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  • 1.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Division of Nursing, Department of Health and Learning, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Health and Learning, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Division of Nursing, Department of Health and Learning, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket – Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer.

    Method Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach.

    Results One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life.

    Conclusion There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process.

  • 2.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The process of striving for an ordinary, everyday life, in young children living with cancer, at six months and one year post diagnosis2014In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 605-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Health care focus is shifting from solely looking at surviving cancer to elements of attention relating to living with it on a daily basis.The young child's experiences are crucial to providing evidence based care. The aim of this study was to explore the everyday life of young children as expressed by the child and parents at six months and one year post diagnosis.

    METHODS: Interviews were conducted with children and their parents connected to a paediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden. A qualitative content analysis of interview data from two time points, six months and one year post diagnosis, was carried out.

    RESULTS: The process of living with cancer at six months and at one year post diagnosis revealed the child's striving for an ordinary, everyday life. Experiences over time of gaining control, making a normality of the illness and treatment and feeling lonely were described.

    CONCLUSION: Nurses have a major role to play in the process of striving for a new normal in the world post-diagnosis, and provide essential roles by giving the young child information, making them participatory in their care and encouraging access to both parents and peers. Understanding this role and addressing these issues regularly can assist the young child in the transition to living with cancer. Longitudinal studies with young children are vital in capturing their experiences through the cancer trajectory and necessary to ensure quality care.

  • 3.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    ICF applications in health care for children with cancer in Sweden2017In: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 178-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and its version for children and youth, the ICF-CY, can contribute to the present knowledge on the lives of young children with cancer, with an international and interdisciplinary language. In this context, the term health can be seen as a multidimensional concept in which both illness and non-illness/well-being are dimensions that can be present at the same time, rather than two opposite concepts. Health is the result of a continuous process rather than something that one individual has; it is a resource for everyday life rather than the objective of living (WHO, 1986). The ICF was developed to classify different dimensions on individuals’ health as a unified standardised common language and framework, to be used across disciplines (WHO, 2007). It acknowledges that health and illness are complex concepts and promotes a biopsychosocial model of health, in which the context is as important as the individual and his/her needs. The view of health as functioning in everyday life can be operationalised using the ICF model of body structure, body function, activities and participation and environmental factors (Rosenbaum & Gorter, 2012).

  • 4.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Following young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory2016In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge of living with childhood cancer, through the trajectory, is sparse.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to follow young children’s health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory.

    Methods: Data were gathered longitudinally from a group of 13 young children and their parents connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth structure was used to identify difficulties in health and functioning in everyday life, in interview and questionnaire data. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to show patterns of difficulty over a 3-year period from diagnosis.

    Results: Difficulties experienced by children declined and changed over time. An increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to and support from health care professionals was seen 2 to 3 years after diagnosis and start of treatment. Similar patterns are seen within individual children’s trajectories in relation to diagnosis but individual patterns were seen for each child.

    Conclusions and Clinical Implications: Health care professionals need to plan for ongoing contact with school services and information and support pathways, beyond the treatment period. A person-centered philosophy of care is required throughout the cancer trajectory.

  • 5.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Young children's experiences of living an everyday life with cancer – A three year interview study2019In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The young child's experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. This study explores and describes experiences of everyday life of young children with cancer, over a three year period from diagnosis.

    Method

    This is a longitudinal, inductive interview study with young children with cancer, and their parents. Interviews from shortly after diagnosis, six and 12 months after diagnosis have been reanalysed. Interviews with the same children and their parents from 18 to 36 months after diagnosis have been analysed for the first time in the present paper. A longitudinal temporal analysis at category level for five synchronic data sets forms the basis for the results.

    Results

    The child living with cancer over a three year period is described as a child apart, striving to live an everyday life. This description is built on three categories: I want to be a child like any other, I need security and control and I feel lonely and left out. Young children with cancer actively strive to understand their illness, participate in care and live an ordinary everyday life- but with ongoing feelings of social isolation and loneliness.

    Conclusions

    Young children with cancer need access to and ongoing contact with peers and preschool. A structured follow-up throughout the cancer trajectory and not just during active treatment, is necessary. A child-centred philosophy of care would guide the child towards attainment of health and wellbeing.

  • 6.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Institution of Health Science, University College Borås.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J
    Petersson, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer: documenting with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).2015In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 475-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care focus is shifting for children from surviving childhood cancer to living with it on a daily basis. There is a need to document health and function in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using the multidimensional framework and language of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

    AIMS: The aims of this study were (1) to document health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using ICF-CY codes and (2) to identify a comprehensive code set that can aid clinical assessment.

    METHOD: Interviews with children diagnosed with cancer and their parents, were transcribed, reviewed for content and coded to the ICF-CY using linking procedures.

    RESULTS: A comprehensive code set (n = 70) for childhood cancer was identified. The majority of content identified to codes was related to activity and participation describing social relations with family, peers and professionals, preschool attendance and play, as well as issues related to support and independence.

    CONCLUSIONS: The ICF-CY can be used to document the nature and range of characteristics and consequences of cancer experienced by children. The identified comprehensive code set could be helpful to health care professionals, parents and teachers in assessing and supporting young children's health and everyday life through the cancer trajectory. The comprehensive code set could be developed as a clinical assessment tool for those caring for young children with cancer. The universal language of the ICF-CY means that the utility of a clinical assessment tool based on identified codes can have wide reaching effects for the care of young children with cancer.

  • 7.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Science, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Darcy, Laura
    Department of Health Science, University College Borås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    A Swedish perspective on nursing and psychosocial research in paediatric oncology: A literature review2015In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 310-317Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: A dramatic improvement in outcomes of survival rates of childhood cancer has been seen. Caring science research is central in providing skills and knowledge to the health care sector, but few overviews of the content of published research have been carried out. The aim of this review was to investigate the content and methodology of published studies in paediatric oncology relevant to caring science, and also to compare possible differences in content and method of the published studies from the nursing and psychosocial perspectives.

    METHOD: A systematic literature review was performed of 137 published articles on paediatric oncology relevant to caring science in Sweden.

    RESULTS: The results show that most of the studies were descriptive or comparative ones with a quantitative design. Most of them focused on parents (43%) or children (28%). Most of the studies investigated wellbeing (88%), using questionnaires (54%) or interviews (38%). Several different measurement instruments had been used. While the results were often clearly presented, the clinical implications were more diffuse. The most acknowledged research fund was the Swedish Childhood Foundation (75%).

    CONCLUSIONS: To reflect the children' perspectives in paediatric oncology require that future researchers take on the challenge of including children (even young ones) in research. The use of a limited number of agreed measurement instruments is desirable. The biggest challenge for the future is to make a shift from explorative to intervention studies. There is an urgent need to transform research results into clinical practice.

  • 8.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Science, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Darcy, Laura
    Institution of Health Science, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Institution of Health Science, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    An analytic review of clinical implications from nursing and psychosocial research within Swedish pediatric oncology2015In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Darcy, Laura
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    A literature review of the results from nursing and psychosocial research within Swedish pediatric oncology2014In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 1-8Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The body of research-based knowledge in paediatric caring science has been increasing leading to dramaticimprovements in treatment. The purpose of this manuscript was to analyze results as stated by the researchers', inrecently published articles on nursing and psychosocial research, within Swedish pediatric oncology setting. Thiswas done through a review of 137 published articles about paediatric oncology related to caring science in Sweden.The result shows that the illness has affected, in both positive and negative ways, the wellbeing of everyone cominginto contact with the child. The cancer also causes distress related to all aspects of life including physical,psychological, existential and social. Mediating factors for the experience of distress and wellbeing are: disease andtreatment severity, age, gender and ethnicity of the participant, time since diagnosis, the use of internal and externalsupport, and the identity of the person reporting the data. Health promoting aspects frequently reported are: familytogetherness, coping strategies, engaging in normal life and activities, and quality of care which includes emotionalsupport, information and family participation in care. The hospital staff has to be aware of the psychosocial issuesexperienced by children with cancer and their families, and they have to acknowledge the value of formalinterventions, reporting benefits for children, families, and themselves.

  • 10.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Udo, Camilla
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Björk, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Ek, Kristina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E1-E11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language.

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients.

    METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used.

    RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

  • 11.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Striving to make a positive difference: school nurses’ experiences of promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls2014In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 358-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students' health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses were interviewed, both in groups and individually, to facilitate personal disclosure and expressions from their lived experiences. To achieve their goal of improving the health of adolescent girls, school nurses require flexibility in their approach and in endeavoring to make a positive difference they experience many challenges. This study concluded that school nurses can tactfully provide adolescent girls with knowledge and health guidance adjusted to individual needs and empowering the individual girl to participate in her own health process.

  • 12.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University of Växjö, Växjö, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University of Växjö, Växjö, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Altering the Parenting Role: Parents’ Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls2015In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 419-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In research the relationships between parents and their adolescent daughters have been viewed from problem oriented perspectives, usually exploring negative effects and health-related problems. Health and well-being are complex phenomena and knowledge is needed on how parents can support the health and well-being of their daughter.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to illuminate parents’ experiences of supporting the health and well-being of their adolescent girls.

    Methods

    A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach including interviews, individually or in group with ten mothers and five fathers was conducted.

    Results

    Supporting the health and well-being of adolescent girls was experienced as challenging. The parents needed to altering the parenting role: from being the one who had previously set the limits they needed to rethink and be available for support. In this process interplay, communication and trust were important to support the health and well-being of the girls in an efficient way. This meaning was further illuminated by four constituents: Balancing the need for control, maintaining a trusting relationship, interplay to facilitate their daughters’ transition to independence, and an ambiguous parenting role.

    Conclusions

    This study highlights the importance of parents being involved in the everyday life of their adolescent daughter to support her health and well-being. The parents’ ability to contribute to the health and well-being of their girl seemed in this study dependent on their ability to communicate and alter the parenting role with sensitivity to the lifeworld of the adolescent girl.

  • 13.
    Miri, Seyedeh Fatemeh
    et al.
    Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Javadi, Maryam
    Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on nutrition improvement and weight of overweight and obese adolescents: A randomized controlled trial2019In: Diabetes & Metabolic syndrome: clinical Research & Reviews, ISSN 1871-4021, E-ISSN 1878-0334, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 2190-2197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) program on weight reduction among Iranian adolescents who are overweight. Methods: Using a randomized controlled trial design, 55 adolescents who were overweight (mean [SD] age = 14.64 [1.69] years; zBMI = 2.18 [0.65]) were recruited in the CBT program and 55 in the treatment as usual (TAU; mean age = 14.88 [1.50]; zBMI = 2.09 [0.57]) group. All the participants completed several questionnaires (Child Dietary Self-Efficacy Scale; Weight Efficacy Lifestyle questionnaire; Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale; Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory; and self-reported physical activity and diet) and had their anthropometrics measured (height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and body fat). Results: The CBT group consumed significantly more fruits and juice, vegetables, and dairy in the 6-month follow-up as compared with the TAU group (p-values <0.001). The CBT group consumed significantly less sweet snacks, salty snacks, sweet drinks, sausages/processed meat, and oils in the six-month follow-up compared with the TAU group (p-values<0.001). Additionally, the waist circumference, BMI, waist-hip ratio, and fat mass were significantly decreased in the CBT group in the six-month follow-up compared with the TAU group (p-values<0.005). The CBT group significantly improved their psychosocial health, physical activity, and health-related quality of life (p-values<0.001). Conclusion: The CBT program showed its effectiveness in reducing weight among Iranian adolescents who were overweight. Healthcare providers may want to adopt this program to treat excess weight problems among adolescents. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-22 00:00
  • 14.
    Møller Christensen, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Patterns of support to adolescents related to disability, family situation, harassment, and economy2019In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 644-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Adolescents need support from family, friends, and teachers to increase their involvement in everyday life. Their environment and their own characteristics also influence their ability to participate in an everyday supportive environment.

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate patterns of support from parents, teachers, and very important persons such as peers to the ability of adolescents to participate in everyday life, as well as the importance of interpersonal relations as experienced by the adolescents.

    METHOD: The study has a cross-sectional design. The data compiled and analysed in this study are part of a longitudinal study of adolescents and their development into adults-LoRDIA (Longitudinal Research on Development In Adolescence). A combination of person- and variable-oriented design was used to capture patterns of support.

    RESULTS: Adolescents with a complicated home situation and low economic prerequisites who received little support from parents and friends participated to a lower degree in home activities. A substantial number of these adolescents had self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders and, as a group, were more often exposed to harassment. However, these adolescents participated to a higher extent in school activities, although they received little support from the teachers. The adolescents who received most support from parents and teachers were those with a country of origin other than Sweden and those who lived with both of their parents and had more siblings than average. However, this did not mean that they participated to a higher extent in home and school activities.

  • 15.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents - Swedish Translation and Psychometric Testing.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 42, p. E97-E102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) measures parental stress related to caring for a child with an illness. However, no Swedish translation is available.

    PURPOSE: This study reports a Swedish translation of the PIP and psychometric properties of the instrument.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a descriptive/methodological paper. The PIP was translated and culturally adapted to Swedish, and comprehensibility was tested. Data were collected twice from 48 parents of children with different illnesses, and initial psychometric properties of the instrument were examined. The IES-R (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) was used for concurrent validity.

    RESULTS: The Swedish version of the PIP demonstrated good correlations with the IES-R, and temporal changes were similar. Endorsement frequencies and test-retest were also satisfactory. When comparing groups of parents, the parents of children with cancer were statistically significantly more distressed, both on total score and for emotional distress and role function. Discriminative validity was demonstrated by comparing parents of children with cancer with parents of children with other diseases.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the PIP seems to be a valid and reliable instrument. However, as we used relatively small sample, for the future, we suggest further testing with larger samples.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians and researchers seeking to measure parental distress in chronic illness could use the Swedish version of the PIP.

  • 16.
    Ringnér, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Graneheim, Ulla H.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Person-centred information to parents in paediatric oncology (the PIFBO study): A study protocol of an ongoing RCT2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parents of children with cancer experience a demanding situation and often suffer from psychological problems such as stress. Trying to coping with the complex body of information about their child's disease is one factor that contributes to this stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate an intervention for person-centred information to parents of children with cancer that consists of four sessions with children's nurses trained in the intervention method.

    Methods/Design: This is a multi-centre RCT with two parallel arms and a 1:1 allocation ratio. The primary outcome is illness-related parental stress. Secondary outcomes are post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, depression, satisfaction with information, expected and received knowledge, and experiences with health care providers. A process evaluation is performed to describe experiences and contextual factors. Data are collected using web questionnaires or paper forms according to the parents' preference, audio recording of the intervention sessions, and qualitative interviews with parents and the intervention nurses.

    Discussion: Few studies have evaluated information interventions for parents of children with cancer using large multi-centre RCTs. This intervention is designed to be performed by regular staff children's nurses, which will facilitate implementation if the intervention proves to be effective. Trial registration: Clinical trials NCT02332226 (December 11, 2014).

  • 17.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    et al.
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Engström, Agneta Kullén
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: a questionnaire survey2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim was to investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to how the supervision was organized.

    Background

    The clinical environment plays an essential part in student nurses' learning. Even though different models for supervision have been previously set forth, it has been stressed that there is a need both of further empirical studies on the role of preceptorship in undergraduate nursing education and of studies comparing different models.

    Method

    A cross-sectional study with comparative design was carried out with a mixed method approach. Data were collected from student nurses in the final term of the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden by means of a questionnaire.

    Results

    In general the students had positive experiences of the clinical learning environment with respect to pedagogical atmosphere, leadership style of the ward manager, premises of nursing, supervisory relationship, and role of the nurse preceptor and nurse teacher. However, there were significant differences in their ratings of the supervisory relationship (p < 0.001) and the pedagogical atmosphere (p 0.025) depending on how the supervision was organized. Students who had the same preceptor all the time were more satisfied with the supervisory relationship than were those who had different preceptors each day. Students' comments on the supervision confirmed the significance of the preceptor and the supervisory relationship.

    Conclusion

    The organization of the supervision was of significance with regard to the pedagogical atmosphere and the students' relation to preceptors. Students with the same preceptor throughout were more positive concerning the supervisory relationship and the pedagogical atmosphere.

  • 18.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. University of Skövde.
    Living an everyday life through a child’s cancer trajectory: Families' lived experiences 7 years after diagnosis2013In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the lived experiences of families where a child had survived 7 years from a diagnosis of childhood cancer. This article describes one part of an inductive and longitudinal research project that included 17 families. Four families whose child was diagnosed with cancer 7 years previously were interviewed using a hermeneutical phenomenological approach. The families lived experience was described in one essential theme, "Living an everyday life through the child's cancer trajectory," further illuminated in 3 related themes: "Leaving the disease behind yet feeling its presence," "Being the same yet always different," and "Feeling stronger yet vulnerable." The results suggest that family members feel vulnerable even if a long period of time has passed since completion of treatment. To varied degrees they still may need support. When moving forward in life, the family members are helped if they can reconcile their memories and experiences derived from the childhood cancer trajectory.

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