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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Lunds universitet.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Chalmers.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Svenska handelshögskolan i Helsingfors.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Rehn, Alf
    Åbo Akademi.
    Segerstedt, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Öhman, Peter
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Industriell ekonomi och organisering2016Book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sannö, A.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Sustainable production in surface treatment SMEs: an explorative study of challenges and enablers from the CEOs perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sannö, Anna
    Mälardalen University,School of Innovation, IDT-Design and Engineering.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Mälardalen University,School of Innovation, IDT-Design and Engineering, .
    Sustainable production adoption by surface treatment SMEs: Challenges and enablers2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption to sustainable production is a continuous but necessary strive for manufacturing operations, including small and medium enterprises, SMEs. Meeting the future needs of the economic, social and environmental dimensions provides challenges for SMEs. In order for these challenges to be met understanding of internal and external enablers is required. Studies focusing on the enablers for sustainability amongst SMEs are rare; hence these companies are important players in the supply chain to focal companies. In order to enhance the understanding of the adoption of sustainable production for the sector surface treatment SMEs, an explorative study has been conducted. In this study, the focus has been placed in the identification and analysis of the challenges and enablers for adoption of sustainable production. Two stages of empirical data collection were undertaken: a focus group session and an online questionnaire. The findings present challenges based on the limitations of the surface treatment process but also where enablers for the social, economic and environmental for meeting those challenges are strongly linked. The results showed that these SMEs face challenges in their way towards sustainable production, mainly due to: low economic profitability, need for improvement in old working procedures, lack of fully understanding regarding environmental legislation, difficulty in ensuring workforce, lack of technology development and resistance towards change. These challenges could be faced through internal and external enablers, where the support of large-size customers and other stakeholders is critical for these SMEs.

  • 4.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansson, G.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Lund, 221 00, Sweden.
    Barriers and Enablers for the Adoption of Sustainable Manufacturing by Manufacturing SMEs2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have inherent characteristics, which require specific solutions for improving the sustainability performance of their operations. The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge on barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs and to provide insights into what enablers can be used to overcome existing barriers. Taking, as a starting point, a systematic literature review, this paper presents a categorization of barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs. In total, seven categories for classifying the barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing within SMEs were identified: organizational, managerial and attitudinal; informational; governmental; financial; training and skills development; market and business context; and technological. Additionally, this study elaborates on what barriers could be mitigated through the enablers. This study found specific enablers with the potential to mitigate a significantly higher number of barriers and referred to them as ‘critical enablers’. SMEs aiming to adopt sustainable manufacturing practices or improve their sustainability performance are encouraged to focus on the enablers in these categories. This paper synthesizes and facilitates interpretation of the existing body of evidence on barriers and enablers for adopting sustainable manufacturing in SMEs.

  • 5.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Conceptual sustainable production principles in practice: Do they reflect what companies do?2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 141, p. 693-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common understanding of sustainable production principles and the identification of sustainable manufacturing practices among practitioners are key starting points in studying how manufacturers are making their operations more sustainable. However, there is a lack of insight in the literature connecting conceptual sustainable production principles, and the practices reflecting these principles. Using semi-structured interviews founded on the sustainable production principles posed by the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, this paper presents an outlook of how companies in different industries carry out manufacturing practices related to the sustainability production principles. Results showed that the majority of sustainable manufacturing practices remain strongly centered on the environmental dimension of sustainability, with the greatest number of practices emanating from principles concerning energy and material conservation, and waste management. Similarly, reactive sustainable manufacturing practices prevailed over proactive sustainable manufacturing practices, as most of the practices aimed to comply with regulatory and market pressures. Quality and environmental management systems were acknowledged as important tools for putting sustainable production principles into practice; while Swedish environmental and social regulations were found to drive sustainable manufacturing practices. This study connects sustainable production principles with sustainable manufacturing practices and opens the way for further studies on a global or sector-specific scale.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 6.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Implementation of sustainable production principles within Swedish manufacturers2014In: Proceedings of The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014, Göteborg: Chalmers university , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Both, a common understanding on sustainable production principles and the identification of sustainable production practices within manufacturers constitute key starting points when the aim is to study how Swedish manufacturers are working towards sustainable production. Using an interview guide based on the sustainable production principles by the Lowell Center of Sustainable Production (LCSP), this paper provides an overview of how Swedish manufacturers comply with these set of principles.

  • 7.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sustainability in manufacturing: A literature review2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased sustainability awareness among consumers and other stakeholders has created a challenging environment for manufacturers. In order to remain in current markets it is expected from manufacturer's operations to be conscious about their impact on sustainability issues. The paper reports on a systematic review which examines sustainability practices in manufacturing companies. The systematic review aims to identify empirical-based papers to pinpoint sustainability issues addressed within manufacturing industry. To do so, trending topic categories were identified for each sustainability dimension (environment, people and profit). This paper provides further direction for future research.

  • 8.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mdh.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Production Development: Design and Operation of Production Systems2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9. Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Production System Design and Evaluation for Increased System Robustness2004In: Proceedings of Second World Conference on POM and 15th Annual POM Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10. Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Produktionsutveckling2006In: Ledning i småföretag / [ed] Håkan Ylinenpää, Bo Johansson, Jan Johansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 161-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Produktionsutveckling: utveckling och drift av produktionssystem2005Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Berg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Fjällström, Sabina
    Stahre, Johan
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Production ramp-up in the manufacturing industry: Findings from a case study2005In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Reconfigurable Manufacturing, Ann Arbor, MI, US., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a case study investigating critical factors affecting production ramp-up. The study was performed in an assembly line of a medium-size Swedish manufacturing company. The context and performance during ramp-up was analyzed. Empirical findings indicate that ramp-up performance depends to a large extent on how earlier phases of the product realization process have been carried out. Specifically, supplier choice, relationships with suppliers, involvement of personal, verification of the match between product and process, resource allocation for critical processes, as well as training of assembly personnel seem to have major impact on performance during production ramp-up.

  • 13.
    Berg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    A performance measurement framework for evaluation of production ramp-up2005In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management 2005, Nusa Dua, Bali., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe how performance measurement of production ramp-up has been dealt with so far, and to suggest improvements in the measurement procedure. A performance measurement framework supporting production ramp-up evaluation is proposed. Based on the results from both theoretical and empirical studies it can be concluded that ramp-up complexity, ramp-up preparations and activities performed during ramp-up highly influences the production ramp-up performance. When evaluating production ramp-up by comparing actual versus planned performance no information regarding how the objectives were met is given. This also means that no information on what to improve in the ramp-up process is achieved. To enable this information from a performance evaluation of a ramp-up it is therefore essential that ramp-up complexity, ramp-up preparations and activities performed during ramp-up considered. This in turn also means that it is important to identify measures for these areas.

  • 14.
    Berg, Magnus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Managing production ramp-up: Requirement on strategy content2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To compete as a manufacturer in today’s environment, with severe competition an rapidly decreasing product life cycles, the ability to manage production ramp-up successfully has become a vital issue. It’s evident when reviewing previous research that knowledge and skills about how to manage a production ramp-up often is lacking. Consequently this means a lack of comprehensiveness which often results in inferior ramp-up management. The intention when managing a production ramp-up strategy is to facilitate decisions that lead to best possible usage of time, financial means and resources when trying to meet preset ramp-up performance targets. In order to accomplish this some sort of production ramp-up management framework needs to be in place. In this paper a proposal for a production ramp-up management framework is suggested. This framework is meant to be a support when deciding upon a new, existing or a combination of production ramp-up strategies to carry out a production ramp-up. The framework suggests that the changes needed in the manufacturing strategy content, critical factors affecting the production ramp-up and previous production ramp-up evaluation should guide when choosing production ramp-up strategy.

  • 15.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping university.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    New ways of organizing product introductions2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no supplement 1, p. 4856-4861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe and reflect on an interactive research approach used to address the challenges on how to improve product introductions, the part of the product realization process associated with the transfer of a product from product development to serial production. In the interactive research approach, research results as well as improvement of practice are given equal importance. The collaboration between researchers and practitioners therefore addresses both the focus and the process of the change. The approach includes four main iterative steps: 1) mapping/diagnosis, 2) feedback of results, 3) participation in development activities, and 4) follow-up/evaluation. The paper reports findings from interactive research in one company within office product industry and one company group, consisting of three company units within the engine industry. Preliminary findings indicate that the participating companies afterwards work in a more structured way with product introductions and that the employees have gained deeper knowledge about product introductions as well as experienced the advantages of working across functional boundaries. Furthermore, the interactive research approach is suitable to run projects from an ergonomics perspective as it focuses on developing both practice and theory, it is human-centered, and it emphasizes broad participation from practitioners.

  • 16.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    HELIX Competence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division Materials and Production, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Interactive research in production start-up—application and outcomes2020In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1561-1581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on interactive research as a means to create relevant knowledge in the domain of operations management in general and specifically in the context of production start-up.

    Design/methodology/approach: The reflection on the use of interactive research in production start-ups was based on a study of two completed interactive research projects. The lens for reflection was a framework including context, quality of relationship, quality of the research process itself and outcomes.

    Findings: The context was industrial manufacturing companies in Sweden, with different kind of challenges related to production start-ups, such as collaboration between involved functions and suppliers, competence development and work routines. Indicators of the quality of relationship between researchers and practitioners were initiated development activities and new collaboration between functions, within the company, between companies and in supply chains. The reflection of the quality of the research process itself was based on an interactive research process including four iterative steps with regular follow-ups allowing joint practitioner and researcher reflection on the progress. Identified outcomes included increased awareness and competence on how to deal with production start-ups, improvements of communication, work procedures and structures, better use of competences, increased cross-functional dialogue and cultural understanding.

    Practical implications: Implications for practitioners are the possibilities for knowledge creation through interactive collaboration in research projects enabling exchange between researchers from complementary fields and other companies dealing with production start-ups.

    Originality/value: The interactive research approach enables joint knowledge creation in a fast-changing context such as production start-ups as well as value-adding results both for practitioners in industry and for academia.

  • 17. Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Knowledge gained from product introduction and implications for organizational learning2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Broman, Martin
    et al.
    IVF Industriforskning AB.
    Eskilander, Stefan
    IVF Industriforskning AB.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Interaction between Assembly System Suppliers and their Customers2000In: The 33RD CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems: the manufacturing systems in its human context : a tool to extend the global welfare : 5-7 June, 2000, Stockholm, Sweden : proceedings., Stockholm, Sweden, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Review of Supply Chain Collaboration Levels and Types2005In: Proceedings : International conference on operations and supply chain management: Bali-Indonesia, 15-17 December 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Rigor, relevance, funding and qualifications: The catch 22 of University – industry interaction research2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Supply Chain Interaction: Market Requirements Affecting the Level of Interaction2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the mobile manufacturing concept is to provide solutions for mobile and flexible manufacturing capacity on demand. The idea with the concept is that a mobile manufacturing unit (MMU) could sent to the place where it is needed, either within the company, to a local supplier, to a customer, or to a partner, in order to, for example, cover a temporary volume peak.

    Within the research project Factory-in-a-Box, five fully operative MMUs have been designed and realized in close contact with Swedish manufacturing industries. The main logistic focus within the research project has been put on optimizing the transport solutions, while the implications on the relations in the supply chain have still not been analyzed. It is however, important to clarify that the geographical and organizational distance between the stationary site and the site where the MMU temporarily is located, affects the complexity of the information and material flow. In order to secure MMU productivity, both information and material flow to and from the stationary factory, the stationary factory’s sub-suppliers, the local suppliers, and the customer, must be handled.

    In order to use the MMU’s resources efficiently, the level of interaction with all these actors has to be selected wisely. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the information flow and material flow in one of the demonstrators within the Factory-in-a-Box project, in order to highlight the importance of selecting appropriate level of interaction and how mobility affects the supply chain relations.

  • 22.
    Edh, Nina
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Operations Management.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Operations Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Organizational comprehension of manufacturing strategy - A case study of a SMME2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Edh, Nina
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Production-related Staff's Perception of Manufacturing at a SMME2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's global competitiveness urges SMMEs to pay attention to their MS process. The purpose of this case study at a Swedish SMME, mainly conducted through interviews with production-related staff: staff with direct connection to everyday production work, is to explore their perception of the MS content. The study shows that communication is the main obstacle for production-related staff's perception of the MS. Their perception is diverse and based on a multitude of factors, such as employment period, organizational belonging, and the employee's own interest. Several problem areas are identified and need to be investigated further.

  • 24.
    Fjällström, Sabina
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Berg, Magnus
    Production ramp-up and the role of information2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Fjällström, Sabina
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Stahre, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Information enabling production ramp-up2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 178-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to identify information enabling and supporting production ramp-up processes, by exploring critical events and the role of information in such events.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research approach was based on empirical and theoretical investigations. A selection of 30 events, considered the most critical for production ramp-up realization and/or performance at one Swedish automotive company, were categorized and constituted the base for the analysis which focused information types and sources enabling event handling.

    Findings – Information enabling event handling is a balanced combination of problem and domain information, regardless of event category. However, a differentiation concerning preference and usage of information types between experienced and less experienced personnel is identified. Problem-solving information has the character of pragmatic information, composed of complementary parts of confirmation and novelty in terms of domain and problem information. The preferred information source in all event categories was “other people”.

    Research limitations/implications – The study focuses on the application of information in relation to critical events during production ramp-up. General information theory is not addressed in depth.

    Practical implications – Information type and information source are not dependent on certain event categories, which allows a general information strategy enabling production ramp-up. To facilitate production ramp-up and event handling managers and key personnel need to apply a holistic perspective and need to be updated on domain information of the products, the equipment, and the production process during production ramp-up.

    Originality/value – The originality is in the focus and role of information to achieve an efficient production ramp-up performance. A supporting model is developed which describes the structure of pragmatic information for personnel with various levels of experience, regardless of event category.

  • 26.
    Fjällström, Sabina
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Stahre, Johan
    Differences concerning information when handling predictable and enpredictable events in production systems2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27. Groth, M
    et al.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Research in Sweden on product and production development: A survey2006In: Technology and global integration: proceedings of the Second European Conference on Management of Technology, Birmingham, 10th to 12th September 2006 / [ed] David Bennett, Ben Clegg, Andrew Greasley, Pavel Albores, 2006, p. 288-295Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, and HELIX Competence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    The Learning Potential of Boundary Crossing in the Context of Product Introduction2017In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 235-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to explore challenges related to the integration between product development and production in product introduction and, given these challenges, to analyse the learning potential of boundary crossing in the context of product introduction. The paper draws on evidence from a Swedish manufacturing company. The theoretical framework is based on a boundary-crossing perspective, which in turn is framed by a workplace learning perspective. Data were collected through interviews with 19 employees from the product development department and 21 employees from the production plant, and 8 focus-group interviews. Within the company, there were many challenges related to product introduction, but the findings also show these challenges can provide learning opportunities by enabling the boundaries to be crossed between the product development department and the production plant. Several forms of intrapersonal or interpersonal boundary crossing were identified. Individuals acted as brokers, and prototypes, pre-series, DfA analysis and a crossfunctional team served as boundary objects and encounters. Nothing in our study indicates that the boundary crossing identified on the intrapersonal and interpersonal levels created learning potentials on the organisational level in the company. The conclusion is that it is necessary to consider the learning potential made available by boundary crossing in order to support learning, and thereby improve the integration between product development and production in product introduction. By seeing and using prototypes and pre-series production as learning opportunities you can create a better preparedness and provide collective access to knowledge required for successful product introduction.

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  • 29.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Challenges with industralization in a supply chain network: A supplier perspective2015In: Proceedings of the MakeLearn and TIIM Joint International Conference, Bari, Italy, 27–29 May 2015., 2015, p. 309-318Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the challenges with industrialization across a supply chain network, from a supplier perspective. The study focuses on identifying the challenges encountered by the supplier, when working with industrialization alongside the customer’s industrialization process, the reasons for and the effects of these challenges, as well as how these challenges can be managed. These issues have been examined through a single case study including a Swedish company from the polymer systems and components industry. Empirical data has been collected through in-depth and semi-structured interviews. This study has identified fourteen challenges as well as their main reasons and effects. In addition, solutions to the challenges have been identified. The challenges can be classified as internal or external. An internal challenge originates from inside the supplier’s own organization, while an external challenge originates from the customer’s organization or from the collaboration between the two organizations. This study is explorative in nature and is limited to one supplier located in Sweden. Thus, empirical data from similar and other research settings should be gathered to reinforce the validity of the findings.  

     Keywords: Industrialization; Production ramp-up; Supply chain; Supplier

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  • 30.
    Hussmo, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Aspects affecting boundary objects in product realization: A systematic literature reviewManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hussmo, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Aspects affecting boundary objects in product realization: A systematic literature review2023In: Leveraging transdisciplinary engineering in a changing and connected world: Proceedings of the 30th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, Hua Hin Cha Am, Thailand, July 11–14, 2023 / [ed] P. Koomsap, A. Cooper & J. Stjepandić, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2023, p. 72-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product realization is inherently transdisciplinary, resulting in the need for different functions to collaborate. However, collaboration can be hindered by boundaries, arising from differences and dependencies in knowledge. One way to integrate knowledge across these boundaries is through the use of so-called boundary objects. However, boundary objects are situational, meaning that different aspects can affect whether an object functions as a boundary object or not. Based on a systematic literature review, this paper presents a comprehensive overview of different aspects that need to be considered for an object to function as a boundary object in the context of product realization. The aspects were divided into properties relating to the object, and situational aspects connecting to the situation in which the object is used. The paper further shows the role that interplay between aspects plays, and how it can be accounted for.

  • 32.
    Hussmo, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Boundary objects in product realization: The role of properties, situation, and interplayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Hussmo, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Engineering Tools as Boundary Objects Between Product Development and Production2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering: Proceedings of the 29th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2022) / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap & J. Stjepandić, IOS Press, 2022, p. 687-696Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product realization, i.e., product development and production, involves several transdisciplinary activities. People from different disciplines are involved, representing different practices and knowledge areas. These differences create boundaries, which must be crossed to succeed with the endeavor of product realization. One way of crossing boundaries is through boundary objects, i.e., artefacts that create common understanding between different domains. Boundary objects have been applied in for example educational research and are a promising approach in engineering. Between product development and production, engineering tools such as prototypes, simulation, and design for assembly are often used as boundary objects. Previous research has shown that different aspects affect whether an artefact function as a boundary object or not. However, the context of product realization remains unexplored in this topic. This paper, therefore, explores what aspects affect how an engineering tool can function as a boundary object. Based on a literature review, workshops and a case study, the paper presents aspects related to the situation, the tool and the individuals that affect it an engineering tool function as boundary objects. The paper addresses two important transdisciplinary concerns: knowledge from different disciplines is combined, and both academic and scientific goals are considered.

  • 34.
    Hussmo, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Knowledge Integration in Industrialized House Building – Current Practice and Challenges2022In: Towards Sustainable Customization: Bridging Smart Products and Manufacturing Systems: Proceedings of the Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production Conference and the World Mass Customization & Personalization Conference / [ed] A.-L. Andersen, R. Andersen, T. D. Brunoe, M. S. S. Larsen, K. Nielsen, A. Napoleone & S. Kjeldgaard, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 945-952Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house builders need to integrate knowledge between product development and production to ensure producibility in the factory as well as at the build site. The traditional manufacturing industry has previously received attention in literature on the topic of knowledge integration. However, industrialized house building remains seemingly unexplored. Therefore, this paper presents a current state on knowledge integration between product and production and highlights the identified challenges. The paper also elaborates on knowledge integration differences and similarities with the traditional manufacturing industry. Identified practices involved the use of stage gate models, cross-functional teams, meetings, and partial/sub-assembly prototypes. Challenges distinguished were related to market/technology uncertainty, product/production complexity and geographical/organizational dispersion. The results are based on a case study that used semi-structured interviews within two industrialized house building companies. The paper contributes to the area of knowledge integration between product and production within industrialized house building and presents potential areas for future research.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Magnusson, T
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Lakemond, N
    Case studies on the application of interface dimensions in industrial innovation processes2006In: Technology and global integration: proceedings of the Second European Conference on Management of Technology, Birmingham, 10th to 12th September 2006 / [ed] David Bennett, Ben Clegg, Andrew Greasley, Pavel Albores, 2006, p. 328-335Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Assessment of challenges in the innovation process: Experiences from application of the interface management method2009In: Proceedings of The International 3rd Swedish Production Symposium, SPS'09, Göteborg, The Swedish Production Academy , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Managing uncertainty, complexity and dispersion in product development projects2015In: International Journal of Product Development, ISSN 1477-9056, E-ISSN 1741-8178, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 25-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports findings from the application of a new method, denoted the Interface Management Method (IMM), for managing uncertainty, complexity and dispersion in product development projects. The method was applied in three commercial projects and evaluated against desired features of product development methods reported in the literature. The findings indicate the potential of the method to support product development teams when facing challenges related to uncertainty, complexity and dispersion as it helps create focus and a dialogue on how to deal with the challenges. The paper also adds to the discourse regarding product development methods by discussing and defining four interrelated concepts: method, tool, procedure and system. Through more precise definitions, the dialogue between academics and practitioners can be refined and lead to better methods, which will ultimately result in improved product development efficiency and effectiveness.

  • 38.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Towards management of challenges in the innovation process: a case study on the application of the interface assessment tool2013In: Product: Management & Development, E-ISSN 2237-5228, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development projects face a broad range of challenges. In this paper, we report the results of acase study in which the so-called Interface assessment tool was used to assess six key challenges in a commercialproduct development project: 1) market uncertainty, 2) technological uncertainty, 3) product complexity and/ordegree of change in product, 4) production complexity and/or degree of change in production, 5) dispersion betweentechnology development and product development, and 6) dispersion between product development and production.Evaluation of the Interface assessment tool indicates consistency with ideal features that tools should have in order toaid in product development. Furthermore, the collective view of the project team members involved in the assessmentindicates that the Interface assessment tool offers valuable support for identification of uncertainties, establishmentof a joint vision of the project, and minimization of multiple interpretations of the challenges a product developmentteam might face. Consequently, this tool may contribute to sensemaking capability in a product development team.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Mälardalen University.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Adolfsson, Ann-Cathrine
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Implementation of R&D management models in global organisations2015In: Ds 80-3 Proceedings Of The 20Th International Conference On Engineering Design (Iced 15) Vol 3: Organisation And Management, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses implementation of R&D management models in global product development organisations. The study rests upon empirical material originating from five industrial companies that was collected via workshops and interviews. A number of enablers for and barriers to implementation of R&D management models have been identified. The study adds to the current theory on how companies with global organisations can ensure that the R&D management model is implemented throughout the entire organisation. In addition, the practical value refers to that the identified enablers and barriers support companies in their strive towards better adherence to the R&D management models in product development projects.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Robust Embedded Systems.
    Belov, Ilja
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Robust Embedded Systems.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Leisner, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Robust Embedded Systems.
    Thermal Analysis of an Electronic Module with a Double-sided PCB Housed in a 2-MCU Enclosure for Avionic Applications2004In: Proceedings: 2004 International Symposium on Microelectronics, November 14-18, 2004, Long Beach Convention Center, Long Beach, Ca, Washington, D.C.: IMAPS--International Microelectronics and Packaging Society , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Robust Embedded Systems.
    Belov, Ilja
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Robust Embedded Systems.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Leisner, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Robust Embedded Systems.
    Thermal design evaluation of an electronic module for helicopter applications2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42. Lakemond, N
    et al.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Magnusson, T
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    A model for managing interfaces between technology development, product development and production2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43. Lakemond, N
    et al.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Magnusson, T
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Interfaces between technology development, product development and production: critical factors and a conceptual model2007In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning (IJTIP), ISSN 1740-2832, E-ISSN 1740-2840, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 317-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfaces between technology development, product development, and production must be managed in order to avoid misfits between technology and product concepts and ensure the fit of the product design and the production process. In this paper, critical challenges related to these interfaces are studied based on in-depth case studies of ten product development projects at five manufacturing firms, two workshops and a questionnaire. Our findings indicate that factors related to synchronisation and transfer management are most critical. A tentative model is formulated as an instrument to reduce risk and uncertainty related to the interfaces.

  • 44. Lakemond, N
    et al.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Magnusson, T
    From Product Development to Production: On the Complexity of Geographical and Organizational Dispersion2006In: Proceedings of the R&D Management Conference, Lake Windermere, Cumbria, UK, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research has addressed various aspects of the interrelationships between Product development and Production. However few articles explain what the concept consist of. Those that do explain the concept are conceptually driven and not based on empirical studies. This is why this paper has addressed the often neglected issue of what the Product Development-Production (PD-P) interface really consist of. The logic in our reasoning is that before sound improvements can be suggested for the PD-P interface there is a need to understand what it is. Better insights into which the generic components of the PD-P interface are may support the integration between the two departments and hence increase efficiency in the industrial innovation processes in terms of shortened lead-times, lower costs, etc.

    The empirical data in this paper originates from case studies carried out at three Swedish manufacturing companies. The data was collected via semi-structured interviews with key actors involved in the three product development projects. The empirical findings are merged with theory into a tentative model that describes four generic components of the PD-P interface. The Technology component consists of the fit of product technology and production process technology. The Organization component involves the meeting between the production development and production organizations. The Tasks carried out during product development must also be aligned appropriately with the production tasks. The Scope component is what is being transferred between product development and production by various information tools and carriers, such as prototypes, blueprints, emails etc

    The identification of these components provides a basis for further studies and analysis of the PD-P interface. As the model is tentative, future studies should also test the validity of the model as well as search for appropriate management approaches. Different problems should be addressed from a holistic view of the PD-P interface including aggravating circumstances such as geographic distance between the departments, complex products or new production systems. In-depth studies of the individual components as well as connections between them would also generate more insight to the PD-P interface.

  • 45.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping university.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Assessing interface challenges in product development projects2013In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 40-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development projects are exposed to a number of challenges, and the significance of different challenges differs among projects. To prepare for these challenges, project managers may benefit from assessing them at an early stage of the project. This paper presents a method that can be used to assess product development challenges in terms of technological and market uncertainty, product and production complexity, and geographical and organizational dispersion. Project managers can use the results from such assessments to justify preventive action, negotiate resources and specifications, and devise processes that fit the specific characteristics of individual development projects.

  • 46.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping university.
    From Product Development to Production: On the Complexity of Geographical and Organizational Dispersion2012In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 125-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The establishment of low cost production facilities in emerging economies in Asia and Eastern-Europe has resulted in an increased organizational and geographical separation of product development and production processes. This paper elaborates on the complexity of the product development to production interface in dispersed environments and describes two different logics underlying the coordination of the product development to production transition in relation to interface complexity. The paper is based on two case studies of in total three different projects. It is argued that product/process related factors as well as organizational/geographical related factors are important in determining interface complexity. Further, a high degree of interface complexity calls for a predominant knowledge integration logic complemented with some measures of standardization in the product development to production interface. A low degree of interface complexity may be managed by a predominant task partitioning logic complemented with some integration measures.

  • 47.
    Larsson, Carina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    How to visualize performance measures in a manufacturing SME2017In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 337-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify strengths and weaknesses in the communication of performance measures and propose guidelines for the visualization of performance measures supporting continuous improvement (CI) in manufacturing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The goal is to help manufacturing SMEs improve their communication of performance measures, thereby improving performance, and strengthening the company.

    Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on both theoretical and empirical research. It begins with a literature review of theoretical guidelines for the visualization of performance measures. This theoretical information is then supplemented with a case study and a survey, both carried out at the Vara plant, a manufacturing SME with well-developed communication of performance measures. The case study involved all organizational levels in the company and focused on identifying strengths and weaknesses in visual communication of performance measures supporting CI. The information acquired from the literature survey and the case study was then used as the basis for a survey of the employees in one department as regards their perception, understanding and opinion of visual communication of performance measures. The analysis of the results led to the development of guidelines and a substantive proposal improving visualization of performance measures in this specific company, and in manufacturing SMEs in general.

    Findings: A model for the visualization of performance measures supporting CI in the company was carried out. The guidelines proposed for all such visualizations are as follows: keep the visualization as simple as possible without compromising understanding, use symbols and colors consistently, use simple words and do not include too much information in the visualization. The study also shows that it is important to support a written visualization with an oral presentation to explain the results.

    Originality/value: The originality of this paper lies in its focus on the visualization of performance measures in manufacturing SMEs and the guidelines and proposals developed. 

  • 48.
    Larsson, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Performance measurement communication supporting lean production in SMEs2014In: Performance management: Designing the high-performing organization, The Performance Management Association (PMA) , 2014, p. 714-725Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the current status of performance measurement communication to support lean production in SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper is based on theoretical and empirical studies. A literature review of existing research in performance measurement communication, focusing on lean production in SMEs, was carried out. The empirical part is based on interviews with both managers and operators in SMEs in the south of Sweden working with lean production. Twenty-four interviews in eight companies / plants were carried out.

    Findings

    The paper provides a structured overview of current research in performance measurement communication. Performance measurement communication was categorised into three parts, which taken together could support lean production implementation in SMEs. It can be concluded that, although all existing research in performance measurement and communication, there is no operational guideline of how to communicate performance measurement. From the interviews it can be seen that the companies have improved their performance measurement communication during the lean production implementation, but that there is no common way of communicating performance measurements in SMEs.

  • 49.
    Larsson, Carina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Performance measurement follow-up supporting continuous improvements in manufacturing companies: A systematic review2015In: 22nd Euroma International Annual Conference, Operations management for sustainable competitiveness, Neuchâtel, June 26 - July 1, 2015., International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance measurement has been paid a lot of attention. This paper provides a systematic review of existing research in performance measurement follow-up, which so far has been less treated. The paper suggests a categorization of the follow-up phase into the performance measurement system, input to and output from the system, and operational activities. It is concluded that there is a lack of research concerning the operational activities in the follow-up phase. It is also concluded that most of the research concerning follow-up of performance measurement does not support continuous improvement explicitly, but concerns performance measurement follow-up in general.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Lundin, Rolf
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Assessing performance of the Design-Manufacturing (DM) interface: a review of the literature2006In: Technology and Global Integration: Proceedings of the Second European Conference on Management of Technology / [ed] Bennett, D., Clegg, B., Greasley, A., Albores, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
123 1 - 50 of 126
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