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  • 1.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Bring Your Suppliers into Your Projects: Managing the Design of Work Packages in Product Development.2006In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 246-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early supplier involvement and integration is important in product development on strategic as well as on operational, project and team levels. Saab Aerospace intended to achieve early supplier involvement and high level of integration on all levels in the redesign of the aircraft JAS 39 Gripen. The research underlying this article shows that the intended strategy was only achieved on the strategic level and not on the operational project and team levels. One major reason for this was that the design of the work breakdown structure (WBS) and work packages (WP) in the product development followed the functional and departmental logic within each company resulting in incompatible structures and preventing communication and information exchange. This article intends to explore how prevailing functionally designed WBS and WP structures created barriers and to demonstrate how supplier integration can be improved by designing collaborative WBS and integrated WP. The Dependence Structure Matrix (DSM) is introduced in order to analyze, visualize and manage interdependencies and information exchange between Saab Aerospace and its supplier on different levels of the WBS and in different phases of the development process, following the logic of interdependencies and information flow, in order to support a strategy focusing on integration of suppliers on the project and team level.

  • 2.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Browning, Tyson
    M.J. Neeley School of Business, Texas Christian University (TCU), USA.
    Managing Complex Product Development Projects with Design Structure Matrices and Domain Mapping Matrices2007In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 300-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexity in product development (PD) projects can emanate from the product design, the development process, the development organization, the tools and technologies applied, the requirements to be met, and other domains.  In each of these domains, complexity arises from the numerous elements and their multitude of relationships, such as between the components of the product being developed, between the activities to develop them, and among the people doing the activities. One approach to handing this complexity is to represent and analyze these domains’ design structures or architectures.  The Design Structure Matrix (DSM) has proved to be a very helpful tool for representing and analyzing the architecture of an individual system such as a product, process, or organization. Like many tools, the DSM has been applied in a variety of areas outside its original domain, as researchers and practitioners have sought to leverage its advantages.  Along the way, however, its fundamental rules (such as being a square matrix) have been challenged.  In this paper we formalize an approach to using a Domain Mapping Matrix (DMM) to compare two DSMs of different project domains.  A DMM is a rectangular (m x n) matrix relating two DSMs, where m is the size of DSM1 and n is the size of DSM2.  DMM analysis augments traditional DSM analyses. Our comparison of DSM and DMM approaches shows that DMM analysis offers several benefits.  For example, it can help (1) capture the dynamics of PD, (2) show traceability of constraints across domains, (3) provide transparency between domains, (4) synchronize decisions across domains, (5) cross-verify domain models, (6) integrate a domain with the rest of a project or program, and (7) improve decision making among engineers and managers by providing a basis for communication and learning across domains.

  • 3.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Sandkull, Bengt
    The Use Of Dependence Structure Matrix and Domain Mapping Matrix in Managing Uncertainty in Multiple Project Situations.2005In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 193-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of complex products is performed in multi-project environment in which it is crucial to explore interdependencies and manage the uncertainty with the information exchange and the understanding of the context. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a dependence structure matrix and domain mapping matrix approach that enables the systematic identification of interdependencies and relations in a Multi-project environment. These approaches enables clarifications of assumptions, the tractability of dependencies, explores the information needed within and between different departments, projects and people. This creates a transparency and enables the synchronization of actions through transformation of information and exploration of assumptions within and between domains. The outcomes of this process are situational visibility creating direction and accountability and the learning that takes place through communicating, reflecting, understanding, and acting.

  • 4.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    A Tentative Framework for Analyzing Integration in Collaborative Manufacturing Network Settings: A case study2005In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 22, no 1-2, p. 141-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for small and medium-sized corporations to collaborate in networks in order to develop capacity, capability, and competence to perform product development and become suppliers of complete systems. The purpose of this study is to identify barriers and to develop an analytical framework of inter-organizational collaboration in network settings. In this paper we present a tentative four-dimensional framework in terms of surface of integration, scope of integration, time horizon of integration, and intensity of integration. This framework can be used to analyze how network settings are developed, in terms of structural design of the network, the design of the workflow in collaborative settings, and the aspects of handling the psychological and social boundaries between people.

  • 5.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Corporate Manufacturing Network: From Hierarchy to Self-Organizing System2006In: The International Journal of Integrated Supply Management, ISSN 1477-5360, E-ISSN 1741-8097, Vol. 2, no 1/2, p. 106-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to handle increased competition small and medium sized companies are collaborating in networks, strategic alliance, or partnership etc. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how direction and accountability is handled in network settings. The authors have performed an extensive case study of one collocated network consisting of four independent companies. This networking has enabled the companies to accept larger customer orders than no single company could handle on their own. It has also made them capable of reaching a high level of adaptation to customer demands regarding development, manufacturing, delivery, and support of the complete product. The high level of inter-company integration has created conditions for the network to develop self-organizing characteristics in terms of autopoietic and sympoietic systems. While the first focuses on the relations between companies within the network, the second focuses on relations between the network and the environment. This self-organizing approach is based on strategic conversation between companies at all organizational levels and participation of managers as well as engineers in the design of inter-and intra-organizational structures and processes. In self-organizing systems direction comes from closeness to customers and strategic dialogue between management and engineers and accountability is a consequence of high level of situational visibility and information exchange on all hierarchical levels among companies in this network.

  • 6. Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Kalmar Industries Supplier Network2012In: Design Structure Matrix Methods and Applications / [ed] Steven D. Eppinger and Tyson R. Browning, MIT Press, 2012, p. 317-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Managing Dynamics in Corporate Networks2014In: World Journal of Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2331-4222, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial issue in corporate networks is to identify to what extent different strategic and operational decisions need to be coordinated between the involved companies. In this paper we elaborate on the issue of synchronization of information flow based on interconnectivities between companies in order to coordinate a corporate network by the means of DSM, Dependence Structure Matrix. The results show that DSM can be used to identify interconnectivities among actors in a network and to identify which information that needs to be shared between companies in the network.

  • 8.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Winroth, Mats
    JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Ferrándiz, Javier
    (3) Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona.
    Josa, Oriol
    (3) Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona.
    Platform thinking in the automotive industry: managing dualism between standardization of components for large scale production and variation for market and customer2007In: Proceedings of the 18th Annual POM Conference, 2007Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Automotive industry faces two major problems. One is to develop standard platforms to reach high volumes and low cost. The other is to use platforms for enabling variation of models that suit customer needs, local market demands, and restrictions. Platform thinking embraces several industrial levels, systems integrators, global and local suppliers, and markets. How can the dualism between standardization of components and model variation be managed and which trade-offs need to be made?

    In this paper we have identified and analyzed different approaches to platform concept from technical as well as organizational, production, and product development perspectives. Platform technology improves flexibility in production and product development. However, when radical changes are made, new design of platform is not easily made, i.e. propagation of requirements and changes in models vs. platforms. When this happens, several production systems have to be entirely rebuilt causing major capital investments, redesign at suppliers etc. Hence, platform technology reduces product development flexibility.

  • 9.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Boix Miralles, Rafa
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Manufacturing Networks: Identification of Success Factors2002In: Proceedings of the 35th CIRP International Seminar On Manufacturing Systems: CIRP-ISMS 2002, 2002Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The competitive situation for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises, SME’s, has become intensified during the last few years. Large customers, such as within the automotive industry, have increased the outsourcing of their manufacturing capacity and reduced the number of suppliers. At the same time the large systems integrators place demands on their suppliers to actively participate in the product development and to take full responsibility for manufacturing as well as to deliver complete systems or subsystems. Due to the limited capacity of the suppliers, in terms of the scarcity of resources and limited knowledge base, suppliers need to collaborate in networks. The purpose of this study is to identify critical factors to successful network collaborative settings. In this paper we also introduce a four dimensional tentative framework, in terms of surface of integration, the scope of integration, the time horizon of integration, and the intensity of integration. This framework can be used to analyze how well collaborative networks are developed from three aspects of corporate integration, in terms of structural design of the network, the design of the work flow in collaborative settings, and aspect of handling the psychological and social boundaries among people, that management has to handle in order to increase the degrees of network collaboration. This tentative framework is suggested as an analytical tool that can be used in order to understand how different collaborative networks are developed in terms of the network constellation, output of the collaborative process, as well as duration and robustness of the network.

  • 10.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Linking Manufacturing Strategies to Design of Production Systems in Collaborative Manufacturing Settings2003In: Proceedings of the POM 2003 Conference, 2003Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Competition has forced companies to collaborate in manufacturing network settings to be capably to deliver complete subsystems. We suggest in this paper an analytical tool to analyze the linkages between manufacturing strategies and design of production systems in collaborative manufacturing network settings. We show how this analytical tool might be used to analyze how companies in such networks synchronize their manufacturing strategies and production systems in terms of competitive priorities and synergies between them. The findings in this paper are based on a series of interviews with people at companies in a collaborative network delivering heavy vehicles.

  • 11.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manufacturing Strategies: Congruence Of Manufacturing Processes Within A Supply Chain2002In: Proceedings of the 13th Annual Conference of the Production and Operations Management Society: POM-2002, 2002Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    It is extremely important that companies, working together in a system manufacturer/sub supplier relationship, agree on which strategic factors to prioritize. A mismatch could make the cooperation less successful than if they agree on the competitive priorities. A tool for evaluating the congruence between the manufacturing strategies and the existing manufacturing system has been described by Professor John Miltenburg (1995). Säfsten and Winroth (2001) developed this tool further. The purpose of this paper is to show one example of using this tool for a supply chain, i.e. for a system manufacturer and his sub suppliers.

  • 12.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Björkvik, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Öberg, Christina
    LiU, EKI.
    Manufacturing Strategies: Implications during transition towards collaborative manufacturing2003In: Proceedings of “One World? One view of OM?: The Challenges of Integrating Research and Practice”, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on findings from collaboration between a medium sized manufacturing company, traditionally manufacturing components to system integrators, and an inventor company. The companies are striving to develop, manufacture, and market a new product on a new market. Our research question is to identify barriers to product and market diversification. The study has been performed as a number of interviews and work-shops, where barriers and possibilities have been identified. In this paper we suggest an expeditionary approach to managing diversification as an alternative to traditional approaches, technology push and market pull. The expeditionary approach stresses that, in the context of SME:s, a network of companies needs to collaborate intensively with each other as well as with customers from the very early initiation of business idea, identifying the customer needs and functional requirements of the product, while simultaneously working on product specifications, manufacturing process design and marketing in a collaborative network of partners.

  • 13.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Boix Miralles, Rafa
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Manufacturing Networks: Critical Factors to Successful Collaboration2004In: CIRP Journal of Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 33, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The competitive situation for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises, SME’s, has become intensified during the last few years. Large customers, such as within the automotive industry, have increased the outsourcing of their manufacturing capacity and reduced the number of suppliers. At the same time the large systems integrators place demands on their suppliers to actively participate in the product development and to take full responsibility for manufacturing as well as to deliver complete systems or subsystems. Due to the limited capacity of the suppliers, in terms of the scarcity of resources and limited knowledge base, suppliers need to collaborate in networks. The purpose of this study is to identify critical factors to successful network collaborative settings. In this paper we also introduce a four dimensional tentative framework, in terms of surface of integration, the scope of integration, the time horizon of integration, and the intensity of integration. This framework can be used to analyze how well collaborative networks are developed from three aspects of corporate integration, in terms of structural design of the network, the design of the work flow in collaborative settings, and aspect of handling the psychological and social boundaries among people, that management has to handle in order to increase the degrees of network collaboration. This tentative framework is suggested as an analytical tool that can be used in order to understand how different collaborative networks are developed in terms of the network constellation, output of the collaborative process, as well as duration and robustness of the network.

  • 14.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Fernández Aguilar, Alfonso
    Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Flaquer Borràs, Oriol
    Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Dynamics of sourcing A. & , O., 2007, , ,: Strategic implications of outsourcing and insourcing2007In: Proceedings of the 14th International Annual EurOMA Conference- Managing Operations in an Expanding Europe, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a strategic manufacturing perspective, companies are facing challenges in finding a balance in what they do on their own and what their suppliers do. This balance requires some times that companies are outsourcing and sometimes insourcing activities. One conclusion is that outsourcing should be considered as a strategic decision that is not easily made by purchasing or operations departments. Many companies tend to outsource more and more of their manufacturing to specialists, which however does not mean that companies can afford to loose their competence in manufacturing. It is still essential that the companies, even though another company performs parts of the actual manufacturing, understand the special conditions for manufacturing. Otherwise they are not in a position where they can discuss product development, specification of the different tasks that they want the contractors to do, and they can certainly not make the right decisions when buying components and parts from suppliers. Outsourcing decisions also need to be strategically justifiable; outsourcing only for cost reasons is rarely successful. Outsourcing should provide other advantages in terms of improvement of competitive priorities. For different reasons, it may also end up in a situation where the company needs to insource previously outsourced activities.

1 - 14 of 14
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