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  • 1.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Division of Medical Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Peri-radiographic guidelines for children with autism spectrum disorder: a nationwide survey in Sweden2017In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of guidelines and routines used nationwide when children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are taken care of and examined in a radiology department during a peri-radiographic process.

    METHOD: A nationwide survey was compiled and distributed to 94 radiology departments throughout Sweden, i.e. those performing more than 100 000 radiographic examinations annually. The survey was designed as a web questionnaire with seven questions on possible guidelines and/or routines for the departments when preparing and taking care of children with ASD in conjunction with a radiographic procedure. The data were scrutinized, using descriptive statistics.

    RESULTS: In total, 86 radiology departments responded to the survey (response rate 92%). Of those departments, 40 did not examine children with ASD. None of the departments included in the study had existing guidelines underpinning the routines when preparing and performing radiographic examinations for children diagnosed with ASD. A few departments (n = 8) would set aside more time for the procedure if it were known in advance that the child to be examined had been diagnosed with ASD. Also, some departments (n = 7) had radiographers who were more experienced in the care of children who would be appointed to perform examinations for children with ASD.

    CONCLUSION: It is suggested that guidelines should be developed in order to increase interaction in a supportive way and decrease anxiety during the peri-radiographic process with children with ASD.

  • 2.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?2017In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 58, no 1 Suppl., p. 16-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Anxiety is often experienced by children undergoing health care procedures, and children with autism spectrum disorders (ADS) experience more anxiety than typically developed children. A prerequisite for obtaining an optimum procedure is firstly based on the health care provider’s knowledge about children with ASD, but may also depend on the use of guidelines. Two previous national surveys showed, that none radiology or paediatric departments and a minority of anaesthesiology departments throughout Sweden use specific guidelines when seeing children with ASD. Following, the purpose was to develop guidelines to use when caring for and preparing children with ASD in those settings.

    Methods: A modified Delphi method was used, including19 experts identified from the two afore mentioned surveys. The questions considered in the process, proceeded from previous research and the results from the surveys. The experts’ responses regarding the importance of each item, were analysed and scrutinized between each round.

    Results: The Delphi process resulted in guidelines consisting of 15 items and a checklist with 16 aspects. The items cover the areas: planning and involving parents, features in the environment, use of time, communication, thehealth care professionals. The checklist covers the child’spattern of communication, anxiety, sensory stimuli, special interests and likes/dislikes.

    Conclusions: To obtain an optimum caring encounter when a child with ASD is seen in the preoperative and radiology setting, a meticulous planning is important and the environment should be adjusted for the needs of the child. To accomplish this, guidelines need to be in place and be followed.

  • 3.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Ludvigsson, J.
    Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n  = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65, insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P  < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

  • 4.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Institution of Health Science, University College Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The everyday life of the young child shortly after receiving a cancer diagnosis, from both children's and parent's perspectives2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Providing qualified, evidence-based healthcare to children requires increased knowledge of how cancer affects the young child's life. There is a dearth of research focusing on the young child's experience of everyday life.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore young children's and their parents' perceptions of how cancer affects the child's health and everyday life shortly after diagnosis.

    Methods: Thirteen children with newly diagnosed cancer aged 1 to 6 years and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden, participated in this study through semistructured interviews. Child and parent data were analyzed as a family unit, using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Everyday life was spent at hospital or at home waiting to go back to hospital. Analysis led to the following categories: feeling like a stranger, feeling powerless, and feeling isolated.

    Conclusions: The child wants to be seen as a competent individual requiring information and participation in care. Parents need to be a safe haven for their child and not feel forced to legitimize painful and traumatic procedures by assisting with them. Nurses play a major role in the lives of children. Research with and on the young child is necessary and a way of making them visible and promoting their health and well-being.

    Implications for practice: Nurses need to reevaluate the newly diagnosed child's care routines so as to shift focus from the illness to the child. This requires competent nurses, secure in their caring role.

  • 5.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sjöqvist, Michael
    Granlund, Mats
    Participation restriction is not equal to low frequency of participation in children with  mild intellectual DisabilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ankarcrona, Elisabeth
    Pediatric department, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jörgense, Anna
    Pediatric department, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Undocumented refugee children in Swedish healthcare: Nurses' knowledge concerning regulations and their attitudes about the care2012In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, ISSN 0107-4083, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate nurses' attitudes about care for undocumented refugee children and also to investigate the knowledge among nurses concerning the regulations for this care. The study is quantitative and based on a questionnaire sent to all nurses working in pediatric healthcare and medical care in a medium-sized county in Sweden. The overall response was 91 questionnaires (55.9%). Most of the respondents felt insecure or lacked knowledge of what regulations are valid when undocumented refugee children seek medical care or healthcare. Almost all nurses had a positive attitude toward caring for these children, but they feel they lack knowledge about the regulations regarding their care. To optimize the care situation for these children the regulations should be reviewed and altered to allow the nurse, legally and securely, to care for them.

  • 7.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Science, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Darcy, Laura
    Department of Health Science, University College Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    A Swedish perspective on nursing and psychosocial research in paediatric oncology: A literature review2015In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 310-317Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: A dramatic improvement in outcomes of survival rates of childhood cancer has been seen. Caring science research is central in providing skills and knowledge to the health care sector, but few overviews of the content of published research have been carried out. The aim of this review was to investigate the content and methodology of published studies in paediatric oncology relevant to caring science, and also to compare possible differences in content and method of the published studies from the nursing and psychosocial perspectives.

    METHOD: A systematic literature review was performed of 137 published articles on paediatric oncology relevant to caring science in Sweden.

    RESULTS: The results show that most of the studies were descriptive or comparative ones with a quantitative design. Most of them focused on parents (43%) or children (28%). Most of the studies investigated wellbeing (88%), using questionnaires (54%) or interviews (38%). Several different measurement instruments had been used. While the results were often clearly presented, the clinical implications were more diffuse. The most acknowledged research fund was the Swedish Childhood Foundation (75%).

    CONCLUSIONS: To reflect the children' perspectives in paediatric oncology require that future researchers take on the challenge of including children (even young ones) in research. The use of a limited number of agreed measurement instruments is desirable. The biggest challenge for the future is to make a shift from explorative to intervention studies. There is an urgent need to transform research results into clinical practice.

  • 8.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Science, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Darcy, Laura
    Institution of Health Science, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Institution of Health Science, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    An analytic review of clinical implications from nursing and psychosocial research within Swedish pediatric oncology2015In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Darcy, Laura
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    A literature review of the results from nursing and psychosocial research within Swedish pediatric oncology2014In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 1-8Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The body of research-based knowledge in paediatric caring science has been increasing leading to dramaticimprovements in treatment. The purpose of this manuscript was to analyze results as stated by the researchers', inrecently published articles on nursing and psychosocial research, within Swedish pediatric oncology setting. Thiswas done through a review of 137 published articles about paediatric oncology related to caring science in Sweden.The result shows that the illness has affected, in both positive and negative ways, the wellbeing of everyone cominginto contact with the child. The cancer also causes distress related to all aspects of life including physical,psychological, existential and social. Mediating factors for the experience of distress and wellbeing are: disease andtreatment severity, age, gender and ethnicity of the participant, time since diagnosis, the use of internal and externalsupport, and the identity of the person reporting the data. Health promoting aspects frequently reported are: familytogetherness, coping strategies, engaging in normal life and activities, and quality of care which includes emotionalsupport, information and family participation in care. The hospital staff has to be aware of the psychosocial issuesexperienced by children with cancer and their families, and they have to acknowledge the value of formalinterventions, reporting benefits for children, families, and themselves.

  • 10.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Management of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the anesthesia and radiographic context2017In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, ISSN 0196-206X, E-ISSN 1536-7312, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: As a primary objective, this study purports to develop guidelines to better care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly regarding these children's preparation for anesthesia and radiologic procedures.

    Methods: Using a Delphi method with an online distribution of questionnaire, guidelines for caring for children with ASD were created. Twenty-one participants were included in the expert panel. These participants were working with children with ASD in several anesthesia and radiology departments in Sweden. A list of items was created from a previous survey and the literature. In the first round, the items with <60% agreement were discarded. Items were merged, and a new list was created. Two more similar rounds were performed. In the last 2 rounds, 21 participants responded, and 80% agreement was considered to be consensus.

    Results: The final guidelines consisted of 14 items and a checklist of 16 factors. The 5 areas covered by the items and the checklist were as follows: planning involving parents/guardians, features in the environment, and use of time, communication, and the health care professionals. The organization was important in making it possible for the health care professional to care for the individual child according to the child's needs. It was important to involve the parents/guardians to obtain knowledge about the functioning of the child.

    Conclusion: A caring encounter involving a child with ASD in the anesthesia and radiology contexts requires advance planning, catered specifically to the individual needs of each child. To accomplish this, general knowledge regarding ASD and ASD's particular manifestation in the child entrusted to their care, is required from the health care workers. The organization needs to have structures in place to facilitate this process.

  • 11.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Perioperative and anesthesia guidelines for children with autism: A nationwide survey from Sweden2016In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, ISSN 0196-206X, E-ISSN 1536-7312, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 457-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The overall aim of this study was to describe the current set of guidelines for the preparation and care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the perioperative setting across Sweden and explore the content of these guidelines in detail.

    Method: An online questionnaire was distributed to the chairpersons of all anesthesia departments (n = 68) and pediatric departments (n = 38) throughout Sweden. Follow-up phone calls were made to those departments that did not return the questionnaire. The presence of guidelines was analyzed through descriptive statistics. These guidelines and comments on routines used in these departments were analyzed inspired by conventional content analysis.

    Results: Seven of the 68 anesthesia departments and none of the 38 pediatric departments across Sweden have guidelines for preparing and/or administering care to children with ASD within the perioperative setting. From the guidelines and routines used, 3 categories emerge: "lacking the necessary conditions," "no extra considerations needed," and "care with specific consideration for children with ASD." These 3 categories span a continuum in the care. In the first category, the anesthesia induction could result in the child with ASD being physically restrained. In the last category, the entire encounter with the health care service would be adapted to the specific needs of the child.

    Conclusion: There is a lack of evidence-based guidelines specifically designed to meet the needs of children with ASD in the preoperative period in Sweden. Further research is needed to understand if children with ASD would benefit from evidence-based guidelines.

  • 12.
    Hasselberg, Marita
    et al.
    Child and Adolescent Clinic, Södra Älvsborg's Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Breastfeeding preterm infants at a neonatal care unit in rural Tanzania2016In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0884-2175, E-ISSN 1552-6909, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 825-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the breastfeeding experiences of mothers with preterm and low-birth-weight infants in a neonatal unit in Tanzania.

    DESIGN: A qualitative research design.

    SETTING: A neonatal unit at a referral hospital in rural Tanzania.

    PARTICIPANTS: Convenience sample of 10 new mothers with preterm infants. Additionally, to triangulate the data, five nurses affiliated with the neonatal unit were interviewed.

    METHODS: A semistructured interview guide was used for data collection. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed with inductive qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: One main category, The mother has to adapt to the new situation to make breastfeeding natural, and three generic categories, The challenges of breastfeeding a premature infant, Enhancing the feeding situation, and The need for support, were used to describe breastfeeding challenges. Challenges consisted of the perception that the infant was different than healthy infants and the infant's and mother's health problems and needs. To improve the feeding situation, mothers learned how to feed their infants using timing strategies. Confidence and security were achieved with support from family and friends, the other mothers, and the health care staff.

    CONCLUSION: Mothers perceived breastfeeding as natural but needed support to overcome the challenges of breastfeeding preterm infants. Through support and education they were empowered, adapted to their new situations, and felt confident with breastfeeding.

  • 13.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Brekke, Hilde
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Relationship of food frequencies as reported by parents to overweight and obesity at 5 years2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate if food frequencies are related to overweight/obesity in 5-year-old children.

    Methods: During 1997–1999, 21 700 infants were invited to participate in ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective, cohort study. Participants were followed from birth (n = 16 058) to 5 years (n = 7356). Food frequencies reported by parents at 2.5 and 5 years were studied in the relation to overweight/obesity at 5 years using multiple logistic regressions. A p-value < 0.01 was considered statistically significant.

    Results: At 2.5 years frequencies of intake of cheese were positively associated with overweight/obesity at 5 years while porridge, fried potatoes/french fries and cream/crème fraiche showed a negative association. When adjusting for known risk factors, porridge and fried potatoes/french fries remained negatively associated with overweight/obesity. At 5 years, chocolate and lemonade were positively associated with overweight/obesity whereas cream/crème fraiche, pastries and candy were negatively associated. Candy remained negatively associated to overweight/obesity after adjustment for potential confounders.

    Conclusion: Food frequencies do not offer any simple explanation for overweight/obesity. Porridge at 2.5 years may protect against overweight/obesity at 5 years, while lemonade may contribute to overweight. Our finding that fried potatoes/french fries may protect against overweight/obesity is unexpected and must be interpreted with caution. These findings should be confirmed by prospective studies using objective recordings.

  • 14.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Castor, Maria
    Rosander Ek, Charlotte
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hur syskon påverkas av att ha en bror eller syster med diabetes - ett föräldraperspektiv2012In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 41-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dada, S.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    The awareness of primary caregivers in South Africa of the human rights of their children with intellectual disabilities2016In: Child: Care, Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 863-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Besides the right to freedom, human rights can be seen as a basic requirement also for the maintenance of human dignity and the opportunity to thrive – particularly in the case of children with disabilities. It is imperative to explore primary caregivers' awareness of the human rights of their children with intellectual disabilities in view of the role they may play in either facilitating or restricting these rights. This paper explores the awareness of 219 primary caregivers of the human rights of their children with intellectual disabilities.

    Method

    A descriptive survey design was used with a custom-designed questionnaire that employed a deductive content analysis based on the articles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child. Comparisons were drawn between the awareness of primary caregivers from urban and those from rural areas.

    Results

    The majority (85.5%) of participants agreed that their child with intellectual disability had rights. Three broad kinds of right were mentioned (in descending order): provision rights, protection rights and participation rights. Participants from both urban and rural areas mentioned education (a provision right) most frequently. However, participants from urban areas were more aware of the different rights that existed than were their counterparts from rural areas.

    Conclusion

    Primary caregivers in both rural and urban areas are aware of the rights of their children with disabilities, although there are significant differences between them.

  • 16.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Adolescents' experience of living with diabetes2007In: Paediatric Nursing, ISSN 0962-9513, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 29-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Living with diabetes type 1 from an adolescent's perspective2006In: Diabetic medicine: journal of diabetes UK Vol. 23 Suppl. 4: Abstracts of the 19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 3-7 December 2006., 2006, p. 261-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bornman, J.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Human rights of children with intellectual disabilities: comparing self-ratings and proxy ratings2015In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1010-1017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A child rights-based approach to research articulates well with Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and highlights the importance and value of including children's own views about aspects that concern them. The aim of this study is to compare children with intellectual disability's own ratings (as self-raters) to those of their primary caregivers (as proxy raters) regarding human rights of children. The study also aims to establish whether there is an inter-rater agreement between the self-raters and proxy raters concerning Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Method

    This study is nested in a larger study examining the human rights of children with intellectual disability in South Africa. In total, 162 children with intellectual disability from 11 schools across three provinces and their primary caregivers participated by answering parts of a Children'sRightsQuestionnaire (CRQ) developed by the researchers based on the United Nation's CRC. We compared the answers for six questions in the questionnaire that were addressed to self-raters (children) and proxy raters (primary caregivers) in the same way.

    Results

    Questions regarding basic needs, such as access to clean water or whether the child had food to eat at home, were answered similarly by self-raters and proxy raters. Larger differences were found when self-raters and proxy raters were asked about whether the child had things or friends to play with at home. Socio-economic variables seemed to affect whether self-raters and proxy raters answered similarly.

    Conclusion

    The results underscore the importance of promoting children's rights to express themselves by considering the opinions of both the children as self-raters and their primary caregivers as proxy raters – not only the latter. The results indicate that it is especially important to include children's own voices when more complex needs are surveyed. Agreement between self- and proxy ratings could be affected by socio-economic circumstances.

  • 19.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study2008In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 8, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are increasing among children all over the world. Socio-economic factors may influence the development of overweight and obesity in childhood, and it has been proposed that breastfeeding may protect against obesity. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and obesity when potential confounders, such as socioeconomic factors, are considered. METHODS: The data analyzed was from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. All parents with children born between October 1, 1997 and October 1, 1999 in Southeast Sweden (n = 21,700) were asked to participate. Parents were asked to answer periodic questionnaires from the time of the child's birth (n = 16,058) until he/she was five years of age (n = 7,356). Cutoffs for overweight and obesity were defined according to Cole et al, age and gender adjusted. Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was defined as < 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify variables that predict the child's BMI (Body Mass Index) at five years of age. RESULTS: At five years of age, 12.9% of the children in the study were overweight and 4.3% were obese. At the age of three months, 78.4% of the children were being breastfed exclusively. The median exclusive breastfeeding duration was four months. High maternal BMI > 30 (AOR = 1.07; CI = 1.05-1.09; P < 0.001), maternal smoking (AOR = 1.43; CI = 1.05-1.95; P = 0.023) and being a single parent (AOR = 2.10; CI = 1.43-3.09; P < 0.001) were associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (less than 4 months). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was less common if one of the parents had a university degree (Mother: AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.61-0.90; P = 0.003 Father: AOR = 0.73; CI = 0.58-0.92; P = 0.008) or if the father was more than 37 years old (AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.55-0.99; P = 0.045). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was associated with obesity in five-year-old children (simple logistic regression: OR = 1.44; CI = 1.00-2.07; P = 0.050), but when including other independent factors in the analysis, short-term exclusive breastfeeding did not attain statistical significance. CONCLUSION: We cannot exclude the possibility that exclusive breastfeeding influences weight development, but it does not seem to protect against obesity at five years of age.

  • 20.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Risk factors in childhood obesity: findings from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 9, p. 1321-1325Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ngoc, Luc Dang
    Da Nang University of Medical Technology and Pharmacy, Viet Nam.
    Dam, Kim An
    Da Nang University of Medical Technology and Pharmacy, Viet Nam.
    Ljusegren, Gunilla
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Caring for children in pain: a Vietnamese perspective2016In: Annals of Nursing and Practice, ISSN 2379-9501, Vol. 3, no 7, article id 1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe Vietnamese nurse’s pain management in children.

    Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional study using a questionnaire measuring 110 registered Vietnamese nurse’s perception of pain and pain management in children.

    Results: The results showed that many nurses in Vietnam are using pain assessment instruments as well as non-pharmacological alleviations methods extensively. Vietnamese nurses had high levels of knowledge in physiology of pain. Nurses’ knowledge about the use of pain medication was correlated to attitudes. The higher level of knowledge the nurses had about pain medication, the more positive was their attitude towards pain management in general.

    Conclusion: In conclusion, the most commonly used non-pharmacology pain alleviation method among the nurses was talking to the child and be close to the child. This method to attempt to relive pain is valuable as it doesn’t require any specific equipment. Vietnamese nurses had high levels of knowledge about physiology of pain.

  • 22.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Olsson, Lena M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Kristianstad University.
    Perceived needs among parents of children with a mild intellectual disability in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 307-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents of children with a mild intellectual disability experience more distress and require more support than other parents. The aim was to investigate the perceived family needs of parents of children with an MID and to investigate the relationship between parents’ perceived self-efficacy in their parental role and in collaborating with professionals as well as with their perceived needs for support. Interviews were based on questionnaires to the parents of 38 children. The results revealed that parents perceived need for information, respite, and venues in which to meet other parents in similar situations. The informational needs were related to parental self-efficacy and obtaining support. A lower need for information was related to higher perceived control over services. In conclusion, it appears that professionals need to work to strengthen parents’ ability to ask for support and to express the needs. Well-informed parents will develop stronger parental self-efficacy and perceived control over services.

  • 23.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University and University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University and Östergötland County Council, Sweden.
    Physical Activity, Blood Glucose and C-Peptide in Healthy School-Children, a Longitudinal Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0156401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To further elucidate the relationship between physical activity and several risk factors for development of diabetes (glucose, C-peptide and obesity) over time.

    Methods

    A prospective longitudinal study where physical activity was measured on 199 children from Kalmar and Linköping at age 8, and the same 107 children from Linköping again at age 12. Anthropometric data was collected and blood was analyzed for C-peptide and f-glucose. The children in the study were representative for the general Swedish child population, and on an average lean.

    Results

    High physical activity was related to lower C-peptide at age 8 and 12. This correlation was especially pronounced in boys, who also were more physically active than girls at both time points. The association seen at 8 years of age was similar at age 12 in most children. Children with higher BMI Z-Score had a higher fasting C-peptide (age 12) but linear regression showed that children with more steps per day were less likely to have a higher fasting C-peptide irrespective of BMI. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a decrease in physical activity increased insulin resistance and β-cell load.

    Conclusions

    Already in young children, physical activity improves insulin sensitivity and decreases the need of C-peptide over time. This seems to become even more pronounced with increasing age when children are followed longitudinally. Low physical activity increases the load on insulin producing β-cells, might increase the risk for both type 1- and 2 diabetes.

  • 24. Ludvigsson, Johnny
    et al.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Eklöv, Kristina
    Klintström, Rebecka
    Lahdenperä, Anne
    Fasting plasma glucose levels in healthy preschool children: effects of weight and lifestyle.2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 706-709Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2018In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

    METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

    RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

    CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 26.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Factors Associated With Participation and Change Over Time in Domestic Life, Peer Relations, and School for Adolescents With and Without Self-Reported Neurodevelopmental Disorders. A Follow-Up Prospective Study2018In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, p. 1-13, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though participation in everyday events is a vital part in the fulfilment of human rights, adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders often face participation restrictions in every-day activities. Few studies have investigated the predictors for participation in different contexts, over time and in relation to the same outcome variables. The objective of the current study was therefore to investigate predictors of change in participation operationalized as frequency of attendance and perceived importance in domestic life activities, peer related activities, and school activities as experienced by adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders. Method: Associations with participation, both in terms of frequency and perceived importance, in domestic life, peer relations, and the school setting were investigated using six independent variables measuring experience of time and self, sex, age, stress, support from siblings, and atmosphere in family at two-time (with approximately 2 years in between). The sample consisted of adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders (n= 916). Adolescents with self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders were n=154 and adolescents without self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders was n= 762. Data was collected via self-reported questionnaires administered in schools. Results: Three key findings are presented. 1) more factors were associated with participation outcomes at time1 for adolescents without NDD than for adolescents with NDD, but this difference in the number of factors decreases with time; 2) few associations were related to time for both adolescents with and without NDD; and 3) patterns of predicting variables were different for adolescents with and without NDD. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the factors related to participation in and outside school differs between groups, when the impairment or disability is not considered as a predictor for participation. This study supports the need for using a multidimensional developmental and contextual perspective in addressing enhanced participation for adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • 27.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for Augumentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augumentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    A Systematic review of Generic and Special Needs of Children with Disabilities Living in Poverty Settings in Low- and Middle-Income Countries2013In: Journal of Policy Practice, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 296-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with disabilities living in poverty settings in low and middle-income countries are particularly in need of special support designed to meet the needs occurring in an environment where poverty is prevalent and resources are scarce. This paper presents a systematic review of the needs of children with disabilities living in poverty settings in low and middle-income countries using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a theoretical framework.  The findings demonstrate that needs at the first level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs are more frequently researched in low and middle-income countries.  Higher order needs should be further explored and children’s own voices should be taken into consideration when performing research, designing policies and services aiming at increased service user empowerment.

  • 28.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kapetanovic, S.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Short-term longitudinal participation trajectories related to domestic life and peer relations for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairmentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for AAC, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hvit, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children’s voices – Differentiating a child perspective from a child’s perspective2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective based on the problem being investigated.

    Methods: Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

    Results: The child's perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective in conjunction with the need to know children's opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult's view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children's capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children's opinions.

    Conclusion: The examples provided indicate that children's opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

  • 30.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Integration of pupils with mild intellectual disability in mainstream school settings - goog or bad for social service utilisation? A longitudinal study among children with mild intellectual disability in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Olsson, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Habilitation service utilization patterns among children with mild intellectual disability2017In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a need for more knowledge about the utilization of habilitation services outside school among children with mild intellectual disability (ID). Specific aims. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of habilitation service utilization among children with mild ID living in Sweden.

    Method

    A quantitative cross-sectional total population study was performed using data from service providers’ existing records.

    Findings

    The most common types of services utilized were those by physicians, counselors, and psychologists. Compared with children with mild ID who were in special classes, children with mild ID who were integrated into mainstream classes utilized significantly fewer types of services. Increasing age of the child was associated with a lower number of service types utilized. Children integrated into mainstream classes were significantly less likely to utilize habilitation services than children attending special classes. The likelihood of utilizing habilitation services decreased with age. Approximately two-thirds of the children utilized habilitation services.

    Discussion

    It is urgent that integration/inclusion in one organizational system, that is, school, does not result in exclusion in another system, such as pediatric habilitation services, which also aim to promote active participation in society. Pediatric habilitation professionals, teachers, and health units at schools need to interact in a manner so that children with mild ID, independent of type of school setting, have access to disability-related services outside school.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-26 00:00
  • 32.
    Olsson, Lena M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Social service utilisation patterns among children with mild intellectual disability – differences between children integrated into mainstream classes and children in self-contained classes2015In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 220-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Children with a mild intellectual disability (ID) and their families often require social services; however, because of the characteristics of the formal service system, these families may be at risk of not receiving necessary services. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge regarding the types and number of services that families receive from social services because of the child’s disability and because of social problems. Another aim was to acquire knowledge regarding the percentage of families receiving services and to evaluate the received services in relation to the child’s gender, school setting and age. Method. Utilisation of social services among 84 children with a mild ID and their families in two municipalities in Sweden was examined using existing social services records. Results. Approximately one-third of the families received services because of the child’s disability and one-fourth because of social problems. Children integrated into mainstream classes were significantly less likely to receive services from social services because of their disability than children in self-contained classes. The most commonly utilised services because of the child’s disability were companion service, short period of supervision for schoolchildren and special transportation services. The services most utilised because of social problems were help from a personal contact, a contact family for the child’s siblings and financial assistance for the child’s parents. Conclusions. Social services must engage in outreach activities, especially in schools, so that families having a child with mild ID are recognised and receive necessary services.

  • 33.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences and Division of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Samulesson, Ulf
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Sweden.
    Impact of type 1 diabetes on health-related quality of life among 8–18-year-old children2016In: Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing, ISSN 2469-4193, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is one way to understand an individual’s perspective on health, and, more specifically, how type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects a child’s everyday life. Early detection of poor HRQOL is considered a crucial factor for identifying children who are at risk of psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to describe the differences in the HRQOL of children with T1D according to age, gender, and metabolic control (HbA1c). Cross-sectional data were collected from children with T1D using the DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure-37 (DCGM-37) and the diabetes specific module (DM-10). Non-parametric tests were used to investigate differences. There were differences between girls and boys, and girls reported lower HRQOL than boys (HRQOL total score: mean 74 and 67 respectively; p = .005). Adolescents described more worries and fears about the future compared with younger children. Children with poor metabolic control reported a lower HRQOL than those with better metabolic control (HRQOL total score:mean 68 and 76 respectively; p = .006), but the social dimensions were not affected. The findings of the present study elucidate the importance for paediatric nurses to explore potential problems in children with T1D and use this knowledge in clinical practice. Assessment of the HRQOL can provide the patient’s perspective on the quality of diabetes care. The HRQOL is correlated with HbA1c, gender, and age, and the HRQOL as well as HbA1c levels should be regularly assessed to establish a comprehensive care for children with T1D.

  • 34.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköpings universitet.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Use of the national quality registry to monitor health-related quality of life of children with type 1 diabetes: A pilot study2015In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of diabetes is complicated, as treatment affects the everyday life of both children and their families. To enable optimal care for children with type 1 diabetes, it is important to highlight health-related quality of life (HrQoL) as well as medical outcomes to detect psychological problems that otherwise could be missed. The aim was to study HrQoL in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes dependent on gender, age and co-morbidity and to study the consistency between children’s self-reporting and parents’ proxy reporting. The cross-sectional data were collected using the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure and the DISABKIDS diabetes module. Parents in the proxy report perceived their children’s HrQoL to be lower than children themselves. Boys reported their HrQoL to be better than girls. Results show that living with an additional disease has an impact on the HrQoL, which is an important factor to consider in the quality registry. Assessing HrQoL on a routine basis may facilitate detection and discussion of HrQoL-related questions in the national quality registry.

  • 35.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life during a patient encounter2016In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 424-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has been stated that care for children with chronic health conditions tends to focus on condition-specific issues rather than how these children experience their health and everyday life functioning.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life applied during a patient encounter.

    Methods

    Prior to the start of the study, a clinical intervention based on the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure (DCGM-37) was performed. A qualitative explorative design was chosen, and 25 children between 10–17 years of age were interviewed after the consultation at four different paediatric outpatient clinics. Data were analysed according to qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The results were twofold: children experienced that the assessment was providing them with insights about their health, which motivated them to make lifestyle changes. When outcomes were discussed and requested, the children felt encouraged.

    Conclusions

    The use of an assessment of health-related quality of life may promote insights about health and encourage children with chronic health conditions to discuss their outcomes with healthcare professionals.

  • 36.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    To promote child involvement – healthcare professionals' use of a health-related quality of life assessment tool during paediatric encounters2017In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children and healthcare professionals should be provided with easy-to-use tools which could lead to actionable results.

    Objectives: There is increasing interest in the use of patient reported outcomes to aid management of individual care; therefore, the use of health-related qualityof life (HRQOL) assessments during consultations need to be studied. The aim of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals use a HRQOL assessment tool during paediatric encounters.

    Design: A descriptive, explorative design with a qualitative approach based on video recordings was chosen.

    Methods: Twenty-one video recordings, from nine different healthcare professionals’ consultations where an assessment tool of HRQOL were used were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: The healthcare professionals were using different strategies and when they combined these strategies three approaches emerged. The instructing approach was characterized by healthcare professionals giving a summary of the results, leading to children becoming passive bystanders in the encounter. Based on an inviting approach, the children’s perceptions of their situation were requested while the items were explored. This resulted in involving the children in the conversations. In the engaging approach, an open dialogue and a common interpretation were sought to guide further care which was interpreted as children becoming actively involved.

    Conclusions: The child’s involvement could be facilitated depending on which approach is being used. When an inviting and engaging approach is used, actions in a non-linear set of interactions is co-produced with the child.

    Relevance to practice: The use of an HRQOL assessment tool change the management during consultations and could promote child involvement dependent on which approach the healthcare professionals are using.

  • 37.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Comparing children's self-report instruments for health-related quality of life using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY)2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with chronic conditions often experience a long treatment which can be complex and negatively impacts the child's well-being. In planning treatment and interventions for children with chronic conditions, it is important to measure health-related quality of life (HrQoL). HrQoL instruments are considered to be a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) and should be used in routine practice. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the content dimensions of HrQoL instruments for children's self-reports using the framework of ICF-CY. Method: The sample consist of six instruments for health-related quality of life for children 5 to 18 years of age, which was used in the Swedish national quality registries for children and adolescents with chronic conditions. The following instruments were included: CHQ-CF, DCGM-37, EQ-5D-Y, KIDSCREEN-52, Kid-KINDL and PedsQL 4.0. The framework of the ICF-CY was used as the basis for the comparison. Results: There were 290 meaningful concepts identified and linked to 88 categories in the classification ICF-CY with 29 categories of the component body functions, 48 categories of the component activities and participation and 11 categories of the component environmental factors. No concept were linked to the component body structures. The comparison revealed that the items in the HrQoL instruments corresponded primarily with the domains of activities and less with environmental factors. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results confirm that ICF-CY provide a good framework for content comparisons that evaluate similarities and differences to ICF-CY categories. The results of this study revealed the need for greater consensus of content across different HrQoL instruments. To obtain a detailed description of children's HrQoL, DCGM-37 and KIDSCREEN-52 may be appropriate instruments to use that can increase the understanding of young patients' needs.

  • 38.
    Wennick, Anne
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    What it is like being a sibling of a child newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes: an interview study2012In: European Diabetes Nursing, ISSN 1551-7853, E-ISSN 1551-7861, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 88-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous studies have stressed that having a brother or sister with a chronic condition may affect the healthy sibling, few have specifically focused on healthy siblings of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Hence, this study aimed to illuminate what it is like to be a brother or sister of a child newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    Individual interviews were conducted with seven siblings aged 10–17 years (median=12) from six different families. Each interview was analysed using content analysis.

    Three different categories emerged – Living differently, Being concerned and Participating in caring for the affected child – indicating that, for the healthy sibling, the illness entails a transformed everyday life including worry about the affected child and the need to help in the home.

    In conclusion, the paediatric health care service may need to develop new strategies to meet the siblings' desired level of knowledge in educational team sessions related to diabetes. As the sibling relationship is probably the longest one that an affected child will experience in her/his lifetime, it is worth investing in it to promote this long-term support resource.

1 - 38 of 38
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