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  • 1.
    Andersson, David Emanuel
    et al.
    National Yat-sen University, Taiwan.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Analysing Creative Cities2011In: Handbook of Creative Cities / [ed] David Emanuel Andersson, Åke E. Andersson, Charlotta Mellander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, p. 3-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    National Yat-sen University, Taiwan.
    Mellander, CharlottaJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.Andersson, Åke EJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Handbook of Creative Cities2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the publication of The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida in 2002, the ‘creative city’ became the new hot topic among urban policymakers, planners and economists. Florida has developed one of three path-breaking theories about the relationship between creative individuals and urban environments. The economist Åke E. Andersson and the psychologist Dean Simonton are the other members of this ‘creative troika’. In the Handbook of Creative Cities, Florida, Andersson and Simonton appear in the same volume for the first time. The expert contributors in this timely Handbook extend their insights with a varied set of theoretical and empirical tools. The diversity of the contributions reflect the multidisciplinary nature of creative city theorizing, which encompasses urban economics, economic geography, social psychology, urban sociology, and urban planning. The stated policy implications are equally diverse, ranging from libertarian to social democratic visions of our shared creative and urban future.

  • 3.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, The Prosperity Institute of Scandinavia (PIS).
    Gabe, Todd
    University of Maine, USA.
    Effects of human Capital on the growth and survival of Swedish businesses2016In: Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, ISSN 1090-4999, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 22-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the effects of human capital on the growth and survival of a large sample of Swedish businesses. Human capital is represented by conventional measures of the educational attainment and experience of an establishment’s workers and skills-based measures of the types of occupations present in the company. Controlling for an establishment’s size and age, as well as its industry and region of location, we find that the human capital embodied in a company’s workers affects its performance. The specific effects, however, depend on how human capital is measured and whether the analysis focuses on growth or survival.

  • 4.
    Bjerke, Lina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Moving home again? Never! The locational choices of graduates in Sweden2017In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 707-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two major challenges in Europe’s rural areas are an aging population and the diminishing share of human capital. While this pattern has been occurring for a long time, the effects are becoming acutely visible and impactful. The long-term loss of younger individuals has in many ways “drained” the labor market and the economic market power of rural areas. This is the context of our research: the locational choice of university graduates from an urban–rural perspective. Using micro data covering the entire Swedish population, we identify all university graduates from the year 2001. We analyze them with respect to whether they live in a rural or urban region before starting university and where they live after graduation at two points in time: 5 and 10 years. We use a series of multinomial logit regressions to determine what factors affect their short-term and long-term choices of location. We find that having children is one of the most influential factors for moving back home after graduation, irrespective of type of region. We find only minor differences between the two time perspectives.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Sören
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Ekonomisk geografi.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    An emerging logistic cluster: value chain and cluster approach2006In: IGU-Commission on Dynamics of Economic Spaces: Auckland 27 June-1 July, 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    There Goes the Neighborhood: How and Why Bohemians, Artists and Gays Affect Regional Housing ValuesManuscript (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often conjectured that artistic, bohemian, and gay populations increase housing values in the neighborhoods and communities in which they reside. But these groups are small, and the evidence of their effect on housing prices is anecdotal and limited. We argue that artists, bohemians and gays affect housing values through two kinds of mechanisms: an aesthetic-amenity premium; and a tolerance or open culturepremium. To examine this, we introduce a combined measure of bohemian and gay populations – the Bohemian-Gay Index. We conduct statistical analyses to test the performance of this measure against other variables expected to affect housing values– income, wages, technology, and human capital. The findings indicate that the Bohemian-Gay Index has a substantial direct relation with housing values across all permutations of the model and across all region sizes. It remains positive andsignificant alongside variables for regional income, wages, technology, and human capital. The Bohemian-Gay Index also has a substantial direct correlation with other key variables, particularly income, indicating an additional indirect effect on housing values.

  • 7.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, Martin Prosperity Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Adler, Patrick
    Department of Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    The city as innovation machine2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 86-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper puts cities and urban regions at the very centre of the processes of innovation and entrepreneurship. It combines the insights of Jane Jacobs and recent urban research on the role of the city with the literature on innovation and entrepreneurship going back to Joseph Schumpeter. Innovation and entrepreneurship and their geography privileges the firm, industry clusters and/or the individual and poses the city as a container for them. By marrying Jacobs’ insights on cities to those of Schumpeter on innovation, it is argued that innovation and entrepreneurship do not simply take in place in cities but in fact require them.

  • 8.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto & New York University.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Innovation, Skill, and Economic Segregation2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our research examines the role of innovation and skill on the level economic segregation across U.S. metro areas. On the one hand, economic and urban theory suggest that more innovative and skilled metros are likely to have higher levels of economic segregation. But on the other hand, theory also suggests that more segregated metros are likely to become less innovative over time. We examine the connection between innovation and economic segregation this via OLS regressions informed by a Principal Component Analysis to distill key variables related to innovation, knowledge and skills, while controlling for other key variables notably population size. Our findings are mixed. While we find evidence of an association between the level of innovation and skill and the level of economic segregation in 2010, we find little evidence of an association between the level of innovation and skill across metros and the growth of economic segregation between 2000 and 2010.

  • 9.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Rise of the startup city: The changing geography of the venture capital financed innovation2016In: California Management Review, ISSN 0008-1256, E-ISSN 2162-8564, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 14-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevailing geographic model for high-technology industrial organization has been the “nerdistan,” a sprawling, car-oriented suburb organized around office parks. This seems to contradict a basic insight of urban theory, which associates dense urban centers with higher levels of innovation, entrepreneurship, and creativity. This article examines the geography of recent venture capital finance startups across U.S. metros and within a subset of them by neighborhood. It concludes that the model is changing. The suburban model might have been a historical aberration, and innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship are realigning in the same urban centers that traditionally fostered them.

  • 10.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Segregated city: The geography of economic segregation in America's metros2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Americans have become increasingly sorted over the past couple of decades by income, education, and class. A large body of research has focused on the dual migrations of more affluent and skilled people and the less advantaged across the United States. Increasingly, Americans are sorting not just between cities and metro areas, but within them as well.

    This study examines the geography of economic segregation in America. While most previous studies of economic segregation have generally focused on income, this report examines three dimensions of economic segregation: by income, education, and occupation. It develops individual and combined measures of income, educational, and occupational segregation, as well as an Overall Economic Segregation Index, and maps them across the more than 70,000 Census tracts that make up America’s 350-plus metros. In addition, it examines the key economic, social, and demographic factors that are associated with them.

  • 11.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Skill and Cross-National Economic Performance2009Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Talent, cities and competitiveness2015In: The Oxford handbook of local competitiveness / [ed] David B. Audretsch, Albert N. Link, and Mary Lindenstein Walshok, New York: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 34-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto & New York University.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    The Geography of Economic Segregation2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the geography of economic segregation in America. Most studies of economic segregation focus on income, but our research develops a new measure of overall economic segregation spanning income, educational, and occupational segregation which we use to examine the economic, social and demographic factors which are associated with economic segregation across US metros. Adding in the two other dimensions of educational and occupational segregation– seems to provide additional, stronger findings with regard to the factors that are associated with economic segregation broadly. Our findings suggest that several key factors are associated with economic segregation. Across the board, economic segregation is associated with larger, denser, more affluent, and more knowledge based metros. Economic segregation is related to race and to income inequality.

  • 14.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The geography of economic segregation2018In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 7, no 8, article id 123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the key factors that are associated with the geography of economic segregation across US metros. It connects the sociological literature on the extent and variation of economic segregation to the urban economics literature on the factors associated with urban and regional performance. It advances the hypothesis that economic segregation will be greater in larger, denser, more knowledge-based regions as well as in light of racial factors and income inequality. It utilizes measures of Income, Educational, and Occupational Segregation along with a combined measure of Overall Economic Segregation. Our findings are in line with the hypothesis and indicate that economic segregation is associated with larger, denser, more highly educated metros. Economic segregation is also to a certain extent related with race and ethnicity, commuting style, and income inequality. 

  • 15.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    The geography of inequality: Difference and determinants of wage and income inequality across US metros2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the geographic variation in wage inequality and income inequality across US metros. The findings indicate that the two are quite different. Wage inequality is closely associated with skills, human capital, technology and metro size, in line with the literature, but these factors are only weakly associated with income inequality. Furthermore, wage inequality explains only 15% of income inequality across metros. Income inequality is more closely associated with unionization, race and poverty. No relationship is found between income inequality and average incomes and only a modest relationship between it and the percentage of high-income households.

  • 16.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Adler, Patrick
    University of California.
    Creativity in the city2015In: The Oxford handbook of creative industries / [ed] Candace Jones, Mark Lorenzen, Jonathan Sapsed, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 96-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Adler, Patrick
    UCLA.
    The Creative Class Paradigm2011In: Handbook of Creative Cities / [ed] David Emanuel Andersson, Åke E. Andersson, Charlotta Mellander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, p. 56-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Gulden, Tim
    George Mason University.
    Global Metropolis: Assessing Economic Activity in Urban Centers Based on Nighttime Satellite Images2012In: Professional Geographer, ISSN 0033-0124, E-ISSN 1467-9272, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research provides new data and insight onmetropolitan areas worldwide. It summarizes new data, derived from satellite images of the world at night, to provide systematic estimates of the economic activity generated by cities and metropolitan areas worldwide. It identifies 681 global metropolitan areas each with more than 500,000 people. Taken as a whole, these large global metropolitan regions house 24 percent of the world's population but produce 60 percent of global output, measured as light emissions. Asia leads the way in global economic urbanization according to our findings, followed by North America, the emerging economies, and Europe.

  • 19.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Gulden, Tim
    George Mason University.
    Global Metropolis: The Role of Cities and Metropolitan Areas in the Global Economy2009Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, The Prosperity Institute of Scandinavia (PIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Holgersson, Thomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Up in the air: The role of airports for regional economic development2015In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 197-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our research examines the role of airports in regional development. Specifically, we examine two things: (1) the factors associated with whether or not a metro will have an airport, and (2) the effect of airport activities on regional economic development. Based on multiple regression analysis for U.S. metros, our research generates four key findings. First, airports are more likely to be located in larger metros with higher shares of cultural workers and warmer winters. Second, airports add significantly to regional development measured as economic output per capita. Third, the effect of airports on regional development occurs through two channels—their capacity to move both people and cargo, with the former being somewhat more important. Fourth, the impact of airports on regional development varies with their size and scale.

  • 21.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    King, Karen
    Martin Prosperity Institute.
    The Global Creativity Index 20152015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the 2015 edition of the Global Creativity Index, or GCI. The GCI is a broad-based measure for advanced economic growth and sustainable prosperity based on the 3Ts of economic development—talent, technology, and tolerance. It rates and ranks 139 nations worldwide on each of these dimensions and on our overall measure of creativity and prosperity.

  • 22.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Qian, Haifeng
    Cleveland State University.
    China’s Development Disconnect2012In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 628-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China is currently seeking to transform its economic structure from a traditional industrial to a more innovative, human-capital driven, and knowledge-based economy. Our research examines the effects of three key factors on Chinese regional development in an attempt to gauge to what degree China has transformed from an industrial to a knowledge-based economy, based on higher levels of (1) technology and innovation, (2) human capital and knowledge/professional/creative occupations, and (3) factors like tolerance, universities, and amenities which act on the flow of the first two. We employ structural equation models to gauge the effects of these factors on the economic performance of Chinese regions. Our research generates four key findings. First, the distribution of talent (measured both as human capital and as knowledge – professional and creative occupations) is considerably more concentrated than in the US or other advanced economies. Second, universities are the key factor in shaping the distribution both of talent and of technological innovation. Third, tolerance also plays a role in shaping the distribution of talent and technology across Chinese regions. Fourth, and perhaps most strikingly, we find that neither talent nor technology is associated with the economic performance of Chinese regions. This stands in sharp contrast to the pattern in advanced economies and suggests that the Chinese economic model, at least at the time of data collection, appears to be far less driven by the human capital or technology factors that propel more advanced economies. This, in turn, suggests that China is likely to face substantial obstacles in moving from its current industrial stage of development to a more knowledge-based economy.

  • 23.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Rentfrow, Peter J.
    Cambridge University.
    Happy States of America: A state-level analysis of psychological, economic, and social well-being2009Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Rentfrow, Peter J.
    Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK.
    The Happiness of Cities2013In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 613-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the factors that shape the happiness of cities, whereas much of the existent literature has focused on the happiness of nations. It is argued that in addition to income, which has been found to shape national-level happiness, human capital levels will play an important role in the happiness of cities. Metropolitan-level data from the 2009 Gallup–Healthways Survey are used to examine the effects of human capital on city happiness, controlling for other factors. The findings suggest that human capital plays the central role in the happiness of cities, outperforming income and every other variable.

  • 25.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Ritchie, Isabel
    The geography of the global super-rich2016Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Geographies of scope: an empirical analysis of entertainment, 1970-20002012In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 183-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Stolarick, Kevin
    OCAD University, Toronto, Canada.
    Human capital in cities and suburbs2016In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 91-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on talent or human capital generally focuses on the metro level and neglects the relative effects of its distribution between center cities and their surrounding suburbs. This research examines the connection between human capital in urban centers (defined here as principal cities) versus suburbs on the economic performance of US metropolitan areas. The findings indicate that this distribution of human capital has significant connection to metro economic performance, with suburban human capital being more strongly related to performance than human capital in the principal city. This result also varies by metro size.

  • 28.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Inside the Black Box of Regional Development: Human capital, the creative class and tolerance2013In: The Creative Class Goes Global / [ed] Charlotta Mellander, Richard Florida, Bjorn Asheim and Meric Gerler, Routledge, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Rotman School of Management.
    Talent, Technology and Tolerance in Canadian Regional Development2010In: The Canadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien, ISSN 0008-3658, E-ISSN 1541-0064, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 277-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the factors that shape economic development in Canadian regions. It employs path analysis and structural equation models to isolate the effects of technology, human capital and/or the creative class, universities, the diversity of service industries and openness to immigrants, minorities and gay and lesbian populations on regional income. It also examines the effects of several broad occupations groups—business and finance, management, science, arts and culture, education and health care—on regional income. The findings indicate that both human capital and the creative class have a direct effect on regional income. Openness and tolerance also have a significant effect on regional development in Canada. Openness towards the gay and lesbian population has a direct effect on both human capital and the creative class, while tolerance towards immigrants and visible minorities is directly associated with higher regional incomes. The university has a relatively weak effect on regional incomes and on technology as well. Management, business and finance and science occupations have a sizeable effect on regional income; arts and culture occupations have a significant effect on technology; health and education occupations have no effect on regional income.

  • 30.
    Florida, Richard
    et al.
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Ross, Adrienne
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Cities, skills and wages2012In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 355-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the effect of skills in cities on regional wages. We use cluster analysis to identify three broad skill types—analytical, social intelligence and physical skills from 87 occupational skills. We examine how each skill contributes to regional wages and how they are related to regional size, using data from 1999 and 2008. We find that analytical and social intelligence skills have a significant positive effect on regional wages, while physical skills have a negative effect. Analytical skills are also somewhat more closely associated with regional wages than social intelligence skills, after controlling for education, industry, immigration and regional size. Furthermore, wage return to analytical and social intelligence skills has increased over time, and the return to physical skills has declined significantly. We also show that larger cities reward analytical and social intelligence skills to a higher degree, whereas smaller cities rely more on physical skills.

  • 31.
    Gabe, Todd
    et al.
    University of Maine.
    Florida, Richard
    University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Creative Class and the crisis2013In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 37-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The economic crisis contributed to sharp increases in US unemployment rates for all three of the major socio-economic classes. Results from regression models using individual-level data from the 2006–2011 US Current Population Surveys indicate that members of the Creative Class had a lower probability of being unemployed over this period than individuals in the Service and Working Classes and that the impact of having a creative occupation became more beneficial in the 2 years following the recession. These patterns, if they continue, are suggestive of a structural change occurring in the US economy—one that favours knowledge-based creative activities.

  • 32.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Paulsson, T
    A Spatial ICT Clusters in Sweden: An Empirical Method to Identify Necessary Conditions for Existence2004Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Paulsson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Spatial ICT Clusters in Sweden: An Empirical Method to Identify Necessary Conditions for Existence2006In: Entrepreneurship and Dynamics in the Knowledge Economy, New York: Routledge , 2006, p. 257-280Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Kekezi, Orsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Geography and Media: Does a Local Editorial Office Increase the Consumption of Local News?2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Urbanization and new digital technologies have significantly altered the news media industry. One major change is the disappearance of local editorial offices in many regions. This paper examines if there is a relation between access to local media in terms of editorial offices and journalists, and the likelihood of the public consuming local news. The study builds on fine level data for Sweden in 2006 and in 2013, allowing for a comparison of trends. Our results suggest that the existence of an editorial office in the municipality is not significantly related to the consumption of local newspapers but that accessibility to employed journalists who live in the municipality is.

  • 35.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    In search of services in the market place: A probability of presence approach for retail services in Sweden2012In: Innovative Marketing, ISSN 1814-2427, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the probability of finding a number retail services in Swedish municipalities with respect to theirmarket potential. In particular, the authors investigate how different degrees of market potential affects the presence ofcertain retail activities in central and non-central municipalities in Sweden. Using a probabilistic approach, the resultssuggest that, for both central and non-central municipalities, the probability of finding certain retail services dependsheavily on the market potential within the municipality. The size of the external market is determined to have a varyingimpact depending both on the size of the market place, and the type of the retail branch investigated.

  • 36.
    Lobo, Jose
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Stolarick, Kevin
    Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, Univeristy of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Strumsky, Deborah
    Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA.
    The Inventive, the Educated and the Creative: How Do They Affect Metropolitan Productivity?2014In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 155-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longstanding research tradition assumes that endogenous technological development increases regional productivity. It has been assumed that measures of regional patenting activity or human capital are an adequate way to capture the endogenous creation of new ideas that result in productivity improvements. This process has been conceived as occurring in two stages. First, an invention or innovation is generated, and then it is developed and commercialized to create benefits for the individual or firm owning the idea. Typically these steps are combined into a single model of the "invention in/productivity out" variety. Using data on Gross Metropolitan Product per worker and on inventors, educational attainment, and creative workers (together with other important socioeconomic controls), we unpack the model back to the two-step process and use a SEM modeling framework to investigate the relationships among inventive activity and potential inventors, regional technology levels, and regional productivity outcomes. Our results show almost no significant direct relationship between invention and productivity, except through technology. Clearly, the simplification of the "invention in/productivity out" model does not hold, which supports other work that questions the use of patents and patenting related measures as meaningful innovation inputs to processes that generate regional productivity and productivity gains. We also find that the most effective measure of regional inventive capacity, in terms of its effect on technology, productivity, and productivity growth is the share of the workforce engaged in creative activities.

  • 37.
    Martin, Roger
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Florida, Richard
    University of Toronto.
    Pogue, Melissa
    University of Toronto.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Creativity, clusters and the competitive advantage of cities2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article marries Michael Porter’s industrial cluster theory of traded and local clusters to Richard Florida’s occupational approach of creative and routine workers to gain a better understanding of the process of economic development. By combining these two approaches, four major industrial-occupational categories are identified. The shares of U.S. Employment in each –creative-in-traded, creative-in-local, routine-in-traded and routine-in-local – are calculated and a correlation analysis is used to examine the relationship of each to regional economic development indicators. Our findings show that economic growth and development is positively related to employment in the creative-in-traded category. While metros with a higher share of creative-in-traded employment enjoy higher wages and incomes overall, these benefits are not experienced by all worker categories. The share of creative-in-traded employment is also positively and significantly associated with higher inequality. After accounting for higher median housing costs, routine workers in both traded and local industries are found to be relatively worse off in metros with high shares of creative-in-traded employment, on average

  • 38.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Creative and Knowledge Industries: An Occupational Distribution Approach2009In: Economic development quarterly, ISSN 0891-2424, E-ISSN 1552-3543, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 294-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the discussion around so-called creative industries. Up until now, most definitions have been based on the final product rather than the actual processes within the firms. This work is an attempt to increase the knowledge about what is going on within industries. We use a micro data set, including all private firms and all individuals employed by those firms, to identify the exact occupational distribution within Swedish industries. Furthermore, a debate has questioned whether creative individuals are separated from the highly educated. In this work, therefore, education level is separated from occupational task.

  • 39.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Introducing a New Technology: The Location and Diffusion Process of ICTManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector in Sweden during its development boom from 1990 - 2000, with a focus on locationand diffusion, using Stockholm and Jönköping as reference leader and follower region. The location and diffusion pattern of firms within the sector is analyzed, based on a telephone interview survey. According to theory, new, non-standardized techniques are frequently initiated and promoted in leader regions. In order to leave space for new activities, standardized and maturing techniques must gradually beremoved from the leading region to follower regions. Also, non-standardized ICT products and ICT services are assumed to be distance sensitive; that is, there is a need for close contacts between buyer and seller for production and consumption, increasing the importance of the nearby local market. The results show that the ICT industry was introduced earlier and faster in the Stockholm region. There was a significant difference in the software/hardware ratio between the regions, and Stockholm had a significantly larger share of its production within the ICT service sector. The Stockholm firms also had considerably more spin-offs and multi establishments.

  • 40.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Landskrona: En attraktiv plats att vara och bo på?2009Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Occupational Distribution within Swedish Industries: an identification and market relation analysis2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Occupational Distribution within Swedish Industries: An Identification and Market Relation AnalysisManuscript (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sheds new light on the Swedish industry structure, by defining it through its occupational and educational structure. It is a merge of all Swedish private firmsand all individuals employed within those firms, aggregated over industry, for theyear 2001. Education is separated from creative occupations, and we also identify industries with the largest concentration of service and manufacturing occupations.The growth pattern within the industry segments between 1993 and 2001 is provided, and an examination of the spatial distribution. While there is a closerelation between larger markets and knowledge, creative and service industries, wecan detect a weaker link to the manufacturing industries. The effect from being located in the main urban area within the urban region, as well as within one of the three metropolitan regions, is highly significant for all industries, but relativelyweaker for the manufacturing industry. The results also imply that diversity andcreativity, in terms of the number of establishments, closely relate to the metropolitan regions. The concentration of activities, in terms of the number of employees, is more driven by large markets in general.

  • 43.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Talent, Technology and Regional Wage Levels in SwedenManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is consensus on the importance of human capital to economicdevelopment, debate takes shape around two central issues. First, how is humancapital best measured? Second, there is debate over the factors that yield thegeographic distribution of human capital in the first place. With regard to the firstquestion, this work reveals that occupational or “creative class” measures tend tooutperform educational measures in accounting for regional wages per capita acrossour sample of Swedish regions. In view of the second question, universities, servicediversity, and tolerance affect the distribution of human capital, though in differentways and thus play complimentary roles in the geographic distribution of talent.

  • 44.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The Wealth of Urban Regions: On the Location of Creative Individuals and Firms2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis consists of four individual chapters and an introduction to the thesis. The common feature of the four separate chapters is their focus on the location patterns of creative individuals and firms, the inter-relation between those actors and the regional development and how those actors in the end shape the wealth of urban regions.

    The first chapter deals with what happens after a new technology is introduced with a focus on the geographical location and distribution.  The assumption is that new, non-standardized techniques frequently are initiated and promoted in large urban regions. In order to leave space for new activities, standardized and maturing techniques must gradually be moved to medium and small sized regions.

    The second chapter analyzes the occupational distribution within Swedish industries, on the basis of characteristics of the individuals they employ. This chapter focuses especially on how to best identify so-called creative industries. It also examines the location patterns of the different types of industries.

    The third chapter focuses on the role of different types of talent, as well as on factors that shape the distribution of talent across regions. A main theme is the role of universities, tolerance and service diversity. The chapter also examines the economic effect from those factors in combination with talent and technology.

    The last essay investigates the relationship between tolerance and openness on one hand, and regional housing values on the other. It argues that artists, bohemians and gays affect housing values through two kinds of mechanisms: an aesthetic-amenity premium and a tolerance or open culture premium.

  • 45.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Adler, Patrick
    Rotman School of Management.
    The Baltic Sea Regions? : BSR Performance According to the Three T’s of DevelopmentIn: Polaris: Navigating Transnational Innovation and Cluster PoliciesChapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Alpfält, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Kvinnor cch företagsstöd – en kartläggning och analys av sannolikheten att få sin ansökan beviljad2012Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Andersson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Ekonomi, attraktivitet och stadsutveckling2009Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    De ungas flykt till staden2017In: Att äga framtiden: Perspektiv på kommunal utveckling / [ed] Josefina Syssner, Sören Häggroth & Ulf Ramberg, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, p. 195-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Florida, Richard
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    Introduction: The Creative Class Goes Global2014In: The Creative ClassGoes Global / [ed] Charlotta Mellander, Richard Florida, Bjorn Asheim and Meric Gerler, Routledge, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Florida, Richard
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    The Creative Class Around the World2014In: The Creative Class Goes Global / [ed] Charlotta Mellander,Richard Florida, Bjorn Asheim and Meric Gerler, Routledge, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 77
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