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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Fredriksson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Open or Delete: Decision-makers’ Attitudes Toward E-mail Marketing Messages2014In: Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, ISSN 2055-0286, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations make use of e-mail marketing messages, with Swedish companies spending SEK40 million on this form of marketing communication. The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of decision-makers in the Swedish manufacturing industry regarding e-mail marketing messages received.

     

    The authors used a quantitative research approach with an online-survey in order to collect the necessary data. The population was decision-makers within the manufacturing industry in Sweden and 1 777 responses from decision-makers were received and analysed.

     

    The majority of decision-makers tend to have negative attitudes toward e-mail marketing messages. Differences in attitudes exist between those of different ages and positions within companies. While respondents indicated that they check their e-mail frequently, no significant differences in attitudes to e-mail marketing messages could be identified. Marketers can attempt to improve attitudes among recipients by building relationships with the recipients prior to sending e-mail marketing messages, and paying attention to the layout and content of the e-mails.

  • 2.
    Arnaud, Alexandre
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Kollman, Alexandra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Generation Y: The Development and Use of Shopping Lists2015In: Advances in Social Sciences Research, ISSN 2055-0286, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grocery shopping is one of the most basic elements of consumer behaviour and is a part of everyday life. For consumers to achieve their goals and make their grocery shopping trip efficient, many plan their shopping trip, as seen in the development and use of a shopping list. Previous studies have taken a general view of consumers and not investigated any one specific cohort. Generation Y is regarded as an important and knowledge cohort, with greater access to information and resources yet the development and use of shopping lists among this cohort is largely unknown. The purpose of this study is thus to understand the development and usage of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers.

    Use was made of a qualitative method to understand the development, usage and outcomes associated with list usage among this cohort. In total, 29 personal semi-structured interviews were conducted with interviews in supermarkets, the university or at the participants’ house.

    The findings show that the majority of Generation Y consumers develop and use shopping lists, and use both paper and electronic lists. The purpose for their development is for reminding, planning and saving money. The respondents believe that lists help reduce unplanned purchases, as well as reducing the time spent and cost in store.

  • 3.
    Arnaud, Alexandre
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Kollman, Alexandra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    The use of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers in grocery shopping2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grocery shopping is one of the most an important part of daily life. According to a Market Brief by the Swedish Chambers, in 2009 Swedish consumers spent about 20% of their household budget on food and beverages (Swedish Chambers, 2011). Not only does grocery shopping require financial resources, it also takes time and effort. To assist consumers to achieve their goals and make their grocery shopping trip efficient, they plan their shopping trip prior to undertaking it. Part of planning may result in creating a shopping list that helps to direct the actual grocery purchase. Previous research has been conducted into the use of shopping lists in New Zealand (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Thomas & Garland, 1993) and the USA (Block & Morwitz, 1999; Spiggle, 1987) and Denmark (Schmidt, 2012) but despite the importance of planning and shopping lists there is

    Previous research has been conducted into the use of shopping lists in New Zealand (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Thomas & Garland, 1993) and the USA (Block & Morwitz, 1999; Spiggle, 1987) and Denmark (Schmidt, 2012) but despite the importance of planning and shopping lists there is little published research into their use. Their use among Generation Y consumers is also largely unknown and has not been researched. Generation Y’s members are driven by different values than the other generations (Noble, Haytko & Phillips, 2009). Generation Y is considered to be highly active in the marketplace as they are the current and future consumers (Noble et al. 2009). Generation Y frequently shops for groceries. A U.S. national survey of 1,251 Gen

    Generation Y’s members are driven by different values than the other generations (Noble, Haytko & Phillips, 2009). Generation Y is considered to be highly active in the marketplace as they are the current and future consumers (Noble et al. 2009). Generation Y frequently shops for groceries. A U.S. national survey of 1,251 Gen Y’ers showed that 6 percent makes daily grocery purchases, 25 percent goes twice a week to the grocery store and 40 percent goes at least weekly (Lachman & Brett, 2013). The weekly shopping trip for Generation Y is a mix of trips to farmers’ markets and specialty food stores where they buy their groceries at mass retailers, drug stores and, increasingly, online retailers (Orsini, 2012). Hoffman (2012) explains that Generation Y prefers to purchase cheaper food but at the same time Generation Y is also more willing to pay for fresh and healthy food. Shopping lists can serve a number of purposes. They can act as a script so as to make efficient use of the time in the store (Thomas & Garland, 1996; Iyer & Ahlawat, 1987). They can also serve as memory aids, specifically an external memory aid to remind the consumer to purchase items (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). A shopping list is also an indication of pre-shopping planning (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It has been suggested that consumers use a shopping list to control their expenditure and to make sure that they do not buy more items than planned, and in so doing, do not exceed their budget (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). For families, a shopping list can be a way for the family to function efficiently, making it a management tool (Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It also serves as a simplification strategy for grocery

    Shopping lists can serve a number of purposes. They can act as a script so as to make efficient use of the time in the store (Thomas & Garland, 1996; Iyer & Ahlawat, 1987). They can also serve as memory aids, specifically an external memory aid to remind the consumer to purchase items (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). A shopping list is also an indication of pre-shopping planning (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Thomas & Garland, 1996; Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It has been suggested that consumers use a shopping list to control their expenditure and to make sure that they do not buy more items than planned, and in so doing, do not exceed their budget (Thomas & Garland, 2004; Block & Morwitz, 1999). For families, a shopping list can be a way for the family to function efficiently, making it a management tool (Polegato & Zaichkowsky, 1994). It also serves as a simplification strategy for grocery purchasers, giving shopping activities an order (Arnould et al., 2000, cited in Thomas & Garland, 2004). Finally, a list can also assist consumers to stay within their shopping plans, and not be distracted by anything that could interfere, giving the list a goal achievement purpose (Inman, Winer & Ferraro, 2009). The purpose of this study is to understand and explain the reasons behind the usage of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers and the

    The purpose of this study is to understand and explain the reasons behind the usage of shopping lists by Generation Y consumers and the affect it has on Generation Y consumers in store. Use was made of a qualitative approach in this research which enabled the researchers to find insight information with regard to the shopping behaviours of Generation Y. In total, the authors conducted 29 personal semi-structured interviews with Generation Y consumers. The interviews were held at the supermarkets, university or at the participants’ house. The findings show that Generation Y consumers use shopping lists to remind, plan and save money. While Generation Y consumers are

    Use was made of a qualitative approach in this research which enabled the researchers to find insight information with regard to the shopping behaviours of Generation Y. In total, the authors conducted 29 personal semi-structured interviews with Generation Y consumers. The interviews were held at the supermarkets, university or at the participants’ house. The findings show that Generation Y consumers use shopping lists to remind, plan and save money. While Generation Y consumers are

    The findings show that Generation Y consumers use shopping lists to remind, plan and save money. While Generation Y consumers are technologically-savvy it enhances the ease of using shopping lists through mobile applications, yet the majority continue to use paper-based shopping lists. The shopping list enables Generation Y consumers to reduce unplanned purchase, time and cost in store. They use the list as a map to structure their shopping trip and therefore do not waste time going back and forth to the same section of the store; while some others use it only to pick up the items they need and not losing time thinking of what to purchase in the store. The outcome of shopping list usage is similar to shoppers who were the focus of previous studies, which leads the authors to conclude that Generation Y consumers are similar to any other shoppers. This research can affect the way in which retailers encourage Generation Y shoppers to formulate their lists (through brochures and mobile applications) as well as the way in which the lists are used in the store (through the use of in-store cues) to encourage Generation Y consumers to spend more time in store.

  • 4. Beckmann, Malin
    et al.
    Noll, Florentine
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Cause-Related Marketing (CM): The Perspective of Millennials (Abstract)2017In: Creating Marketing Magic and Innovative Future Marketing Trends: Proceedings of the 2016 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) Annual Conference / [ed] Maximilian Stieler, Springer, 2017, p. 999-1000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Applied Strategic Marketing2012In: Applied Strategic Marketing / [ed] Jooste, CJ., Strydom, JW., Berndt,AD., and du Plessis, PJ, Cape Town: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2012, 4th, p. 342-362Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Building customer relationships and loyalty2014In: Services marketing: A contemporary approach / [ed] Christo Boshoff, Cape Town: Juta Publishers, 2014, 2, p. 343-368Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Business-to-Business Marketing (B2B)2014In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management B2B marketing / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta Publishers, 2014, 3, p. 135-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Business-to-Business Marketing (B2B)2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management B2B marketing / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta , 2012, 2nd, p. 123-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Crowdfunding in the African context: A new way to fund ventures2016In: Entrepreneurship and SME Management Across Africa: Context, Challenges, Cases / [ed] Leona Achtenhagen, Ethel Brundin, Springer, 2016, , p. 220p. 31-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Data Collection2012In: Marketing Research / [ed] Adele Berndt and Danie Petzer, Cape Town: Pearson Education , 2012, p. 201-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Implementing CRM in an organisation2014In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta Publishers, 2014, 3, p. 195-2210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Implementing CRM in an organisation2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt and Madele Tait, Cape Town: Juta , 2012, 2nd, p. 175-187Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Introduction to Marketing Research2012In: Marketing Research / [ed] Adele Berndt & Danie Petzer, Cape Town: Heinemann , 2012, 1st, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Berndt, A and Tait, M, Cape Town: Juta , 2012, 2ndChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Spotify2016In: Contemporary cases in Southern African marketing / [ed] H.B. Klopper & Kim Viljoen, Pretoria: Van Schaik Publishers , 2016, 3, p. 89-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Stakeholders in relationship marketing2014In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt & Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta Publishers, 2014, 3, p. 153-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Stakeholders in relationship marketing2012In: Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management / [ed] Adele Berndt & Madele Tait, Cape Town, South Africa: Juta , 2012, 2nd, p. 139-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    The South African Police Service (SAPS)2016In: Contemporary cases in Southern African marketing / [ed] H.B. Klopper & Kim Viljoen, Pretoria: Van Schaik Publishers , 2016, 3, p. 47-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Your best Buddy: The case of Toyota South Africa2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Gikonyo, Lucy
    Strathmore University.
    Environmental Concern Behaviours in Africa: An Exploratory Study2012In: Journal of Management and Sustainability, ISSN 1925-4725, E-ISSN 1925-4733, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concern, including environmental behaviour continues to receive attention in both the public media and academic research. The purpose of the paper is to investigate environmental behaviour (both purchasing and non-purchasing behaviour) in an African context. Use was made of a quantitative study among a convenience sample of selected African residents. Statements reflecting non-purchasing indicated lower mean scores when compared to the purchasing behaviour statements. Statistically significant differences were found between the age groups with respect to both purchasing and non-purchasing behaviour as well as between the nationalities with regard to their purchasing behaviour. The findings have the potential of impacting the strategies of organisations operating on the continent. The major contribution of this paper is that is provides insight in the behavioural aspects as seen in an African context, and consequently provides detail on both purchasing and non-purchasing behaviour and the role of marketing aspects (such as price) in purchase behaviour.

  • 21.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Holmberg, Ulrika
    Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Jafari, Hamid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hartmann, Benjamin
    Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Ots, Mart
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Mobilapplikationer inom dagligvaruhandeln: Konsumtionens medialisering genom nya digitala tjänster2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är en sammanfattning av forskningsprojektet ”Medialiserad shopping”. Utgångspunkten har varit ett intresse för hur digital teknik i allmänhet, och smarta telefoner i synnerhet, påverkar shopping i butik. De senaste tjugo åren har vi upplevt hur e-handelssektorn genomgått en kontinuerlig expansion och hur en allt större del av våra inköp kommit att göras online. Samtidigt hade vi inför projektet en känsla av att kunskapen om matvarubutiker och deras relation till den nya digitala tekniken var otillräcklig – i synnerhet som användandet av smarta telefoner i praktiken innebär att konsumenter tar med sig sina egna datorer till butiken och på så sätt skapar en köpupplevelse som på samma gång är fysisk och digital. Hur påverkar detta oss konsumenter och vårt sätt att handla?

    För detaljhandelns del så ligger ännu så länge utvecklingen av shoppingappar, användande av platsbaserad teknik, individualisering och digitala tjänster i butik i sin linda. Vi har bara påbörjat utforskandet av hur shoppingupplevelsen i butik kan berikas och förädlas med hjälp av digital teknik.

    Inom ramen för detta projekt har vi under de gångna två åren utfört ett antal studier på en rad olika platser, och denna rapport sammanfattar och presenterar några av de viktigaste resultaten från vårt arbete. Vi är givetvis mycket tacksamma gentemot alla de som hjälpt oss längs vägen och vill passa på att tacka Handelsrådet (Andreas Hedlund, Lena Strålsjö och Jenny Dahlerus), deltagande företag, sponsorer och deltagare i referensgrupper.

  • 22.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Monash South Africa.
    Niemann-Struweg, Ilse
    Monash South Africa.
    Meintjes, Corne
    Monash South Africa.
    Resident co-creation: the case of the 2010 Soccer World Cup2013In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 336-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the involvement and actions (co-creation) of residents of South Africa prior to the commencement of the 2010 Soccer World Cup, which was held in South Africa during June and July 2010.

    Quantitative research was conducted in the three major metropolitan centres in South Africa, using a self-completion questionnaire among residents in South Africa, using purposive sampling. The questionnaire consisted of two sections. Data collection was supervised by trained fieldworkers.

    The responses of 1 352 respondents who took part indicate significant differences between the involvement of the genders, language groups and nationalities, while in the case of actions, significant differences were found between genders and income groups. The study also found an association between the involvement and actions in the case of this mega-event.

    The research was conducted one month prior to the event, and those who had exhibited actions may have been predisposed to taking part in the event. Research was limited to three major centres in South Africa.

    This has implications for the marketing of mega-events in other countries as well as events other than sports events, specifically in the development of the marketing strategy associated with the event and more specifically the marketing communication strategy, focussed on attracting residents.

    The importance of the study can be found in the scarcity of the literature that primarily investigates the role of residents in the co-creation associated with a mega-event.

  • 23.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Niemann´-Struweg, Ilse
    Meintjes, Corne
    Resident Involvement: The case of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Niemann-Struweg, Ilse
    Meintjes, Corne
    Resident Involvement: The case of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Koekemoer, Michel
    University of South Africa.
    Online Customer Complaints and Defamation2012In: Journal of Digital Marketing, ISSN 2229-595X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 21-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer dissatisfaction occurs when a customer believes that their expectations are not met by the organisation, resulting in a service failure. Some customers' response to this is to ignore it, others seek to communicate this to the organisation,while others engage in negative word-of-mouth (WOM) or revenge behaviour. These responses may also occur using digital media. When engaging in WOM or revenge behaviours, defamation may come about, either intentionally or through negligence. The purpose of the study was to examine a number of online complaints on a third-party website, made concerning a motor manufacturer to determine whether they amounted to defamation. Analysis of twenty-nine comments indicated that while the majority could not be regarded as defamatory, fivecontained elements of defamation. This is an area of law that must still develop in line with the demands of technology in the South African society

  • 26.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Mbassana, Marvin
    College of Business and Economics, University of Rwanda.
    Crowdfunding: The beliefs of Rwandan entrepreneurs2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Crowdfunding, through the use of Internet platforms, is a relatively recent development that has attracted both interest among entrepreneurs and investors. Recent figures suggest approximately $34.4 billion was raised in 2015, making crowdfunding attractive to entrepreneurs. Crowdfunding in Africa has not received the same level of attention, and thus the purpose of the research was to investigate the beliefs (awareness and knowledge) of Rwandan entrepreneurs towards crowdfunding. This study is important due to the lack of academic research into this phenomenon in Africa and in Rwanda. Understanding the beliefs (awareness and knowledge) of Rwandan entrepreneurs can indicate the potential for crowdfunding for entrepreneurs and their intention to use it as a future financing strategy. Due to the limited research conducted into crowdfunding, this study was exploratory in nature with the use of qualitative methods in order to attain the purpose of the study. Use was made of convenience sampling and in this pilot study, findings from personal interviews with 8 entrepreneurs are reported on. Financial constraints were identified by most of the entrepreneurs as impacting the development of their ventures. The findings show limited knowledge of crowdfunding as a phenomenon and the specific aspects of how it operates. Despite this lack of knowledge, the participants reflected an interest in using crowdfunding, though clarification of the expectations of the entrepreneurs and the investors would be necessary prior to its use. The use of crowdfunding can be considered by entrepreneurs but care would be needed to ensure successful implementation. The study concludes by suggesting implications for entrepreneurs, crowdfunding platforms as well as crowdinvestors who would invest in the various ventures.

  • 27.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Petzer, DanieNorthwest University.
    Marketing Research2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Petzer, Danie
    Gordon Institute of Business Science, Business school in Sandton, South Africa.
    Mostert, Pierre
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Pretoria Private, South Africa.
    Brand avoidance: An exploratory study in a services context2016In: Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Southern African Institute of Management Scientists, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Petzer, Danie
    Gordon Institute of Business Science, Business school in Sandton, South Africa.
    Mostert, Pierre
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Pretoria Private, South Africa.
    Brand Avoidance: The Potential Negative Role of Communication2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brands continue to be regarded as critical in the success of an organisation, serving as a key contributor to an organisation’s competitive advantage (McDonald, de Chernatony, & Harris, 2001). Research in branding has largely focused on the positive aspects, such as brand love, brand attachment (Japutra, Ekinci, & Simkin, 2014; Thomson, MacInnis, & Whan Park, 2005), with a dearth of research focusing on the negative aspects of branding such as brand hate, brand aversion and brand avoidance (Cherrier, 2009; Dalli, Gistri, & Romani, 2006; Lee, Conroy, & Motion, 2009a). Previous research on brand avoidance identified five types namely experiential avoidance, identity avoidance, moral avoidance, deficit-value avoidance and advertising (Knittel, Beurer, & Berndt, 2016; Lee, 2008; Lee et al., 2009a; Lee, Motion, & Conroy, 2009b) (see Figure 1). With previous research generally ignoring the role of advertising on negative brand aspects, this paper seeks to broaden our understanding by not only considering advertising but the role of communication as a type of brand avoidance.

  • 30.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Petzer, Daniel
    Environmental concern of South African cohorts: an exploratory study2011In: African Journal of Business Management, ISSN 1993-8233, E-ISSN 1993-8233, Vol. 5, no 19, p. 7899-7910Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental issues receive ever increasing attention in society and a general level of concern is expressed in society, yet specific action-related programmes (such as recycling campaigns) do not experience the success that could be expected, given the level of attention and concern. This poses questions regarding the awareness and actions towards environmental issues. These are however, influenced by attitudes, making them critical. The focus of this quantitative study was to investigate the attitudes (and their components) of South Africans towards environmental and recycling issues. The study was conducted among a convenience sample of 139 respondents using a self administered paper-based survey. The findings show that respondents exhibited relatively positive attitudes towards environmental issues. No significant differences were, however, found between groups based upon gender or income, while significant differences were found between older and younger respondents. This paper indicates that organisations involved in environmental issues (including recycling) can harness positive attitudes to increase the success of programmes that are introduced.

  • 31.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Petzer, Daniel
    North West University, South Africa.
    Wayland, Jane P.
    University of Arkansas, Little Rock.
    Comprehension of marketing research textbooks among South African students: An investigation2014In: South African Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1011-3487, E-ISSN 1753-5913, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 28-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reading is a skill people require in order to operate successfully in all spheres of life.  Mastering this skill is even more critical when pursuing academic studies. This study investigated the reading comprehension of final year undergraduate marketing students at a South African higher education institution (HEI) relating to their comprehension of marketing research textbooks. Two measurement instruments were used to test their reading comprehension. One instrument contained two passages from the respondents’ prescribed marketing research textbook and the other two passages from a comparative international textbook. Following the Cloze procedure, every 9th word was removed from the passages and respondents were subsequently required to complete the non-subject related words in one of the instruments fielded on a random basis. The results indicated that the majority of respondents exhibited a reading comprehension that is at the frustration reading level. A further evaluation that allowed for synonyms (Semantically Acceptable Scoring Method or SEMAC) to be included, did not impact meaningfully on the classification of respondents. Significant differences in reading comprehension could also not be uncovered based upon the respondents’ gender and home language. The results furthermore presented challenges for all those involved in higher education (HE), more specifically impacting on textbook choice as well as assessment and performance practices.

  • 32.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Saunders, Stephen
    Monash University.
    Petzer, Daniel J
    North West University.
    Readiness for banking technologies in developing countries2010In: Southern African Business Review, ISSN 1998-8125, E-ISSN 1998-8125, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 47-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Banks in developing countries are increasingly relying on innovative technologies such as cellphone banking, landline telephone banking, internet banking and automated teller machine (ATM) banking to penetrate existing markets and to create new markets. The banking industry in South Africa, as a developing economy, is regarded as sophisticated, but providing banking facilities to the ‘unbanked’ in South Africa remains a challenge. Consumers are not equally ready to adopt technology-based products, with technology readiness defi ned as “people’s propensity to embrace and use new technologies for accomplishing goals in home life and at work”. In the developing economy examined, a Technology Readiness Index (TRI) score of 2.53 for urban consumers was calculated. Such a TRI score is well below that of a developed economy such as the USA, whose score is 2.88. This could imply that consumers are not as ready to adopt technology, which needs to be taken into account by banks when doing product development and investing resources to increase customer satisfaction.

  • 33.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Tait, MadeleNelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
    Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Tait, MadeleNelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa.
    Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Wayland, Jane
    University of Arkansas, Little Rock.
    Evaluating the readability of marketing research textbooks: an international comparison2014In: Journal of International Business Education, ISSN 1649-4946, E-ISSN 2044-4575, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Locally authored textbooks are used at tertiary South African institutions to assist in marketing research studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the readability of locally authored marketing research textbooks in South Africa and compare them with international (USA) texts.

    Design/methodology/approach: South African marketing research textbooks (authored locally) used at South African institutions were identified. Electronic versions of the textbooks were used and analysed using accepted readability formulae. The same procedure was used with texts produced in the USA and the findings of each were compared.

    Findings: The South Africa texts scored higher on the Flesch Reading Ease score than US texts, which links to the target audience of these books (undergraduate students), while also being cognisant of the reading skills of the target audience but their score still describes them as “difficult”.

    Research limitations/implications: The original formulae and theory tend to be dated, though there are recent studies into readability in other areas of business studies. There are also those that question the applicability of readability formulae in the tertiary environment.

    Practical implications: Instructors need to ensure that material is at a suitable reading level to maximise the student’s learning. For publishers and authors, this means that the examples and illustrations used need to be linked to the context in which the student lives and functions, and not just focus on the English used in the text.

    Originality/value: While studies have been conducted into the readability of US textbooks, there is little published research into the readability of regional marketing research textbooks in other contexts to facilitate comparison.

  • 36.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Wayland, Jane
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.
    Evaluating the Readability of Marketing Research textbooks: An International Comparison2016In: Thriving in a new world economy: proceedings of the 2012 World Marketing Congress/ Cultural Perspectives in Marketing Conference / [ed] Kirk Plangger, Cham: Springer, 2016, p. 247-247Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Cestino, Joaquín
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    From Servitization To A Service Dominant Logic?: A Marketing Perspective On The Innovation Efforts In Newspapers2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Cestino, Joaquín
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Gordon Institute of Business Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Institutional limits to service dominant logic and servitisation in innovation efforts in newspapers2017In: Journal of Media Business Studies, ISSN 1652-2354, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 188-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the implementation of service-orientated strategies within newspapers using SDL and servitisation as theoretical departure points. This perspective helps to interpret the advancements and barriers in the current marketing innovation activities in the industry. Based on the exemplary case of the award-winning Svenska Dagbladet, we show that use is made of servitisation and SDL to the extent allowed by some strategic determinants of institutional nature. While some components of SDL have been implemented successfully others–customisation, resource development and coordination, and dialogue-based marketing communication–present managerial opportunities to increase value co-creation. But for this to happen the industry may need to consider changes in some of the institutional components of qualitative news that today act as institutional limits to innovation.

  • 39.
    Gikonyo, Lucy
    et al.
    Strathmore University.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Wadawi, Joseph
    Strathmore University.
    Critical success factors for franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market: customers' perspective2014In: International Journal of Management and Sustainability, ISSN 2306-0662, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 433-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to determine the critical success factors for franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market from the customers’ perspective. We used a quantitative methodology by taking a survey. The respondents were identified using convenience sampling. A sample of 389 franchised restaurant customers was drawn and a response rate of 98.7% was obtained. It is suggested that the critical success factors for franchised restaurants from customers’ perspective include good and consistent products and product range (menu mix), competent staff who were clean, warm, courteous and welcoming, a pleasant and clean atmosphere, reasonable and stable prices of products and a convenient location with efficient service. This paper has added value in theory by identifying the critical success factors for franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market from customers’ perspective. The findings can be used by restaurant franchises that seek to establish successful businesses in the Kenyan market and other similar regional markets.

  • 40.
    Gikonyo, Lucy
    et al.
    Strathmore University, Nairobi.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Wadawi, Joseph
    Strathmore University.
    Critical success factors for franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market: Franchisors’ perspective2015In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s globalized world, businesses look to expand to have a global presence. Restaurant businesses have expanded internationally using franchising. This study sought to determine the critical success factors (CSFs) of a franchised restaurant system entering the Kenyan market from the franchisors’ perspective. It sought to establish how franchisors define, identify, and evaluate success. This study provides a theoretical framework that helps to understand the background of why organizations seek to expand using franchising method and consequently the CSFs of franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market. The study used qualitative methodology with the use of in-depth interviews for collecting data. The results yielded CSFs from the franchisors’ perspective. As revealed by the study, the CSFs include brand power/concept, competitive environment, government policies, distance management, cultural appeal, excellent selection of franchisees, good site/location selection, good relationship with the franchisees, and proper contract management. These findings can be used by restaurant franchises that seek to establish successful businesses in the Kenyan market and other similar regional markets. The Africa franchise partners may also find some useful information from this article as they seek to set up the Franchise Association of Kenya. Other franchise businesses may also benefit from some aspects of the study.

  • 41.
    Helmefalk, Miralem
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, School of Business and Economics, Linneaus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Shedding light on the use of single and multisensory cues and their effect on consumer behaviours2018In: International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, ISSN 0959-0552, E-ISSN 1758-6690, Vol. 46, no 11-12, p. 1077-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Retail stores are required to provide a stimulating in-store experience for customers and do this by developing various strategies. One strategy implemented by retailers is the use of sensory cues to encourage consumers to engage with the environment and the products on display and available for purchase. Conducted in a lighting department, the purpose of this paper is to consider how retailers can employ a multisensory cue, which is formed by combining three single cues to positively impact consumer behaviours – specifically time spent, touching and purchase.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study comprised an experimental design, which implemented single congruent visual, auditory and olfactory cues that formed a multisensory cue. Consumer behaviour outcomes of these cues were measured using objective measures.

    Findings: The results show that a multisensory cue impacts time spent and purchasing, but no evidence of it affecting touching was noted. In the case of the single cues, auditory and scent cues impacted time spent, but their effect was not to the extent of the multisensory cue, which was superior.

    Research limitations/implications: The study focussed on one product category within a general furnishing store, thus limiting the extent to which the findings can be generalised.

    Practical implications: The effect of a multisensory cue exceeded that of single cues, emphasising the need for retailers to consider and develop a multisensory retail environment.

    Originality/value: While research into the effect of single cues on consumer behaviours has shown positive effects, research into a multisensory cue, especially in a real-retail setting, is relatively scarce.

  • 42.
    Holder, Magriet
    et al.
    Department of Business Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    The effect of changes in servicescape and service quality perceptions in a maternity unit2011In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 389-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose: The aim of the research was to determine the effect of changes in servicescape on the service quality perceptions of maternity ward patients in a private hospital.

    Design/methodology/approach: A quasi-experimental design was used. An experimental and control group (of patients) were surveyed before the changes in servicescape took place, and a further experimental and control group of patients were surveyed after changes in the servicescape. Each group was surveyed using a SERVPERF instrument to determine perceptions of service quality.

    Findings: The changes in servicescape which took place in the experimental context resulted in a significant change in service quality perceptions among the experimental group. This change was not seen in all service quality dimensions, however, with statistical significance only seen in the tangible, reliability and responsiveness dimensions.

    Research limitations/implications: Four different groups of respondents took part in the quasi-experiment (two experimental groups and two control groups) specifically in a medical setting, and the ability to generalise these findings needs to be investigated.

    Practical implications: Management needs to take greater notice of the effect of servicescape, as well as any changes in the servicescape on the perceptions of service quality.

    Originality/value: While there is agreement that the servicescape affects perceptions of service quality, this study shows the effect of servicescape changes on perceptions of service quality.

  • 43. Jeirud, Amanda
    et al.
    Helgeson, Victoria
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Feng, Songming
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    IKEA’s online content marketing - Attitudes and purchase intentions of generation Y2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is estimated that consumers are exposed to approximately 5000 advertising messages per day (Story, 2007), resulting in advertising clutter (Elliott & Speck, 1998). This advertising clutter results in organisations not being able to communicate easily with consumers. Pralahad and Ramaswamy (2004) describe the emergence of consumers who are more informed, empowered, connected as well as active in searching and using information. Consequently, consumers try to avoid advertising and instead seek valuable information for decision­-making.

    With the advancements in web technology and social media, increasing alternatives exist for consumers in their search for this valuable information. Valuable information is described by Jefferson and Tanton (2013) as relevant, useful, informative or entertaining. Research indicates consumers increasingly demand valuable information rather than traditional advertising (Larsson, 2013), and one way to access valuable information is through online content marketing.

    The use of content marketing has increased by companies (Lieb, 2011). Pulizzi (2014) defines content marketing as “the marketing and business process for creating and distributing valuable and compelling content to attract, acquire, and engage a clearly defined and understood target audience - with the objective of driving profitable customer action” (p5). While this is not the only definition, central to the various definitions are the concepts of creating and distributing valuable content in order to attract and acquire a defined target audience and drive customer action (Pulizzi, 2014; Content Marketing Institute, 2014; Jefferson & Tanton, 2013).

     

    Limited academic research has been undertaken on attitudes toward online content marketing. In this study, use was made of the attitude-toward-the-website construct to understand this phenomenon, thus focusing on the extent to which specific content marketing is entertaining, informative and its organisation. The segment that spends most time online and uses multiple types of media is Generation Y and the Boston Consulting Group (2014) argue that they represent the consumer market of the future, since this generation’s usage of e-commerce will grow along with the increase of their income (Smith, 2012). It is therefore of interest for companies to recognise what type of content marketing that appeals to this target audience in order to stay attractive.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate Generation Y’s attitudes toward IKEA Sweden’s online content marketing and to investigate any potential effect on purchase intention.

    In order to meet the research purpose, a quantitative method was applied. The survey investigated the respondent’s awareness of IKEA’s online platforms and attitudes towards IKEA’s online content marketing and their purchase intentions. Non-probability sampling was employed in order to reach the desired target group.

    High levels of awareness of IKEA’s online content marketing were identified. The main purposes for visiting IKEA’s online content marketing was to get inspired, collect price details and information. The overall attitude was positive, and most favourable to the structure of the online content marketing. The informative nature of online content marketing together with its entertaining nature and structure of the content all contribute to the positive attitudes among this group. These positive attitudes were reflected in stated purchase intention of the respondents, indicating that the online content marketing was able to drive consumer action (as suggested in the earlier definition).

    Women also had more positive attitudes towards the informative and entertainment nature of online content marketing. Consequently, it is suggested that IKEA focus on attracting women to this media due to the correlation with purchase intention.

  • 44.
    Jooste, Chris
    et al.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Strydom, JohanUniversity of South Africa.Berndt, AdeleJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.du Plessis, FlipUniversity of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Applied Strategic Marketing2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Knittel, Zana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Beurer, Karolin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brand avoidance among Generation Y consumers2016In: Qualitative Market Research, ISSN 1352-2752, E-ISSN 1758-7646, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this research is to explore the reasons for brand avoidance among Generation Y consumers. Researchers have traditionally focused on the positive relationship between consumers and brands, but, increasingly, consumers are consciously avoiding brands.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A qualitative study consisting of both focus groups and interviews was conducted among Generation Y participants.

    Findings

    The findings support previous research that identifies four types of brand avoidance, namely, experiential, identity, moral and deficit-value avoidance. However, the study also suggests that an additional type of brand avoidance, namely, advertising avoidance, also occurs. Aspects of advertising that can contribute to brand avoidance include the content of the advertising, the use of a celebrity endorser and the music in the advertising, as well as the response to the advertising. This study thus proposes an expanded framework of brand avoidance.

    Research limitations/implications

    This study has found support for the existing types and reasons impacting brand avoidance but suggests that advertising may also impact brand avoidance. This is an aspect that requires further research.

    Practical implications

    For marketing managers, the findings suggest that not only can product experiences result in brand avoidance, but that advertising may be a further reason for this phenomenon.

    Originality/value

    While there has been a great deal of attention on the positive aspects of brands, research on the negative aspects has largely been ignored. Further, the identification of advertising as a reason for brand avoidance is also suggested.

  • 46.
    Markowska, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Equity (Crowd)funding and wellbeing2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Ndikubwimana, Philippe
    et al.
    University of Rwanda.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Financial service and customer satisfaction in commercial banks in Rwanda (Bank of Kigali)2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Ndikubwimana, Philippe
    et al.
    University of Rwanda.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Service quality and customer satisfaction among bank clients in Rwanda2016In: British Journal of Economics, Management & Trade, ISSN 2278-098X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 1-11, article id 26149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite banking services in Rwanda have low levels of penetration, it is important for banks to focus on providing quality service to their customers. This is due to the effect it has on customer satisfaction and consequently on customer retention. The purpose of the research is to investigate the satisfaction of banking customers in Rwanda with regard to financial services received. This is done through investigation their perceptions of service quality and satisfaction. Little published research among these groups of consumers has been undertaken, making the findings important for the sector in Rwanda. Use was made of a quantitative study using a SERVPERF questionnaire adapted for the Rwandan context to collect data from 156 respondents. Statements on the dimensions of service quality and customer satisfaction were measured using a 7 point Likert scale. The results of study show that the bank’s physical environments and facilities are conducive to delivering good service, and the customers are satisfied with the Tangible aspects associated with the service and that they are prepared to reflect this satisfaction in their behaviour. It is recommended that the bank take note of these findings, specifically as they reflect some differences among different groups of customers and incorporate them into future marketing strategies.

  • 49.
    Nshimiyimana, Salomon
    et al.
    University of Rwanda.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Student Satisfaction: the Case of Rwandan Higher Learning Institutions2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Petzer, Danie
    et al.
    Gordon Institute of Business Science, Business school in Sandton, South Africa.
    Mostert, Pierre
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Pretoria Private, South Africa.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Petrou, S.
    A quantitative exploration of service brand avoidance and its antecedents among CNO customers – an emerging market perspective2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Branding research focuses primarily on products and not services, leading to limited insights into service brand avoidance. Understanding service brand avoidance and its possible antecedents will provide marketers with insights into service brand avoidance behaviour of customers in an emerging market and was therefore identified as purpose of this study. Data were collected from 327 South African cell phone customers and subjected to an exploratory factor analysis and multiple regression analysis. Identity avoidance and experiential avoidance were found to be the strongest predictors of service brand avoidance. Advertising avoidance, in contrast, did not predict service brand avoidance. This research contributes by quantitatively exploring service brand avoidance and its antecedents, as identified by previous qualitative research.

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