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  • 1.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Fuzzy logic based decision-support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Knowledge intensive decision support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual NOFOMA Conference: Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research, Kolding, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring decision support in a Swedish context2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system are described, and the functionality is evaluated in a high cost environment exemplified through a Swedish context. Ten different reshoring scenarios, provided by Swedish reshoring experts, are entered into the decision-support system and the decision recommendations provided by the system are presented. The confidence that can be put on the recommendations is demonstrated by comparing them with those of the reshoring experts. The positive results obtained indicate that fuzzy logic is both feasible and that the quality of the results are sufficiently good for reshoring decision-making.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean implementation in geriatric care in a municipal: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S4-87-S4-99Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented at geriatric care in a municipal department in Sweden, focusing on the experiences and challenges of the employees, together with the strengths and weaknesses of the lean philosophy.

    Design/methodology/approach: The primary method used was a case study with interviews and observations on spot, in combination with a literature study. All with the intention of defining and describing lean, its value, and how organizations generally apply lean.

    Findings: All sources of information have shown that there are many advantages with lean such as better communication and a better-organized workplace. In addition, lean tools help to eliminate non-value adding activities (waste). However, implementations also bring about issues and challenges such as the difficulty of creating a long lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups and the decreasing demand for lean from the executives have been the main issues within the geriatric care. The next step might be to create a common organizational culture, which is permeated with continuous improvements, focusing on value-adding activities for the residents and others stakeholders.

    Originality/value: Very few studies have addressed lean implementation in geriatric care as well as in a municipal department.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Lean implementation in the geriatric care sector in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage (IJSSCA), ISSN 1479-2494, E-ISSN 1479-2753, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 56-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented in the geriatric care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The research focuses on implementation experiences and challenges encountered. The research method used is a case study using interviews and observations for data collection. The findings indicate that there are many advantages of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as better communication, organisation and workflow. The lean implementation worked as an eye-opener and created a situation, where the employees realised a great deal of waste in the daily operations. In addition, lean tools helped to reduce the waste. The findings also indicate that there are some challenges of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as the difficulty to create long-lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups, decreasing interest from senior management and lack of a holistic view were the main issues in the case organisation.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Business Unit Networks, Microwave and Access Supply, Ericsson, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Department of Industrial Management, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 904-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to elaborate, how the use of a joint-use strategy of Lean and Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, and agility. Telecom manufacturing has been under tremendous change after dot.com bubble burst in the early 2000, and new competition has originated from Asia. Being successful requires now more than before, and joint-use of strategies is one option to survive.

    Design/methodology/approach – A single case study from a Swedish company operating in the telecom manufacturing was conducted. In particular, a Six Sigma project was followed and analyzed during 2002. However, the outcome of the Six Sigma project has been studied in longitudinal manner until 2014.

    Findings – The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today's highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications – This study is limited to large company that usually has a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis as well as has level of control of the supply chain operations. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies and thus it may be more difficult to realize the Lean Six Sigma strategy in such environment. On the other hand, the processes in these companies are often less complex.

    Practical implications – This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes as well as how to perform a Six Sigma project in Lean environment, in a proper manner.

    Originality/value – This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy. The paper will also serve as a basis for other companies and industries, on how to survive in difficult times.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Ericsson AB, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S1-128-S1-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim is to examine if the joint-use strategy of Lean Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, cost-efficiency, and agility at the same time.

    Design/methodology/approach: A single case study including a Swedish company from the telecom manufacturing industry was conducted.

    Findings: A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications: This study is limited to large companies that usually have a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies.

    Practical implications: This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes.

    Originality/value: This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy.

  • 8.
    Asplund, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    E-procurement beyond the buyer cost perspective2010In: Proceedings of the 22nd NOFOMA Conference, Kolding, 2010, p. 483-498Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to provide and argue for a comprehensive view of eprocurement that involves both the buyer and suppliers and that goes beyond looking at mere cost reductions on the buyer side. More specifically, the paper describes benefits and barriers of implementing e-procurement solutions for both buyers and suppliers.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports on a literature review combined with a case study. The case is a public organization in Sweden, which prepares to implement an eprocurement solution. Interviews were also conducted with a selection of suppliers to the case organization.

    Findings – In e-procurement literature, drivers and barriers are often viewed only from the perspective of a buying organization. Benefits are mainly cost-related for the buying organization, while barriers often include suppliers. It is proposed that benefits and barriers should include both buyers and suppliers. The literature review and the case study findingsform the basis for further investigation into this problem area.

    Research limitations/implications – This study focuses on a public organization in Sweden. Yet, it could have implications for many public or private organizations considering implementing e-procurement systems.

    Practical implications – This research suggest that organizations to a greater extent should take the supplier´s side into account when implementing e-procurement solutions.

    Originality/Value – The study highlights a full cycle view on e-procurement taking both buyer and supplier into account.

  • 9. Baez, Y.P.
    et al.
    Andersson, R.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Can Lean Six Sigma philosophy help to improve collaboration to get more integrated supply chains?2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Proceedings of the 36th Encontro Nacional de Engenharia de Produção, João Pessoa, 3-6 October, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O desenvolvimento de produtos (DP) abrange muitas atividades que devem ser executadas por profissionais de diferentes áreas, cada uma vendo o produto de uma perspectiva diferente, mas de forma complementar (ROZENFELD et al., 2006). Há uma vvertente pouco explorada na literatura sobre esse tema que estuda os pontos de contato, ou seja, as atividades que requerem integração para serem realizadas. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste artigo é caracterizar a integração interfuncional em pontos de contato presentes no DP no setor agroindustrial. Foram entrevistados 10 funcionários de duas empresas multinacionais produtoras de sementes que participavam de diversas fases dos processos de DP, sendo que foi possível obter opiniões sobre as características das fases: inicial, intermediária e final. Através da interpretação dos resultados foi possível criar um modelo próprio para explicar as fases do DP, e quais funções atuam em cada uma das fases. Observou-se que dependendo da área que a pessoa trabalha, ela participa somente de determinadas fases, diminuindo seu conhecimento sobre as fases posteriores e vice versa. Não tendo visão multidimensional, que envolve integração interfuncional, as fases do DP e os objetivos das atividades de DP, podem ocorrer conflitos que prejudicam o desenvolvimento como um todo. Isso ocorre, porque muitas vezes dentro de cada fase tem uma equipe formada de diferentes funções integradas, que possuem uma alta integração, porém na passagem de fases, muda-se a equipe e há uma baixa integração, entre as funções da equipe anterior e a equipe subsequente.

  • 11.
    Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Universidade Federal de Viçosa.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Organizações Rurais & Agroindustriais, ISSN 1517-3879, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development (PD) includes many activities that must be performed by professionals from different areas, with a pluralist and complimentary perspective. The existing literature presents an important subject that is poorly explored: the points of contact, that is, activities that require cross-functional integration to be carried out. Thus, the purpose of this study is to characterize the cross-functional integration in the points of contact points of seed development processes, in the agricultural industry. We interviewed 10 employees representing different stages of the PD process, of two multinational seed companies. Based on this it was possible to obtain opinions on the characteristics of the stages: initial, intermediate and final. Through the interpretation of the results, it was possible to create a framework with the following dimensions: cross-functional integration, PD phases, and PD objectives. Depending on the area where the employee works, he/she participated only in a particular phase, decreasing his/her knowledge of the subsequent phases and vice versa. Thus, they do not have a multidimensional view of the PD process, which can be a source of conflicts in the PD process as a whole. There are also cases where, within a given phase, there is a high integration level between functions, however, when the process reaches the next phase, there is a low integration level between the functions of previous and subsequent stages.

  • 12.
    Björhag, Albin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Skärin, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Statliga incitaments påverkan på svenska företags reshoringbeslut2018In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Jönköping, 23-24 oktober, 2018, Plan , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13. Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    In-transit distribution as a strategy in a global distribution system2011In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 198-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution has become a key factor in today's logistics system due to companies' desires to achieve considerable economies of scale in production, achieved by focused factories, as well as customers' demands for shorter lead-times and customer adapted products. The purpose of this research is to investigate if the in-transit distribution strategy may offer companies a competitive advantage and may be used as a complement to the centralised distribution strategy and/or the decentralised distribution strategy. This study shows that the in-transit distribution strategy can give major competitive advantages by offering rather short lead-times for customers without having to store products locally in warehouses. This, in turn, gives lower warehousing costs, lower tied-up capital, a less interrupted manufacturing, and steady and continuous production volumes. In order to be successful with this strategy, it takes good planning, working closely with customers, good market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the strategy sufficiently. Among these factors, low variation in demand as well as manufacturing output is required, and furthermore distribution lead time needs to be predictable.

  • 14. Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Supply Chain Planning in Automotive Sector: A Swedish Case Study2011In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to enhance the current level of knowledge from supply chain planning (SCP) by analyzing the importance of collaboration, information exchange and a supporting information system in its successful execution. These are examined through a case study from international manufacturing company, which operates in automotive industry with its global manufacturing network. Research reveals that collaboration is a complex and important issue of SCP, and occurs simultaneously in vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is important to select strategic partners and to develop a structured work processes and routines. The main objective of collaboration is to determine common goals and objectives and to facilitate the exchange of information; these together drive the performance of a supply chain higher. A sufficient information system supporting the SCP is vital to facilitate collaboration, and information exchange between the different supply chain participants. However, currently in the case company quite many phases of SCP are completed without appropriate and integrated information systems and the process itself contains several manual phases.

  • 15. De Freita, M.R.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M.L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Demand management in the automotive industry: The role of cross-functional integration2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    de Freitas, Marlos Rocha
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil..
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil..
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Previsão de Demanda na Indústria Automobilística. [Demand Forecast in the Automobile Industry]: Papel da Integração Interfuncional. [The Role of Cross-Functional Integration]2017In: Revista ADM.MADE, E-ISSN 2237-5139, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on supply chain management indicates that cross-functional integration (CFI) may be a necessary practice to bring together demand and supply areas, and such an initiative can alleviate conflicts and improve the efficiency of the entire supply chain. However, there is little emphasis on the operational and technical aspects of CFI as a managerial practice and how this can influence demand processes. Thus, the aim of this paper is to analyze how the cross-functional integration contributes to carry out the demand forecasting process. In order to reach this aim, a case study was conducted in a Brazilian subsidiary of a multinational vehicle manufacturer. In total, sixteen in-depth interviews were conducted with managers of vehicle manufacturer and with its suppliers and resellers. As a result, it was identified that joint planning, willingness to work in team and group spirit were the most efficient tools to generate positive impacts in the organization and that factors such as cross-functional meetings and job rotation can present good results to increase the level of integration and improve the accuracy of the demand forecasting. Finally, this work suggests that crossfunctional integration could be used to improve market responsiveness and to obtain better accuracy in forecasting demand.

  • 17.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, D.
    Design-driven innovation: exploring enablers and barriersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation: a case study at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Industrial Design.
    Design-driven innovation: A literature review2016In: Proceedings of the 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Boston, USA, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Industrial Design.
    Design-driven innovation: Making meaning for whom?2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. S479-S491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design-driven innovation focuses on the innovation of product meanings. This innovation is enabled by integrating knowledge on needs, product language and technological development. So far, it has mostly been studied in contexts where the buyer is the assumed end user. There has been little research about design-driven innovation in other contexts, such as business-to-business and public contexts. Here, companies need to create value for multiple stakeholders. In this study, these are defined as users, buyers and influencers. The aim of this study is to explore how companies consider the different stakeholders in the innovation of product meanings. Two companies participated in a case study. The results demonstrate that both companies mainly focus on addressing needs. However, while one case company prioritizes the perspective from the user, the other focuses more on the buyer. The results illustrate the increased complexity that companies need to manage in design-driven innovation in these contexts.

  • 21.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Design-driven innovation: Making meaning for whom2017In: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference: Design for Next, European Academy of Design, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design-driven innovation focuses on the innovation of product meanings. This innovation is enabled by integrating knowledge on needs, product language and technological development. So far, it has mostly been studied in contexts where the buyer is the assumed end user. There has been little research about design-driven innovation in other contexts, such as business-to-business and public contexts. Here, companies need to create value for multiple stakeholders. In this study, these are defined as users, buyers and influencers. The aim of this study is to explore how companies consider the different stakeholders in the innovation of product meanings. Two companies participated in a case study. The results demonstrate that both companies mainly focus on addressing needs. However, while one case company prioritizes the perspective from the user, the other focuses more on the buyer. The results illustrate the increased complexity that companies need to manage in design-driven innovation in these contexts.

  • 22.
    De Oliveira, Eider Arantes
    et al.
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Characterizing Cross-Functional Teams in Service Companies: A Case Study from Telecom Industri2015In: Managing Intellectual Capital and Innovation for Sustainable and Inclusive Society: Proceedings of the MakeLearn and TIIM Joint International Conference / [ed] Valerij Dermol, ToKnowPress , 2015, p. 2139-2148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of cross-functional integration is based on the synchronization between different functions to meet organizational goals. One of the main elements identified in the literature within this theme is the cross-functional team (CFT), which is a group composed by members with different functional knowledge and experiences, from different parts of the organization, and under a leadership to accomplish a specific task. The objective of this paper is to characterize the internal dynamics of CFTs in different processes, such as: strategy development, product development, portfolio management, sales channels management, and business evaluation. Through a literature review, four basic dimensions were identified: Team’s Constitution; Task Drivers; Behaviors and Attitudes; Environmental Factors. A case study in a Brazilian service company was conducted in order to analyze these four dimensions in several teams. In-depth interviews, observation and documentary research were used for data collection. The results point out the necessity to invest time and attention in the constitution of the CFT, in order to select the appropriate functions it should be composed of, based on performance expectations. When the constitution of the team is characterized by a massive presence of senior members, positive impacts can be generated, such as: collaboration and team cohesion. This helps to reach team’s internal goals without frequent help from top management. This paper also presents implications related to the four studied dimensions, indicating ways to mitigate risks of failures and to avoid conflict within teams, and by that obtaining a superior performance.

  • 23.
    De Oliveira, Eider Arantes
    et al.
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Integration through cross-functional teams in a service company2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 405-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to characterize the internal dynamics of cross-functional teams (CFTs) in different organizational processes in a service company.

    Design/methodology/approach: A case study from a Brazilian service company was conducted. CFTs in five different organizational processes (strategy development, product development, portfolio management, sales channels management and business analysis) were analyzed through in-depth interviews, documents and non-participant observation.

    Findings: A framework with four pillars was constructed: constitution of the CFT, task drivers, behavior and attitudes of the team and personal motivators. It was possible to analyze the process of how a group acts and reacts under changing circumstances based on the pillars included in the framework.

    Research limitations/implications: The study is focused on creating analytical generalizability. Several insights in the 12 propositions presented in this study may be investigated in future research to validate the identified relationships among the pillars included in the framework. Moreover, the proposed framework allows the teams to be analyzed through a multidimensional view: structure, processes and impacts.

    Practical implications: If the semantic boundaries of the communication are not well delineated, the differences in understanding can generate manifest conflicts. Moreover, the workload in a CFT seems to be larger and more complex than working in a functional activity; however, members perceive that it reduces the risk of unemployment and increases motivation.

    Originality/value: The present study contributes to the extant literature with the proposal of a set of new exploratory propositions that can support future quantitative research about the use of CFTs in the service industry context.

  • 24.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Challenges with competitive manufacturing in high cost environment2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Engström, Gabriella
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Drivers and barriers of reshoring in the Swedish manufacturing industry2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 195-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore reshoring drivers and barriers in the Swedish manufacturing industry. The research is based on case research including five case companies from the Swedish manufacturing industry with experience of manufacturing reshoring. The empirical findings are compared to the existing literature to identify any potential gaps between the existing literature and the Swedish manufacturing context. The findings suggest that quality related issues, an increased degree of automation, and improved cost performance at the home base are the strongest reshoring drivers for Swedish manufacturing companies. The identified drivers and barriers are transferable and have the potential to be building blocks for researchers and practitioners to better understand the reshoring phenomena. The findings also show that further research should focus on reshoring drivers and barriers in relation to specific reshoring characteristics (e.g., ownership, scale of production being reshored, and position in the supply chain).

  • 26.
    Engström, Gabriella
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring drivers and barriers in the Swedish manufacturing industry2018In: Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, ISSN 2398-5364, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 174-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to explore reshoring drivers and barriers from a Swedish manufacturing perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This paper is a case study, including four Swedish manufacturing companies, with focus on drivers and barriers from the context of the Swedish manufacturing industry. A literature review of previously established drivers and barriers is used to map out the empirical findings and thereby identify potential gaps between the current body of literature and drivers and barriers from a Swedish manufacturing context.

    Findings

    The findings of the study suggest that quality issues continue to be one of the strongest reshoring drivers. Except for product quality, quality is also connected to host country’s infrastructure, communication and service. The supply chain perspective is a source of several drivers and is identified as a perspective often overlooked in offshoring decisions. Barriers related to firm specifics were more elaborately discussed by the companies, especially concerning calculation of location decision and the need to invest in resources, which allows for a higher level of capacity at the home country facility.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study develops a structured table of reshoring drivers and barriers which can serve as a base for future research. Future research on the calculation of location decisions is deemed as a crucial step to further understand reshoring and aid companies in the decision-making process.

    Practical implications

    The drivers and barriers identified in the study can give practitioners insight into reshoring from the perspective of the Swedish manufacturing industry and thus aid in future manufacturing location decisions. The table of drivers and barriers can also be important to understand how Sweden can strengthen its competitive advantage and motivate more companies to reshore manufacturing.

    Originality/value

    This is one of only few papers from the Nordic countries and also one of few case studies examining reshoring in manufacturing companies.

  • 27. Eriksson, D
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    The Importance of the Retailer for OEM Developing Innovative Products2011In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 63-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The supply chain strategy research has generated many frameworks for matching the supply chain with the nature of demand, market, consumers, or products. Recently many companies have implemented innovative new product development processes in order to increase revenue. However, research on the importance of the retailers for an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) adopting a leagile supply chain strategy for innovative products, is scarce. Using the case study method, this research investigates the need of collaboration between an OEM and its retailers. This research aims to richen the knowledge about demand supply chain management (DSCM), and the coordination of demand and supply processes between companies in the demand-supply chain. This research shows that there are several measures that may be used to monitor performance, and that collaboration is important for the case company.

  • 28. Eriksson, D.
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Tate, W.
    De Goey, Heleen
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Toward an understanding of value gaps in demand and supply chainsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    A consumer driven business models´ impact on sourcing and inventory2011In: Proceeding of the International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial management, Oulo, Finland, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased competition in many markets has forced firms to adopt new business models. Oneway to differentiate from the competition is to develop products based on implicit consumerneeds that may be sold at a premium price. This research uses case study methodology toinvestigate a Swedish furniture wholesaler, and how their shift to a consumer driven businessmodel has affected sourcing and inventory. The research reveals that the high focus on thedemand-side of the company has had detrimental effect on the supply-side. Between 2004 and2009 the number of stock keeping units increased dramatically, and the sales increased with22%. Sourcing was affected since the order quantities became smaller, which lead to longerlead times in manufacturing. The inventory levels also increased, as did the averageinventory turnover. As the market dropped in 2008 due to the economical situation, the casecompany was not able to respond to the changes in demand. The main theoretical implicationis that the management of the demand- and the supply-side of the firm have to be coordinatedon macro level, the main practical implication is that managers needs to devote time to bothmanagement directions, and the main social implication is that differentiated supply chainstrategies may employ people closer to the consumption market.

  • 30.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Foliated Networks to Analyze Moral Responsibility: A Conceptual Model2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 360-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    urpose

    This study aims to explore how the flow of moral responsibility in supply chains can be understood through an analysis of material, monetary and information flows.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Social responsibility, foliated networks and morality are used to present a conceptual framework that suggests responsibility links in supply chains.

    Findings

    By understanding the flows of material, money and information, it is possible to see how different types (liable and political) of responsibility can be identified. Conventional supply chain flows are thus connected with moral responsibility.

    Research limitations/implications

    Responsibility issues in supply chain management need to include supply chain links created by monetary and information flows, as well as material flows.

    Practical implications

    Supply chain actors need to consider responsibility across their entire supply chain, which includes material, monetary and information flows.

    Originality/value

    Foliated transportation networks, moral disengagement and different types of responsibility are combined in a novel way to facilitate a better understanding of responsibility in supply chains.

  • 31.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Guest editorial: Special issue on responsibility in supply chains2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 258-260Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, PerJönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Special issue: Responsibility in supply chains2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    The Role of Consumer Insight in New Product Development and Its Impact on Supply Chain Management: A Swedish Case Study2010In: Innovative Process Optimization Methods in Logistics: Emerging trends, concepts and technologies / [ed] Thorsten Blecker, Wolfgang Kersten, Christian Lüthje, Berlin, 2010, p. 113-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to explore how a profound consumer understanding may influence the early stages of a new product development (NPD) process. The issue is examined through a qualitative single case study combined with a literature review. The case study shows how the NPD process is structured and executed in a Swedish furniture company as well as the role consumer insight plays in that process. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in-depth interviews with persons representing senior and middle management in the case company. The research reveals that consumer oriented, cross-functional NPD in the case company has a strong impact on internal collaboration, and aligns the goals between different departments and functions within the company. Despite inefficiencies on departmental level, effectiveness on company level is achieved. Early indications show an expected growth in contribution margins by 8 percentage.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Ellram, L.M.
    Miami University in Oxford, Oh, USA.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    To offshore or reshore: The battle of data points2018In: Supply Chain Management Review, ISSN 1521-9747, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 42-46Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [...]our research shows that not all offshoring decisions are based on the best methods or information. [...]a series of incorrect decisions made offshoring look like a great decision when it was not. [...]after years of outsourcing, Plant A was still the same size and unable to trim its overhead despite lower production levels. [...]one product became so expensive to produce internally that it was priced too high and failed in the market while lower-cost competitors thrive today.

  • 35.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    School of Engineering, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Department of Industrial Management, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland.
    Creating value through wholesaler and retailer interface2013In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 113, no 8, p. 1169-1188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In the premium price range, retailer collaboration and showroom decoration as well as information dissemination play an important role in the consumer sector, particularly in furniture sales. The purpose of this research is to report findings from Swedish wholesaler and its process to improve sales of order driven furniture business.

    Design/methodology/approach – A large case study including 26 companies follows in longitudinal manner the retailers' contribution to value creation based on a value gaps model. Both qualitative and quantitative data are used. Approach was chosen as wholesaler needed to change its business strategy due to high competition.

    Findings – Innovative products may lose consumer perceived value, if information of the product is distorted by the retailers. It is of course so that the number of display pieces in retailer outlets play important role, but actually the way these are presented is most critical. Only one retailer in this study followed wholesaler's guidance, but again this retailer was able to show best sales. In turn, some retailers performed much lower than expected, as they were not interested from new sales concept implemented due to strategy change at wholesaler.

    Research limitations/implications – The service quality gaps model has been adjusted and is presented as a value gaps model that may be used to understand, how value creation is not limited to a single company in a supply chain. However, the authors would like to emphasize that the observations are not necessarily enough as only one wholesale company and its retailer network in Sweden was followed.

    Practical implications – The common practice for wholesalers to focus on display pieces is not sufficient. The retailers' ability to contribute to value creation needs to be considered, and this starts from collaboration at showroom level. This particularly concerns items in other than low cost product groups.

    Originality/value – The research introduces information distortion as a concept to understand, how consumer perceived value might be reduced by value gaps in a supply chain. Research is also unique in a way that it reports business strategy in other than low end segment (lowest costs), but still wholesaler procures products from Asia (China), and develops models in Sweden.

  • 36.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    School of Engineering, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola Research Unit, Kouvola, Finland.
    Linking Moral Disengagement to Supply Chain Practices2013In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 4, no 2/3, p. 207-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify if and how supply chain practices are linked to moral disengagement techniques and thus might cause moral decoupling (MD). The research uses a literature review and multiple case study approach to investigate this issue. The literature review links moral disengagement to supply chain practices, while the case study observes the existence of the practices, and in what supply chain configurations those practices might arise. Identified configurations that might cause MD are suppliers and external partners responsible for upstream activities, division of tasks, aggregation of materials, auction-like settings, long supply chains, production in low-cost countries, production where people are not considered as equals, and configurations made to reduce costs.

  • 37. Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Supply chain configuration and moral disengagement2013In: International Journal of procurement management, ISSN 1753-8432, E-ISSN 1753-8440, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 718-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research shows that supply chain configuration may facilitate or restrict opportunities of moral disengagement. It is proposed that a moral decoupling point is a point through which materials, information, and money may be transferred, while acting as a roadblock for moral responsibility. Decoupling points allow researchers to understand how moral responsibility is connected with supply chain configuration. By mapping and removing moral decoupling points managers can structure their supply chains to increase moral responsibility of employees and better fulfil ethical guidelines. Empirical material is two-fold in this study. Firstly we investigate media reports of four cases, where Swedish companies' moral is questioned. This is complemented with three real-life case studies from three global Swedish led textile companies.

  • 38.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Högskolan i Gävle, Industriell ekonomi.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Högskolan i Gävle, Industriell ekonomi.
    Exploring opportunities for moral disengagement in codes of conduct from the textile industry2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 371-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to assess how codes of conducts are outlined and formulated in relation to moral disengagement along the supply chain. The research is focused on the idea that supply chain structure may reduce the actors' sense of moral responsibility for the actions and impacts of the supply chain on workers and environment. The research has been conducted as a case study including Swedish firms in the textile industry. The research has used secondary data from codes of conducts. The findings show that codes of conduct do not cover all supply chain practices linked with moral disengagement. This does not cause immoral behaviour as such, but might cause moral disengagement. Supply chain research needs to focus on what should be included in codes of conduct and other ethical guidelines, so as to reduce the risk of immoral behaviour. In order to reduce the likelihood for moral disengagement, there are several supply chain practices that should be included in codes of conduct, such as power asymmetry, managerial support, and incentives.

  • 39.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Using the industry as a model for better learning experience in higher education2016In: International Journal of Management in Education (IJMIE), ISSN 1750-385X, E-ISSN 1750-3868, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 325-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to evaluate how industrial approaches to learning can be introduced into logistics/supply chain management (SCM) education programs in a university setting. This issue has been examined through two case studies. The first case study outlines the current state of a bachelor education program in logistics/SCM at the University of Borås in Sweden. The second case study illustrates two education programs for practitioners in an international electronics company from Sweden. The investigated university education program has several practical goals, but few practical learning situations. The industrial case study illustrates how practical learning situations can be incorporated into the education program and this may help to improve skills and confidence of the students. Practical learning situations seem positive, but need consideration to when they are to be included in the education program.

  • 40.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    An empirical investigation of enablers for reshoring2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41. Freitas, M.R.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M.L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Demand Management: The Role of Cross-Functional Integration in a Context of Political Turbulence2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Hedenstierna, Philip
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    An integrative approach to inventory control2009In: Rapid Modelling for Increasing Competitiveness : Tools and Mindset: Proceedings of the 1st Rapid Modeling Conference / [ed] Gerald Reiner, Springer, 2009, p. 105-118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inventory control systems consist of three types of methods: forecasting, safety stock sizing and order timing and sizing. These are all part of the interpretation of a planning environment to generate replenishment orders, and may consequently affect the performance of a system. It is therefore essential to integrate these aspects into a complete inventory control process, to be able to evaluate different methods for certain environments as well as for predicting the overall performance of a system. In this research a framework of an integrated inventory control process has been developed, covering all relations from planning environment to performance measures. Based on this framework a simulation model has been constructed; the objective is to show how integrated inventory control systems perform in comparison to theoretical predictions as well as to show the benefits of using an integrated inventory control process when evaluating the appropriateness of inventory control solutions. Results indicate that only simple applications (for instance without forecasts or seasonality) correspond to theoretical cost and service level calculations, while more complex models (forecasts and changing demand patterns) show the need for tight synchronization between forecasts and reordering methods. As the framework describes all relations that affect performance, it simplifies the construction of simulation models and makes them accurate. Another benefit of the framework is that it may be used to transfer simulation models to real-world applications, or vice versa, without loss of functionality.

  • 43.
    Hedenstierna, Philip
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Design of a framework for inventory control: Evaluation of forecasting and inventory control system2009In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on flexible control systems, Middlesbrough, UK, 2009, p. 573-580Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing inventories so that overall costs are kept low, while service levels are maintained is the central issue of inventory control, which only regulates two things: the size and the timing of orders. This is typically executed through a planning method, such as the reorder point system or, less frequently, the periodic order quantity system. These take into account a forecast, supposed to gauge the average future demand, and a predetermined safety stock, buffering against forecast errors and demand uncertainty. Pure demand also influences the system, as transactions affect the inventory level. It is crucial to understand how a complete system of demand, forecasts, safety stock calculations and planning methods work together to measure service level and overall cost of the system. This paper outlines a framework for the unambiguous representation of the relations between methods that interpret environmental parameters to plan orders. A number of simulations based on the framework are run to show, how the integration of the inventory control functions may affect the overall performance of the system. The usefulness of the framework lies in its ability to make a system duplicable (i.e. to transfer an inventory control system to a simulation model, or vice versa). Not only is this property important for creating simulation models that exactly depict the system being analysed, it also enables the study of a complete system for order planning, as opposed to optimising individual methods. Studying an inclusive system allow the same metrics to be used to evaluate changes to any method in the system. Another benefit of this approach is that the system’s metrics directly reflect changes in the environment. Simulations based on this framework are precise and substantially easier to evaluate than models not adhering to any standard.

  • 44. Hedenstierna, Philip
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Integrative purchasing and inventory control at wood retailer: Case study2011In: International Journal of procurement management, ISSN 1753-8432, E-ISSN 1753-8440, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 139-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purchasing order methods and inventory control are vital elements in fulfilling customer orders and building internal performance; this is particularly the case in retailing operations. In this manuscript, we develop different scenarios for various order methods for a wood retailer, where the performance of the different methods is evaluated through simulation, whereupon the fit between environments and methods is compared. Our results indicate that only simple environments follow analytical cost and service level calculations, while increasing complexity increases the synchronisation need between forecasts and reordering methods. In our research we also compare different ordering methods, and find that while the reorder point method is the most robust solution from the retailer's perspective, it could lead to distortion within entire wood supply chain.

  • 45.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Strategies for capacity dimensioning in manufacturing companies2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Dimensionering av kapacitet i 14 företag2017In: Bättre Produktivitet, ISSN 1402-1145, no 6, p. 16-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Kapacitetsdimensionering: 14 företags investeringsstrategier och planeringsstrategier2016In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Växjö, 19-20 oktober, 2016., Plan , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Metodstödet för kapacitetsdimensionering är i dagsläget svagt, trots att det är en viktig utmaning i de flesta typer av verksamheter. Hur en kapacitetsnivå ska fastställas kommer in i flera sammanhang såsom tillverka-/köpabeslut, maskin-investering, planering och styrning samt bemanning. Denna studie är utformad för att skapa en bättre förståelse för hur industriella verksamheter arbetar med kapacitetsdimensionering i dagsläget, samt vilka faktorer och utmaningar som påverkar och är centrala i beslutsprocessen. Det har visat sig att kapacitetsdimensioneringen har interna såväl som externa påverkansfaktorer och utmaningar. I denna studie identifieras budget, investeringskostnader, konkurrensförmåga, ledningsbeslut samt grad av komplexitet och integration i försörjningskedjan som centrala påverkansfaktorer. Vidare identifieras prognoser, kommunikation, suboptimering samt bristande systemsupport i beslutsfattandet som utmaningar i beslutsprocessen.

  • 48.
    Hedvall, Lisa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Introducing buffer management in a manufacturing planning and control framework2017In: Advances in Production Management Systems. The Path to Intelligent, Collaborative and Sustainable Manufacturing: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2017, Hamburg, Germany, September 3-7, 2017, Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Lödding, Hermann; Riedel, Ralph; Thoben, K.-D.; Von Cieminski, Gregor; Kiritsis, Dimitris, Springer-Verlag New York, 2017, Vol. 514, p. 366-373Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buffer management is not of a great concern when there is a perfect match between demand and supply. Demand represents the requirement for resources, and supply represents the collective capability of the resources to fulfill the requirements. A perfect match would then represent that supply can fulfill demand without any buffers involved, such as materials prepared in advance or capacity not being fully loaded. Such a perfect match is usually not possible to achieve since demand is frequently difficult to predict and the agility of the supply is limited. As a consequence, supply cannot perfectly match demand which may result in insufficient delivery performance. Different types of buffers may be employed to improve performance but they should only be used when the contribution of a buffer is greater than the cost of it. Hence, management of buffers is an important part of manufacturing planning and control (MPC) in order to mitigate such imbalances in pursuit of a competitive supply. The purpose here is therefore to define a framework for MPC that reflects the significance of buffers. To actually establish competitive supply is a complex challenge and four management perspectives are identified to support the balancing of supply with demand. Buffer management is here defined based on the intersection of these four management perspectives related to the transformation flow: the resources employed in the flow, the risk involved in the flow, the decision making related to the flow, and finally the planning and control to balance the flow.

  • 49.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Achieving the potential of seminar teaching: A student-led approach2014In: International Journal of Management in Education (IJMIE), ISSN 1750-385X, E-ISSN 1750-3868, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Demand-Supply Chain Management2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research aims to enhance the current understanding and knowledge of the demand-supply chain management (DSCM) concept by determining its elements, benefits, and requirements, as well as by analyzing key elements of the concept. Methodology: This research has utilized the case study strategy and the survey strategy, however, the case study strategy dominates. The case study research has involved five companies originating from Sweden and the collection of empirical data mainly from in-depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management. The survey research targeted the largest firms in Sweden and Finland and empirical data was collected through an online questionnaire. Findings: This research has established that the main elements of DSCM include market orientation, coordination of the demand and supply processes, viewing the demand and supply processes as being equally important, as well as value creation, differentiation, innovativeness, responsiveness, and cost-efficiency in the demand and supply processes. It has also been revealed that the main benefits of DSCM include enhanced competiveness, enhanced demand chain performance, as well as enhanced supply chain performance, while the main requirements of DSCM include organizational competences, company established principles, demand-supply chain collaboration, and information technology support. A key element of DSCM further investigated is differentiation focused supply chain design. It has been shown that these efforts can be organized into a process of five stages. In addition, it is important that this process is addressed in parallel with the new product development (NPD) process, that information is exchanged between them, and that they are directed on the basis of the same segmentation model. Another key element of DSCM further investigated is coordination between NPD and SCM. This research has identified several significant linkages between these management directions, which motivate the use of an integrative NPD process where the NPD functions are aligned with the main supply functions in the company and other sales-related functions supporting the commercialization. A final key element of DSCM further investigated is the significance of regarding the demand processes and the supply processes as being equally important. This research has revealed that logistics outsourcing can be risky, if it results in the supply processes being considered less important. Nevertheless, if senior management regards the outsourced processes as equally important as the in-house processes, the effect of logistics outsourcing on company strategies and direction in SCM could be reduced and logistics outsourcing could instead provide an opportunity to improve the design and differentiation of the supply chain. Research limitations/implications: This research has proposed, described, and further analyzed a demand-supply oriented management approach. Such a management approach stresses that the demand processes and the supply processes have to be coordinated and directed at an overlying level, in order to gain and sustain a competitive advantage in competitive and fragmented markets. This research is mainly explorative in nature, and more empirical data, from similar and other research settings, is needed to further validate the findings. Another limitation of the research is that it is essentially limited to Swedish companies (even if some Finnish companies are involved in the survey), however, many of the case companies have a large international presence and are among the top three in their industries, facts which provide some grounds for generalization. Practical implications: This research provides researchers and practitioners with insights into how to develop a demand-supply oriented business. It shows that companies should organize themselves around understanding how customer value is created and delivered, as well as how these processes and management directions can be coordinated. In order for this to occur, the demand and supply processes must be considered as being equally important and the firm needs to be managed jointly and in a coordinated manner by the demand- and supply-side of the company. It is also important that value creation is considered in both the demand and supply processes. Originality/value: Despite strong arguments from both researchers and practitioners for a demand-supply oriented management approach only a minority of companies appear to have effectively coordinated the demand and supply processes. This might be influenced by the lack of research examining how the demand and supply processes can be coordinated, what benefits can be gained by coordinating them, and what requirements are necessary to succeed. This research contributes by investigating these types of aspects further.

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