergmoPrvulovic, 2015), underlying assumptions of leadership and leadership development were explored. In the collaborative project an initial mapping of the participating organizations’ LDSs has been co nducted, based on different sources of data. The results of this mapping have been presented through a metaphorical analysis (Avby et al., 2022), in which the participating organizations are described with certain metaphors of their LDS. This study paid specific attention to the organization entitled The Self-Managing Team, and added to the initial stage of mapping LDSs by exploring the underlying assumptions that underpins the expressions and formulations on leadership and leadership development found in the organization’s documents, websites, formulations in meetings and strategies. The exploration of social representations of LDSs was based upon the free association method (Abric, 1995), further developed, and used in studies exploring social representations of similar abstract and complex phenomena, such as career (Bergmo-Prvulovic, 2013: 2015). The method consists of questions, words and series of words given to the respondents who spontaneously write down their immediate associations towards a specific concept and complex phenomenon with a gradual deepening of questions related to specific words, series of words. In this study, a digital enquiry was created in Esmaker. The enquiry was designed to ask for respondents spontaneous, immediate thoughts on words, and series of words related to leadership and leadership development. The gradually deepening of questions, were designed by paying attention to the five dimensions of representations suggested by Jovchelovitch (2007), by exploring who are concerned, why and for what leadership is needed, what is the content 84 of leadership, when it works and doesn’t work, when and how it occurs as well who is responsible, whose engagement and what conditions are needed. This study was based on 19 respondents’ answers a ll member in the Self-Managing Team. They were selected by the organization, as identified having important roles and functions in the company’s LDS. A facilitator in the organization introduced an online enquiry with 12 questions, given one by one to the respondents, providing 1-2 minutes for each. The respondents wrote down their associations to each question, some background data, and questions about leadership identity. The analytical procedure was made according to qualitative content analysis method as the basic procedure of qualitatively exploring social representations (Bergmo-Prvulovic, 2013; 2015). Expressions were numbered with a certain code for each respondent related to each answered question, thereafter each textual units were condensed, meaning units were coded and grouped into constitutive elements that builds up preliminary and primary themes generating a web of social representations of LDS for the group of respondents.

    Preliminary results

    The results disclosed a web of underlying social representations shaping the LDS in The Self-Managing Team. The social representations shape a basic, contextually characterized system of values, ideas, and practices, on which the company at present form their LDS. Given the collaborative design of the project, the results were fed back to the organization to validate the analytical procedure, as well as to support the designing for work -integrated learning and further knowledge use in the organization. The results revealed the respondents’ assumptions on leadership, leadership development, and self-leadership. These assumptions are clearly anchored in the organization’s aim to build in self-management, as a collective way of working with leadership. However, the existing knowledge base encloses both commonalities and contradictions that needs to be further highlighted to create a sustainable LDS. Results showed both stable representations, that occur repeatedly throughout the material, and dynamic social rep resentations, that express a negotiating character between different views, or as being antinomies of thoughts. By identifying and raising awareness of ambiguities deriving from the results, a base of designing for reflective work-integrated learning was provided. A joint learning process to discuss how the results could be utilized as a tool for work-integrated learning was initiated. Some challenges were recognized, and the organization especially addressed the need to work with a second step of workplace reflection. A first learning cycle was initiated to be continuously developed by involving the employees in the process. In all, the contribution of the study explains the basis of leadership development practice, which unnoticed might create ambiguity in service delivery. The mapping of social representations of an LDS can be utilized as a tool for a more deliberate leadership development practice and highlight possibilities and challenges that need to be addressed for integrating methods and practices in everyday work.

  • 4.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    A Lewinian approach to managing barriers to university–industry collaboration2019In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management and industry to increase university–industry (U–I) collaboration to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too complex to be tackled within one sector alone. Researchers are often expected to realise these ideas, but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers to accomplishing this. The paper presents an empirical study of researchers’ view on U–I collaboration. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers to collaboration from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study, which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on U–I collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we discuss hindering forces on the individual, intra- and interorganisational levels. In total, we find 18 key areas to identify possible hinders for collaboration and based on a Lewinian perspective, we suggest that removing hindering forces can benefit U–I collaboration. The paper recognises the need to regard universities as equal partners in U–I collaboration for sustainable knowledge production.

  • 5.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Barriers to managing knowledge and learning in university: Industry cooperation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management, and industry to increase university–industry cooperation to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too large and complex to be tackled within one sector alone. These actors want to stimulate knowledge development and learning in university – industry cooperation to achieve innovation and growth. Researchers are often expected to take charge for realizing these ideas but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers for doing this. In this paper, we present an empirical study of researchers’ view on university – industry cooperation. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers for cooperation from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on cooperation and collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we also find other hindering forces related to person-task fit, identity, career and resources. These barriers are found on the individual and societal level, in addition to the previous two categories that are on the organizational level.

  • 6.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Horizontal structures – A fundamental and forgotten perspective in school governance?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Horizontal structures – A fundamental but forgotten perspective for superintendents in school governance?2020In: Re-centering the critical potential of Nordic school leadership research: Fundamental, but often forgotten perspectives / [ed] L. Moos, E. Nihlfors, & J. M. Paulsen, Cham: Springer, 2020, p. 107-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is of fundamental importance that school superintendents engage in the vertical dimension of school governance within the national education system, but have these vertical structures been given too much attention, to the detriment of horizontal organisational structures? The chapter is based on material collected at a workshop where 52 Swedish school superintendents were in attendance. A conclusion is that superintendents are faced by fields of tension in both the vertical and the horizontal dimension of organisational structures. Three types of tensions were identified in relation to: (i) administrative questions, (ii) the students’ experiences, and (iii) organisational units. It is furthermore suggested that the superintendents see themselves to be the ‘victims’ of these tensions. We introduce the concept of ‘unmanaged spaces’ to address the need for competence to act in a constructive and responsible manner to diffuse the above-mentioned tensions. Our hypothesis is that far too narrow a focus on line management and governance documents has resulted in superintendents who are unable to properly manage collaboration in complex situations. This state of affairs is somewhat worrying in a government agency that is expected to be essential to democracy and should pursue ways of working where coordination and collaboration are fundamental.

  • 8.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Reflektioner om distansmöten [text och video]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Vad lär vi oss (inte) i top-down processer? [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, Ingela
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Higher education as learning organizations – An empirical study of education managers perception of their work situation2022In: NFF 2022 Conference Papers, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a study of Swedish academic leaders’ perception of their work situation. The aim was to explore the conditions which can enable creativity and learning in higher education institutions. The KEYS survey was sent to a sample of 64 university managers from social sciences, humanities and technical departments at Swedish universities. The response rate was 39 % (n25). The result indicates that education managers perceive a lack of feedback from upper management, but at the same time, they claim to have a high level of trust from upper management.

  • 11.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Engagement and co-creation of knowledge – the important role of workshops for data collection and analysis2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper complements current literature on qualitative methods and collaborative research approaches by addressing workshops as a unique way of not only collecting data, but also allow for joint analysis and conceptualizations. We have applied a grounded, data-driven approach based on retrospective analysis of the content of 40 workshops in four different collaborative research projects. This paper contributes to a better understanding for workshops and their role in data collection, data analysis and conceptualization as well as other non-research-process related activities in collaborative research projects.

  • 12.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Overcoming Contradictions through Cross-functional Integration in an ETO-context2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    The lead time tree as a boundary object for developmental learning and improved conditions for purchasers2016In: 5th World P&OM Conference Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contradictions between individuals and different functions in organizations can serve asbasis for a constant challenge which, as it gets responded to and demand is fulfilled, canhelp people to develop and create viable organizations. (Argyris, 1990). Thesecontradictions, handled in an effective way drives, empowers and enables developmentin organizations. In order to get interdisciplinary functions to collaborate collectivelyboundary objects can be useful (Star and Griesemer, 1989). The purpose is toinvestigate if the lead time tree (Bäckstrand, 2012) can be used as a boundary object tosupport knowledge creation process across functional boundaries of purchasing,manufacturing, product development, sales etc.

  • 14.
    Dybelius, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Historieämnets betydelse för bildning och lärande senare i livet [video]2021Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I samband med Encells 20-årsjubileum hölls ett seminarium med titeln 'Livslångt lärande för välbefinnande, mångfald och delaktighet'. Programmet spelades in och här hittar du fjärde delen, där Anders Dybelius talar om historieämnets betydelse för bildning och lärande senare i livet.

  • 15.
    Dybelius, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    När kunskapen gick från generation till generation [video]2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Anders Dybelius, lektor i historia vid Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation i Jönköping, berättar om teknikutvecklingen genom historien och hur kunskap och hantverkskunnande lärdes ut till nästa generation.

  • 16.
    Dybelius, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Svf Morgonstudio 28 april [video]2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Anders Dybelius, lektor i historia vid Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation i Jönköping, berättar om varför vi firar valborg.

  • 17.
    Elvnäs, Simon
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Carter, Ned
    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leading production and innovation2017In: WORK2017 - Work and Labour in the Digital Future 2017: Abstracts, Turku: University of Turku , 2017, p. 126-128Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Arbetsmöten: Arenor för samspel och lärande2016In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 283-305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Att lära för kollektiv insikt [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Effective interaction in organisations2019In: Human resource management: A Nordic perspective / [ed] H. Ahl, I. Bergmo Prvulovic & K. Kilhammar, London, UK: Routledge, 2019, p. 30-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating effective interaction and ‘organisational learning’ is a skill that must be developed. Research from work meetings in a manufacturing company found that meetings for well-defined, technical assignments often went smoothly and produced the desired results, but there was a lack of forums to discuss developmental issues, especially those concerning work organisation. Furthermore, there was a lack of communication between the different work groups. Discrepancies were swept under the carpet, which is unfortunate, since they provide opportunities for learning and development. To achieve this, a goal-directed meeting structure and proper leadership and communications skills are needed.

  • 21.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Effectiveness in meetings. Groups dealing with ambidexterity dilemma2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambidexterity dilemma, exploitation/exploration, in organizations causes groups trouble in dealing with their tasks during work meetings. The study concludes that the two logics need to be separated in time and space conducted with various communicative actions, to become whole and integrated in the minds of individuals and groups.

  • 22.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Effektivt samspel i organisationer2017In: HR: Att ta tillvara mänskliga resurser / [ed] Helene Ahl, Ingela Bergmo Prvulovic & Karin Kilhammar, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 45-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Innovationsförmåga – en fråga om mognad och självkännedom? [bloggpost]2021Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Jakten på perfektion kontraproduktivt [bloggpost]2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande.
    Lärande samspel för effektivitet: En studie av arbetsgrupper i ett mindre industriföretag2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Important arenas for interaction on critical interfaces (sales – design – production) in industrial firms are the various meetings where groups come together around a common task. The purpose of this dissertation is to contribute knowledge about the interactions that occur within and between work groups in their handling of their tasks in small industrial companies (SME’s) and the significance of these interactions on learning and effectiveness. The thesis focuses especially on the following questions: 1. What characterizes the interaction within and between work groups as they are expressed in various meetings? 2. What factors facilitate and hinder the interaction within and between work groups? 3. What are the consequences of different kinds of interaction regarding learning and effectiveness in work groups and in organizations? The study takes a critical realistic perspective on learning in organizations and is based on previous studies on learning, communication and effectiveness in groups and organisations. The study was conducted during 2008-2010 and used a qualitative and interactive approach. The collection of data was based on interviews, observations of video filmed meetings and on questionnaires. The analysis moves between two levels: interaction within groups and between groups at an organizational level. The interactions within and between groups were analysed based on contextual factors in order to understand whether different communication patterns were related to different types of learning and effectiveness. A rationalistic concept of effectiveness was challenged in favour of a humanistic approach where learning is an important aspect. Three major conclusions were drawn: Effectiveness presupposes that patterns of communication and management are tailored to the task at hand – performance or development. Feedback and links between groups need revision and steering to facilitate interaction. Discrepancies (contradictions, conflicts and disturbances) that are made visible in the organization may lead to development. Those remaining in the hidden disturb the performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 26.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Organizational learning in cross-functional teams. A study of a small manufacturing company2011In: Making Waves, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Påverkansprocesser i vuxnas lärande: kritiska händelser i en reflektionsgrupp2007Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Separate to integrate the task as a whole in work meetings?: Two types of learning hindering each other – the duality between execution and development of the same task2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many organizations have difficulties finding the necessary balance between execution and development of the same task. The phenomenon causes conflicting demands on an organization’s resources and can be identified as ambidexterity. In practice, the ambidexterity dilemma has been seen in the discussion of work meetings, which in some situations not are as effective as expected. Even if there has been a lot of research on the ambidexterity dilemma there are still a lack of studies on internal processes during interactions in work meetings (micro practices) according to different tasks. The purpose of this article is to explore how interaction during work meetings can be organized and managed in order to improve work meetings and stimulate learning for ambidexterity when dealing with the duality between the execution and development of a task. The overall question to be answered is – How can the execution and development of a task become an integrated part of the learning processes of individuals and groups? As theoretical framework Dewey’s and Ellströms theories of learning is used as a filter when analysing the interaction in video filmed meeting in an industry. The results indicate that execution and development are two different, equally important logics, in agreement with previous research. This study indicates that the two logics might need to be separated in time and space to become integrated in the minds of individuals and groups. The duality between execution and development becomes a whole when the same people are dealing with both dimensions of the task. The way an organization can meet human power is to ensure that people in the organization get involved in both execution and development but at different times and in different spaces to avoid the two logics interfering with each other.

  • 29.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Små grupper banbrytande [bloggpost]2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Ta dig ur kaninhålet – det kan öka din kreativitet [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Teams effectiveness in small medium sized manufacturing company2011In: Making Waves, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Varför utveckla teknik som liknar människan? [bloggpost]2021Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Vikten av att vara nära varandra [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Återupplivningsförsök av kunskap som inte används [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Ökat intresse för människor [bloggpost]2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Barry, Daved
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Embracing the unplanned: Organizational ambidexterity within manufacturing SMEs2019In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2019, article id 14906Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational Ambidexterity (OA)–the ability to simultaneously pursue exploration and exploitation–is increasingly being advocated as a way to gain competitive advantage. Most of the work on OA has focused on large, multi-divisional organizations, resulting in frameworks and prescriptions that have little utility for small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). With this in mind, we report on the first year of an exploratory, quasi-experimental study of ambidexterity within six small-to-medium manufacturing enterprises in Sweden. The research is characterized by an emic, ‘invented here’ approach, where companies closely examine their current exploration and exploitation practices, use their findings to formulate more advanced OA approaches uniquely suited to their values and circumstances, and iteratively apply and refine these over a four year period. It appears that the construct of ‘unplanned’ and associated sub-constructs such as ‘disturbance, crashes, and interruption’ could be an important key to framing and improving OA within these SMEs and perhaps more generally.

  • 37.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Att leda utbildningsorganisationer genom att integrera befintligt och nytt2022In: Skolchefers arbete: att leda ansvarsfullt i en föränderlig tid / [ed] Lene Foss & Joakim Krantz, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2022, p. 91-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Lärande under pandemin [video]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Simonsson, Johan
    Ideation and Research AI Labs, Husqvarna Group.
    A learning perspective on the interdependency between technology-driven and managerial- driven AI-transformation2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 122-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Moving from manual, to automated, to connected AI operations systems implies a significant transformation in the organisation of work (European Parliament, 2015:8) (Brock & von Wangenheim). To understand these “realistic AI” processes, to build competence for certain tasks. it is crucial to understand what organisational competencies that are needed and how to organize knowledge creation processes in practice (Ellström, 2001) Schön used the concept of “knowing–in-action” is nonreflective and solving most everyday practical problems, here understood as executional learning (Engström & Wikner, 2017). Thus, this knowing, according to Schön (1983), is not enough to meet more complex situations. To be aware of tacit knowledge, we need to distance ourselves and learn to reflect. More complex, uncertain and unclear tasks require “knowing-on-action” and collaboration between several competences to create new knowledge or to reach a new solution here understood as developmental learning (Engström&Wikner).. Anton et al. (2020) state that in many organisations there is a lack of AI-related competencies that prevent development of the full AI potential. For the development of the field, it is important to study the dynamic interplay between advanced technology and the social side of work from a learning and competence perspective. Therefore, this paper aims to explore how industrial organisations understand their competencies in relation to AI transformation from a knowledge creation perspective.

    Research method

    The study was part of a collaborative research project with an interdisciplinary research team and representatives from five industrial partners. In four-month cycles the industrial partners engaged in “homework” presented, analysed and discussed in common workshops. For this study, the homework was guided by the DIGITAL approach (Brock & von Wangenheim, 2019) and based on the explanatory model (Anton et al., 2020). The industrial partners studied how resources and competencies related to specific organisational tasks in their own organisations could be identified and defined. To aid the data collection (that was done by the industrial partners themselves) a framework capturing Anton et al.’s (2020) 13 dimensions of competencies (Leadership, Communication, Customer-focused decision making, Business development, Data science/STEM, Agile software development, Initiative and engagement, AI technology, Programming, Digital analysis tools, Data and network technology, Digital competencies, and Data management) was used. For each dimension the partners assesses the competence level: Competence central to the process; Competence exists internally; Competence partly exists internally; Competence does not exist internally; Competence can be gained by development internally; Competence needs to be sourced externally. These were in line with Brock & von Wangenheim’s (2019) logic that managers when starting AI project should do “internal resources check”. The data was analysed in four steps. First, focus group data was analysed by the facilitators at each industrial partner. Second, the competence mapping was analysed by the “working groups” at each industrial partner. Third, the transcribed data from the two industrial partners used in this paper were reviewed individually by t he authors. Fourth, the cross-disciplinary group of authors from both academia and industrial partners gathered for a common analysis session. This session primarily focused on the data from the competence mapping but also cross-checked with the input from the cross-functional focus groups to triangulate the outcome. During the common analysis the conceptual framework presented in the discussion section was developed through iterations between the theoretical framework based on the findings by Anton et al. (2020), and the data from the project.

    Findings

    The preliminary findings show differences among the industrial partners in how they view their own competencies. For some organisations organisational structures are in place, e.g., dedicated AI Labs, where the work with understanding the benefits and usage of the technology is ongoing on a rather advanced level. In other organisations the work has just been initiated. Overall, all representatives stress the importance of top management support and the need for dedicated forums. Among the organisations that have come the farthest in their AI transformation the structure given by the proposed framework is not enough. They emphasise the need to further frame it into also understanding what the competence is associated with and why it is needed. They view the leadership as almost having to have an evangelistic approach to it, where it does not seem to be enough with “only” technical experts. A conceptual framework, consisting of the relationship between the two dimensions: the managerial competencies and the technical competencies, is developed (Figure 1). The managerial competencies dimension concerns organisation and organising. The technical competencies dimension on the other hand captures the complexity level of the technology that is needed, the system of systems. The diagonal illustrates the relationship between these two dimensions, that is, the relation between technological complexity and organisational ability. The lower part of the diagonal captures isolated, simple processes (presumably internal) while the upper part of the diagonal captures integrated, complex processes (presumably primarily related to external parts and/or actors).. For high levels of technical complexity that requires high levels of technical competencies within the organisation the organisation also needs to advance the managerial competencies and the developmental learning processes. However, while in the long-term perspective we suggest that going off the diagonal will be inefficient and ineffective, hence, waste, it might be needed to do that temporarily, as the organisation develops. We believe that this developmentcan be either technology-driven or organisation-driven.

    The proposed conceptual framework is intended to help organisations plot their own current position based on the two dimensions and identify what changes are needed to reach the diagonal. It can also be used to define where on the diagonal the organisation ultimately wants to end up. It is not relevant for all companies or even for all sectors overall to be at the top right side. We believe that AI transformation cannot be approached as either technologydriven or managerial-driven, but as an e interdependent process of both dimensions.

  • 40.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Effectual learning in SME’s to promote transformation instead of frustration: Towards a design of an intervention study2016In: The 4th Effectuation Conference, Bodø, June 5-7, 2016., The Society for Effectual Action , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Working meetings and inspiration for learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Barry, Daved
    Clarkson Univ, Potsdam, NY USA..
    Knowledge creation in projects: an interactive research approach for deeper business insight2023In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 22-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to shed light on different types of knowledge created and how this links to the project design, process, and content. Design/methodology/approach In this paper the authors investigate participants' experiences from a three-year interactive research project, designed to trigger reflection among the participants. They apply a knowledge creation perspective on experiences expressed by participants as a result of different research project activities. Findings The study resulted in five categories of insights with potential for sustainable influence on the participating organizations: an understanding of concepts and theories; an understanding of the impacts of collaborative, reflective work processes; an understanding of the meaning of one's own organizational context; an understanding of the importance of increased organizational self-awareness; and an understanding of the potential for human interaction and communication. Practical implications The author's findings suggest that it is possible to design a project to promote more profound and sustainable effects on a business beyond the explicit purpose of the project. They advise practitioners to make room for iterative reflection; be mindful to create a trustful and open environment in the team; challenge results with opposing views and theories; and make room for sharing experiences and giving feedback. Originality/value This study contributes to unraveling key practices which can nurture conditions for knowledge creation in interactive research projects and business projects alike.

  • 43.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Early steps in learning about organizational learning in customization settings: A communication perspective2019In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to empirically investigate the role of learning for suppliers of individualized customizations from a communication perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach: Five companies providing individualized customizations are investigated through an in-depth qualitative approach. The empirical material is based on data from five presentations in one workshop and seven interviews.

    Findings: Four important categories of communication processes between suppliers and customers that stimulate learning were identified: the identification and confirmation of existing knowledge, the identification of knowledge gaps and the creation of new knowledge, the definition of relations and procedures and evaluation and learning.

    Practical implications: These findings can help suppliers of individualized customizations become aware of the important role of organizational learning in their day-to-day operations and the value of improving as a learning organization.

    Originality/value: This cross-disciplinary study brings together organizational learning and customization research. It is a study that focuses on communication in customization tasks as a base for learning. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 44.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Learning to make a difference in customization settings2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Käkelä, Nikolas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Ambidextrous learning in a customer order–based context2022In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 116-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the paper is to describe ambidextrous learning in organizations within the customer order-based context (COBC), here based on a dynamic view of work processes. The study focuses on how organizations can learn while working with customer orders, considering learning in organizations as both a process and an outcome.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This conceptual article focuses on learning in the COBC, where the individual customer requirements represent a key input into the organization’s work processes, thus limiting the possibilities to plan and standardize. The COBC brings about challenges and potentials for learning in organizations where task variety and complexity are high and in which the contradictory interplay between efficiency and responsiveness is apparent not only at a strategic level but also at an operative level in the customer order fulfillment processes. Depending on the variations in tasks and parallel complex work processes between different units in the organization, the ambidextrous learning dynamic can appear in the COBC.

    Findings

    Five propositions were made from the analysis: Proposition 1: Learning in the COBC can occur both in real-time but also in retrospect and with sporadic and recurrent interventions. Proposition 2: Learning in the COBC can occur for, as well as from, customer order processes. Proposition 3: Learning in the COBC varies and will depend on the delivery strategy. Proposition 4: Learning can be stimulated by the variation in priorities among customer orders in the COBC because the work characteristics for the back office and front office differ between customer order fulfillment processes. Proposition 5: Learning in the COBC can occur both within the back office and front office but also between these organizational units. The paper discusses the importance of building learning infrastructure in COBC and how that can be supported by a suggested learning office.

    Originality/value

    The present study demonstrates the importance of functions being able to act both as back office and front office in relation to delivery strategy. It also shows the ambidextrous learning process for the sake of improving both the internal efficiency and external effectiveness across the organization.

  • 46.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Lundin, Mona
    Personalvetenskapliga perspektiv på kommunikation2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mohlin, Alice
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Understanding Organizational Tensions During Artificial Intelligence Transformation2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mohlin, Alice
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Understanding Organizational Tensions During Artificial Intelligence Transformation2022In: Proceedings of The Annual Meeting of The Academy of Management, 2022, Vol. 2022, No. 1, Academy of Management , 2022, Vol. Vol. 2022, no 1, p. 12745-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AI has the potential to be a disruptive technology causing paradigm shifts in industries and greatly impacting both operational and strategic decision making. Adopting AI technologies requires proactively engaging both the technical and social system of the organization as processes, workflows, as well as individual employees, are influenced. This paper explores potential tensions between the social and technical systems in the early change process of AI transformation to understand the nature and degree of AI transformation. We do this by analyzing in-depth inquiry from 23 focus groups involving 112 white-collar industrial employees in large multinational industrial firms using a change management perspective. Our study revealed nine categories of tensions divided into tensions between the current and future state and tensions between humans and machines. This stresses the need to adopt a socio-technical perspective in the attempt to understand organizations approaching AI and provides practical implications for organizations considering adopting AI technologies.

  • 49.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mohlin, Alice
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    How AI Transformation triggers new perspectives in organizational learning2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Engström, Annika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Identifying scenarios for ambidextrous learning in a decoupling thinking context2017In: / [ed] Hermann Lödding, Ralph Riedel, Klaus-Dieter Thoben, Gregor von Cieminski, Dimitris Kiritsis, Springer, 2017, p. 320-327Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human perspective and the flow perspective of businesses represent two areas of competence that study similar systems but with different frame of references. The human perspective involves ambidextrous learning that concerns how knowledge is developed and used for different purposes by individuals or groups of individuals. The development of knowledge for new situations is referred to as ‘exploration’, while ‘exploitation’ refers to execution in known and stable contexts. Furthermore, decoupling thinking is important from a flow perspective and concerns how a value-delivery package is created. This type of thinking decouples the flow perspective into segments with different characteristics that are significant for process management. The examples presented in this paper are distinctive drivers of flow in terms of speculation or commitment, and the level of customisation. By combining these two perspectives, a set of 15 scenarios is identified for further research on ambidextrous learning in a decoupling thinking context.

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