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  • 1. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Ekström, Mats
    Moberg, Ulla
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Pressen sviker sin roll2010In: Nerikes Allehanda, no 2010-09-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Höijer, Birgitta
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Individualisation and nationalisation of the climate issue: two ideological horizons in Swedish news media2009In: Climate change and the media / [ed] Tammy Boyce, Justin Lewis, New York: Peter Lang Publishing , 2009, p. 211-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Individualization and nationalization of the climate issue: two ideological horizons in Swedish news media2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Intentional and unintentional transnationalism: two political identities repressed by national identity in the news media2011In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how the powerful mechanisms of nation-state discourse in the news media obscure emerging constructions of transnational political thought and action. With the aid of empirical examples from qualitative media studies on critical events extensively covered by the news media, the article demonstrates how national identity in the news media represses transnational political identities of the intentional as well as the unintentional kind.

  • 5. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Intentional and unintentional transnationalism: two political identities repressed by national media2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    "€˜Klimatfrågans död till stor del mediernas fel€"2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, no 5 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Kritisk diskursanalys2008In: Mediernas språk / [ed] Mats Ekström, Malmö: Liber, 2008, 1, p. 121-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Miljön, forskningen - och så medie- och kommunikationsforskningen2011In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 83-86Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Social representations of climate change in the media and among citizens2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    The 'climate threat' as ideology: interrelations between citizen and media discourses2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    The structural repression of the transnational: social representations of the nation-state in the news media2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Towards a renewed Research Agenda for Media Studies on Climate Change2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    What is Sustainable Journalism?: An introduction2017In: What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, Our Common Future, the report from the UN World Commission on Environment and Development (also known as the Brundtland Report), pointed out economic growth, environmental protection and social equality as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be balanced and reconciled. Economic growth is in this sense necessary for a developing world, but a one-sided focus on economy will eventually lead to a world that is both socially and environmentally poorer. Obviously, the issue of sustainability has not been absent from the field of journalism research; on the contrary, there is plenty of research focusing on journalism and environmental sustainability (e.g., climate change, fracking, renewables, etc.), social sustainability (e.g., democratic and political participation, poverty, inequality), and economic sustainability (e.g., ownership, commercialization, business models). However, where journalism studies traditionally treat these three aspects of sustainability disjointedly, this book attempts to pull them closer together and integrally approach sustainable development in its environmental, social and economic sense.

    The book departs from the premise that journalism has a role to play in global sustainable development—to inform, investigate and to educate in ways that reconcile the three pillars. It also raises questions about the internal sustainability of journalism itself, asking how its rampant need for economically sustainable business models can possibly be negotiated with its social and environmental obligations and impacts. In this way, the concept of sustainable journalism interlinks two current sustainability challenges that are of great theoretical relevance and in urgent need of empirical research.

  • 14.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olausson, UlrikaJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.Ots, MartJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    What Is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume, which elaborates on the idea and concept of sustainable journalism, is the result of a perceived lack of integral research approaches to journalism and sustainable development. Thirty years ago, in 1987, the Brundtland Report pointed out economic growth, social equality and environmental protection as the three main pillars of a sustainable development. These pillars are intertwined, interdependent, and need to be reconciled. However, usually, scholars interested in the business crisis of the media industry tend to leave the social and environmental dimensions of journalism aside, and vice versa. What Is Sustainable Journalism? is the first book that discusses and examines the economic, social and environmental challenges of professional journalism simultaneously. This unique book and fresh contribution to the discussion of the future of journalism assembles international expertise in all three fields, arguing for the necessity of integral research perspectives and for sustainable journalism as the key to long-term survival of professional journalism. The book is relevant for scholars and master’s students in media economy, media and communication, and environmental communication.

  • 15. Höijer, Birgitta
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    The role of the media in the transformation of citizens' social representations of suffering2010In: Education, professionalization and social representations: on the transformation of social knowledge / [ed] Mohamed Chaib, Berth Danermark, Staffan Selander, London: Routledge, 2010, p. 200-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    To spray or not to spray: the discursive construction of contested environmental issues in the news media2013In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the role of the news media in the (re)definition of contested environmental issues. It analyzes how the media, by means of various discursive strategies, legitimize or de-legitimize different claims about how to handle environmental issues. Guided by critical discourse analysis, the paper analyzes the news reporting on two cases of insect outbreaks in Sweden: one which resulted in spraying and one which did not. The analysis concludes that the production of hegemonic meaning on contested environmental issues – i.e.  the process by which certain definitions of how to understand and manage them emerge victorious from the discursive struggle between stakeholders – is closely linked to journalistic routines, as well as to media logic in general and to the media’s difficulties in handling scientific uncertainty in particular.

  • 17.
    Mörner, Cecilia
    et al.
    School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Hunting the Beast on YouTube: The framing of nature in social media2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans’ perceived relationship to nature and non-human lifeforms is fundamental for sustainable development; different framings of nature – as commodity, as threat, as sacred etc. – imply different responses to future challenges. The body of research on nature repre-sentations in various symbolic contexts is growing, but the ways in which nature is framed by people in the everyday has received scant attention. This paper aims to contribute to our understanding of the framing of nature by studying how wild-boar hunting is depicted on YouTube. The qualitative frame analysis identified three interrelated frames depicting hunting as battle, as consumption, and as privilege, all of which constitute and are constituted by the underlying notion of human as superior to nature. It is suggested that these hegemonic nature frames suppress more constructive ways of framing the human-nature relationship, but also that the identification of such potential counter-hegemonic frames enables their discursive manifestation.

  • 18.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Bard eller brygga? De nationella medierna i globaliseringen1996In: Mediernas vi och dom: mediernas betydelse för den strukturella diskrimineringen, Stockholm: Fritzes, 1996, p. 309-338Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Explaining global media: a discourse approach2011In: The systemic dimension of globalization / [ed] Piotr Pachura, Rijeka, Croatia: Intech Open Access Publisher , 2011, p. 135-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Global Warming - Global Responsibility? Media Frames of Collective Action and Scientific Certainty2009In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 421-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing interconnectedness of the world that characterizes the process of globalization compels us to interlink local, national, and transnational phenomena, such as environmental risks, in both journalistic and academic discourse. Among environmental risks of global scope climate change is probably the one receiving the most attention at present, not least in the media. Globalization notwithstanding, national media are still dominated by a national logic in the presentation of news, and tensions arise between this media logic and the transnational character of environmental risks that call for a collective responsibility transcending the borders of the nation-states. This article presents results from studies of the construction of global climate change in three Swedish newspapers. It discusses the media’s attribution of responsibility for collective action along an axis ranging from local to national to transnational, and highlights the media’s reluctance to display any kind of scientific uncertainty that would undermine the demand for collective action. The results underline the media’s responsiveness to the political setting in which they operate and the growing relevance of the transnational political realm of Europe for the construction of news frames on global climate change in European national media.

  • 21.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Identitet2009In: Mediesamhället: centrala begrepp / [ed] Peter Berglez, Ulrika Olausson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, p. 137-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Klimatet i medierna: ett tillrättalagt drama?2010In: Sverige i nytt klimat: våtvarm utmaning / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2010, p. 103-116Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Medborgarskap och globalisering: den diskursiva konstruktionen av politisk identitet2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes as its point of departure the theorizing on citizenship and globalization. Today it is common to discuss a “flexible” citizenship beyond the paradigm of the nationstate, which, besides its legal aspects of rights and obligations, also includes identification with and participation in various communities, primarily political ones. “Politics”, in this context, is considered to be constituted on the micro-level, discursively between individuals (e.g. Laclau and Mouffe 1985).

    The aim of the study is to, through the study of collective meaning making, contribute to the theory building about citizenship and globalization. The study consists of three cases, each of which attracted much media attention, with varying degrees of proximity and distance. The construction of political community, on various levels on the globalization scale (subnational, national, transnational) within the collective meaning making, is studied.

    The aim of the study also includes the analysis of the discursive resources that are used for the making of meaning. “External” discourses such as media messages and interpersonal communication are analyzed as well as “internal” ones: e.g. values, norms, identifications and experiences. In addition, the study aims at localizing the construction of meaning and community within the structural context , and relating it to current structures of power. The thesis is concluded with a suggestion of how to relate the discursive construction of political identity to deliberative democracy theory.

    The empirical material is collected by means of focus-groups interviews, including 2–5 people, with a total of 133 respondents. The transcribed material is analyzed by means of critical discourse analysis, CDA.

    The study identifies two different types of identity constructions: processes of nationalization, where the experienced Swedish identity and community function normatively in the making of meaning, and processes of subnationalization, among those groups that somehow felt excluded from and mistreated by the national (Swedish) environment. The thesis concludes that the collective making of meaning within an assumed national community contains ideological elements and works to a large extent in the service of power. However, the subnationally compressed communities create meaning in an oppositional manner, compared with the nationalized community and in relation to structures of power.  Active citizenship is thus best located in conflict, among groups that experience exclusion and oppression in different situations (Mouffe 1995b). If this is right, the focus must shift from consensus to communication, efforts to open up discursive bridges between the hegemonic community and dissident voices should be made (c.f. Aronowitz 1995). An important space for transgressing communication is of course the media. However, the study shows that the media must deal with some problems before they are ready to serve as discursive bridges, for instance the tendency to make the factual antagonisms subordinate to homogenizing emotional reporting. In addition, there seems to exist a need for the political institutions to move beyond the paradigm of the nation-state, and find other frameworks for the democratic processes, not least at the subnational level. Thus, instead of discussing either a global or a national citizenship one could, with Habermas (2001), reflect on a postnational citizenship relating to the reflexive transformation of national civic sovereignty into subnational and supranational citizenship.

  • 24.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Saddam Hussein från Gulfkrig till Gulfkrig: Sverige och USA: utrikespolitik och och nyhetsrapportering1999Book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    "Sanningen har ju alltid två sidor": svenska medborgare om medierna och Kosovokonflikten2003In: Norska och svenska medborgare om medierna och Kosovokonflikten, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2003, p. 87-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    “Stop Blaming the Cows!”: How Livestock Production is Legitimized in Everyday Discourse on Facebook2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 28-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2016, Swedish climate reporting declined in quantity and shifted focus somewhat from climate change as such to the harmful climate impacts of meat consumption. The latter prompted discussions in social media – an increasingly important forum for public debate but infrequently studied in environmental communication research. Despite strong evidence that a meat and dairy based diet is devastating for the environment, meat consumption is increasing, and this qualitative study aims to – through the lens of social representation theory – contribute knowledge about how livestock production is legitimized in everyday discourse on Facebook. The article identifies representations that legitimize livestock production through polarization between (1) livestock production and other (environmental) issues, (2) environmentally “good” and “bad” countries, and (3) “reliable” and “unreliable” information. It concludes by discussing the influence of national ideology on the legitimization of livestock production and the potential of social media to counter the post-politicization of environmental issues.

  • 27.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The celebrified journalist: Journalistic self-promotion and branding in celebrity constructions on Twitter2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 19, no 16, p. 2379-2399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ongoing transformations of the media ecology in the direction of greater digitization have increasingly blurred the boundaries between professional journalists and other information brokers; the former now must work hard to distinguish themselves from the latter. Notable among these developments is a shift towards the individualization of journalism, with journalists seeming to spend more time building personal brands, for instance on Twitter, than on building organizational ones. Within journalism research there is a growing interest in the use of Twitter for journalistic self-promotion and branding, but studies are still scarce, and the ways in which journalistic self-promotion is discursively constituted need further empirical and theoretical attention. By means of a critical discourse analysis of the tweets of a widely followed journalist in Sweden, and through the theoretical lens of celebrity, this study aims to contribute knowledge about how journalistic self-promotion discourses evolving in the digitized media setting are constituted. The article identifies discourses that construct celebrity through (1) “fame by association,” (2) asymmetrical communication, and (3) “lifestreaming.” It concludes by discussing “celebrification” as a vital component of journalistic self-promotion discourses as well as the power aspects of ubiquitous self-promotional discourses, which are deeply embedded in the general structures of society.

  • 28.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    The 'climate threat' and constructions of identity in Swedish news media2010In: Communicating risks: towards the threat society / [ed] Stig-Arne Nohrstedt, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2010, p. 97-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    The Diversified Nature of "Domesticated" News Discourse: The Case of Climate Change in National News Media2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The diversified nature of “domesticated” news discourse: The case of climate change in national news media2014In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 711-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have concluded that foreign news in national media is characterized by a national logic largely caused by so-called “domestication,” i.e. the adaptation of news from “outside” to a perceived national audience. The domesticated news discourse counteracts discursive constructions of the global, reinforcing instead nation-state discourse and identity. However, this paper argues that we need to take the search for constructions of the transnational beyond the genre of foreign news. The deterritorialized nature of today's globalized risks and crises, such as climate change, blurs the boundaries between the domestic and foreign, and renders the distinction between domestic and foreign news more or less obsolete. This, in turn, requires us to revisit the concept and practice of “domestication” using context-sensitive analytical approaches to capture its discursive constitution. Guided by the theoretical and methodological framework of critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper aims to analyze and de-construct news discourses of “domestication” by studying the reporting on climate change in Indian, Swedish, and US newspapers. It identifies three discursive modes of domestication: (1) introverted domestication, which disconnects the domestic from the global; (2) extroverted domestication, which interconnects the domestic and the global; and (3) counter-domestication, a deterritorialized mode of reporting that lacks any domestic epicenter.

  • 31.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    The ideological horizons of citizenship: national media as discursive bridge2007In: Ideological horizons in media and citizen discourses: theoretical and methodological approaches, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2007, p. 51-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Reinvented Journalist: The Discursive Construction of Professional Identity on Twitter2017In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 61-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there is much academic discussion about how journalism and journalists are affected by rapid change and convergence in the work context. Considering the fundamental transformations of the media ecology brought about by digitization and the advent of social media, it has been assumed that journalists are more or less compelled to reinvent their professional role and identity. We know a good deal about how social media is adopted by journalists, mostly through survey and interview studies investigating self-perceptions of identity in terms of norms and values. There are also some case studies, predominantly in the form of (quantitative) content analyses, exploring the (innovative) uses of Twitter. However, we still have little knowledge about how the professional identity of journalists is discursively constructed – how, in specific detail, traditional norms and ideals are discursively reinforced or challenged – in the Twitter flow. With a discourse theoretical and methodological approach, this article aims to contribute to our understanding of the discursive construction of professional identity on Twitter by qualitatively analyzing tweets from the most widely followed journalist in Sweden. The analysis of the most active j-tweeter can yield important clues as to what journalism may be in the process of becoming. The article identifies discourses that (1) reinforce the watchdog identity, (2) challenge the watchdog identity, (3) reinforce the disseminator/explicator identity, and (4) reinforce transparency but challenge professional identity. It concludes that the reinvented journalistic identity includes discursive processes that both shape and are shaped by Twitter in a dialectical relationship. 

  • 33.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Theorizing global media as global discourse2013In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 7, p. 1281-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of global media studies, there is an ongoing conflict between the globalists, who emphasize the media’s pertinent role in globalization processes, and the skeptics, who stress the continuing stability of the nation-state paradigm as regards the media. Nonetheless, these two positions share one fundamental view on global media: that the proper objects of study are those media whose global nature is defined in terms of geographic reach. In the discourse perspective theorized in this article, however, “globality” is instead viewed as a discursive feature. It is argued that the established understanding of global media as media of transnational reach needs to be complemented with a discourse approach―focusing on the very knowledge production of “the global.”

  • 34.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Threat conceptions of climate change and constructions of political identity2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Towards a European identity?: The news media and the case of climate change2010In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 138-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research on the discursive construction of Europe in national news media has quantitatively focused on the presence of ‘EU topics’. The more frequently EU topics appear, the better the breeding-ground for a sense of European community, it is argued. This article tackles the question of a European identity from a different angle. Guided by theories on collective identity and power, and utilizing qualitative discourse analysis of the reporting on climate change in a tabloid newspaper and public service television news in Sweden, this article discerns a budding European political identity, discursively embedded and ‘hidden’ in the reporting as the natural order of things. When turned into common-sense knowledge, the European realm as a representative of ‘Us’ is accorded spontaneous legitimacy as a relevant political power in the making of meaning on climate change.

  • 36.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Ungdomar i Göteborg berättar om branden2000In: Göteborgsbranden 1998: en studie om kommunikation, rykten och förtroende / [ed] Larsåke Larsson, Stig Arne Nohrstedt, Stockholm: Styrelsen för psykologiskt försvar , 2000, p. 121-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Vi kommer bara ihåg våldsamheterna: medborgare om Göteborgskravallerna och medierapporteringen2002Book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    "We’re the ones to blame": Citizens' representations of climate change and the role of the media2011In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 281-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the discussion on how to meet the challenges of climate change the important role of news reporting is often emphasized; the media are considered to have significant influence on citizens' understandings of the issue. However, studies that empirically explore the media's role in shaping these understandings are rather scarce compared with analyses of media content alone. While fully acknowledging the fruitfulness of the study of media material, this article argues that there are tendencies in these studies to, in a somewhat "media-centric" fashion, reduce the complexity of the relationship between media content and audience reception. The article, which reports on findings from a focus-group study containing 53 Swedish citizens, starts from the premise that this relationship must be subjected to empirical analysis rather than axiomatically asserted, and aims to contribute empirically based knowledge on the connection between media staging of climate change and citizens' representations of this global risk.

  • 39.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Media and Climate Change: Four Long-standing Research Challenges Revisited2016In: Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading? / [ed] Olausson, Ulrika & Berglez, Peter, Routledge, 2016, p. 111-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    Media and climate change: Four long-standing research challenges revisited2014In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 249-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests some further avenues of empirical and theoretical investigation for media research on climate change. “Old” suggestions, whose significance, as we see it, needs to be further reinforced, are included, as are “new” ones, which we hope will generate innovative research questions. In order to integrate the analysis with knowledge generated by media research at large, we revisit four research challenges that media scholars have long grappled with in the investigation of journalism: (1) the discursive challenge, i.e. the production, content and reception of media discourse; (2) the interdisciplinary challenge, i.e. how media research might engage in productive collaboration with other disciplines; (3) the international challenge, i.e. how to achieve a more diverse and complex understanding of news reporting globally; and (4) the practical challenge, i.e. how to reduce the theory–practice divide in media research.

  • 41.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, PeterJönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Media research on climate change: Where have we been and where are we heading?2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    Media Research on Climate Change: Where have we been and where are we heading?2014In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 139-141Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Berglez, Peter
    Stor risk att allt fler kommer att strunta i klimatfrågan2010In: Dagens Nyheter, no 2010-11-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University.
    The post-political condition of climate change: an ideology approach2014In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 54-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have argued that environmental discourse in general and climate change discourse in particular have contributed to a post-politicization of the public sphere, meaning there is now an absence of deeper conflicting viewpoints about the future direction of society; capitalism has been naturalized as the only conceivable option for the organization of socio-political-ecological life. The aim of the study is to empirically explore the ways in which the post-political condition of climate change is established in public discourse. Applying an ideology-theoretical approach to a focus-group study with Swedish citizens, the article analyzes how the post-politicization of the climate issue is shaped by 1) belief in a “climate threat,” 2) personal experiences of a “climate threat,” and 3) integration of a “climate threat” into everyday practices. We conclude that the post-politicization of climate change could be explained by a consensual discourse constituted by the particularization of climate change causes, a lack of passionate emotions, and “neurotic” micro-political action.

  • 45.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Berglez, Peter
    Towards a renewed agenda for media research on climate change2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Berglez, Peter
    Towards a renewed research agenda for media research on climate change2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Towards a research agenda for sustainable journalism2016In: ECREA 2016 abstract book, Prague: Czech-In , 2016, p. 415-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Djerf-Pierre, Monika
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Miljöjournalistik2015In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Karlsson, Michael & Strömbäck, Jesper, Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 243-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Mobile identities: adults’ use of music in digital media2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Höijer, Birgitta
    The role of the media in the transformation of citizens' social representations of suffering2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modernity changed our social representations of suffering and death, which previous in history were present in everyday life. Today, those phenomena are institutionalised and hospitalised away from people’s homes and social life. The media, however, almost daily serve us intrusive pictures of victims of violence, of human suffering and brutal death. It is the distant suffering of strangers. This paper presents results from studies of citizens’ social representations of distant suffering and discusses two identity positions founded in ideology that arises in relation to the media reporting: national identity and global identity. At a macro level these positions can be related to the contradictory processes of globalisation, on the one hand the ideology of human rights and global compassion and on the other hand nationalism. The result underlines the important role played by the media in the complex processes of transformations of common sense knowledge.

12 1 - 50 of 54
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