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  • 1. Alfredsson, Lars
    et al.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Jobstrain och riskfaktorer för hjärtkärlsjukdom2002In: Psykosocial belastning och riskfaktorer för hjärt-kärlsjukdom: minisymposium i WOLF-projektet 8 februari 2001, Stockholm: Arbetslivsinstitutet , 2002, p. 1-2Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2. Alfredsson, Lars
    et al.
    Hammar, Niklas
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Knutsson, Anders
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Theorell, Töres
    Westerholm, Peter
    Job strain and major risk factors for coronary heart disease among employed males and females in a Swedish study on work, lipids and fibrinogen.2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 238-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ander, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Bergnéhr, Disa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Where and with whom – contexts of 15-year-olds’ drunkennessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ander, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Bergnéhr, Disa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Onset of substance use in early adolescenceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bouillon, Kim
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hamer, Mark
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Sabia, Severine
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Gale, Catharine R.
    MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Batty, G. David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Measures of frailty in population-based studies: An overview2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although research productivity in the field of frailty has risen exponentially in recent years, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the measurement of this syndrome. This overview offers three services: first, we provide a comprehensive catalogue of current frailty measures; second, we evaluate their reliability and validity; third, we report on their popularity of use.

    Methods: In order to identify relevant publications, we searched MEDLINE (from its inception in 1948 to May 2011); scrutinized the reference sections of the retrieved articles; and consulted our own files. An indicator of the frequency of use of each frailty instrument was based on the number of times it had been utilized by investigators other than the originators.

    Results: Of the initially retrieved 2,166 papers, 27 original articles described separate frailty scales. The number (range: 1 to 38) and type of items (range of domains: physical functioning, disability, disease, sensory impairment, cognition, nutrition, mood, and social support) included in the frailty instruments varied widely. Reliability and validity had been examined in only 26% (7/27) of the instruments. The predictive validity of these scales for mortality varied: for instance, hazard ratios/odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for mortality risk for frail relative to non-frail people ranged from 1.21 (0.78; 1.87) to 6.03 (3.00; 12.08) for the Phenotype of Frailty and 1.57 (1.41; 1.74) to 10.53 (7.06; 15.70) for the Frailty Index. Among the 150 papers which we found to have used at least one of the 27 frailty instruments, 69% (n = 104) reported on the Phenotype of Frailty, 12% (n = 18) on the Frailty Index, and 19% (n = 28) on one of the remaining 25 instruments.

    Conclusions: Although there are numerous frailty scales currently in use, reliability and validity have rarely been examined. The most evaluated and frequently used measure is the Phenotype of Frailty.

  • 6.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda B.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Gatz, Margrete
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Being overweight in midlife is associated with lower cognitive ability and steeper cognitive decline in late life2010In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 65A, no 1, p. 57-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although an increasing body of evidence links being overweight in midlife with an increased risk for dementia in late life, no studies have examined the association between being overweight in midlife and cognitive ability in late life. Our aim was to examine the association between being overweight in midlife as measured by body mass index (BMI) and cognitive ability assessed over time. METHODS: Participants in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study Aging were derived from a population-based sample. The participants completed baseline surveys in 1963 or 1973 (mean age 41.6 years, range 25-63 years). The surveys included questions about height, weight, diseases, and lifestyle factors. Beginning in 1986, the same individuals were assessed on neuropsychological tests every 3 years (except in 1995) until 2002. During the study period, 781 individuals who were 50 years and older (60% women) had at least one complete neuropsychological assessment. A composite score of general cognitive ability was derived from the cognitive test battery for each measurement occasion. RESULTS: Latent growth curve models adjusted for twinness showed that persons with higher midlife BMI scores had significantly lower general cognitive ability and significantly steeper longitudinal decline than their thinner counterparts. The association did not change substantially when persons who developed dementia during the study period were excluded from the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Higher midlife BMI scores precede lower general cognitive ability and steeper cognitive decline in both men and women. The association does not seem to be mediated by an increased risk for dementia

  • 7.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Göteborgs Universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Gatz, Margaret
    University of Southern California.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    University of California Riverside.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Midlife body mass index and late life cognitive functioning: findings from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging2008In: Conference of Life History Research Society, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Margaret, Gatz
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Body mass index across midlife and cognitive change in late life2013In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 296-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High midlife body mass index (BMI) has been linked to a greater risk of dementia in late life, but few have studied the effect of BMI across midlife on cognitive abilities and cognitive change in a dementia-free sample.

    Methods: We investigated the association between BMI, measured twice across midlife (mean age 40 and 61 years, respectively), and cognitive change in four domains across two decades in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging.

    Results: Latent growth curve models fitted to data from 657 non-demented participants showed that persons who were overweight/obese in early midlife had significantly lower cognitive performance across domains in late life and significantly steeper decline in perceptual speed, adjusting for cardio-metabolic factors. Both underweight and overweight/obesity in late midlife were associated with lower cognitive abilities in late life. However, the association between underweight and low cognitive abilities did not remain significant when weight decline between early and late midlife was controlled for.

    Conclusion: There is a negative effect on cognitive abilities later in life related to being overweight/obese across midlife. Moreover, weight decline across midlife rather than low weight in late midlife per se was associated with low cognitive abilities. Weight patterns across midlife may be prodromal markers of late life cognitive health.

  • 9.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Agreement between self-reported and measured height, weight and body mass index in old age: a longitudinal study with 20 years of follow-up2010In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 445-451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Is self-reported Body Mass Index a valid and reliable measure in old age?: Findings from the Longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging2009In: 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of Gerontological Society of America, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Gatz, Margaret
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Midlife Body Mass Index and Longitudinal Trajectories of Cognitive Change in Late Life: findings from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging2009In: 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of Gerontological Society of America, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dahl, Anna K
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda B
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Is Self-reported Body Mass Index Less Reliable in Late Life?  2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI) based on self-reported height and weight is a widely used measure of adiposity in epidemiological research. Knowledge about the accuracy of these measures in late life is scarce, and especially if there is intra-individual changes over time.

    Methods: Seven hundred seventy-four men and women, aged 40 to 88 at baseline (mean age 63.9), in The Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging self-reported and had their height and weight measured by experienced research nurses five times during a twenty year period. BMI was calculated as weight (kilos)/height (meter)2.

    Results: There was significant correlation between self-reported and measured height (0.97-0.98), weight (0.97-0.98), and BMI (0.93-0.95) at each measurement occasion, and substantial agreement for BMI as a categorical variable (Kappa coefficient 0.72-0.81). Latent growth curve modeling showed an increase in the mean difference between self-reported and measured values over time for height (0.04 cm/year) and BMI (0.02 kg/m2/year), but not for weight.

    Conclusions: There is a very small significant increase in the mean difference between self-reported and measured BMI with aging, mainly due to unawareness of changes in height, which probably would not affect the results when self-reported BMI is used as a continuous variable in longitudinal studies.

  • 13. Dragano, Nico
    et al.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Nyberg, Solja T
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bjorner, Jakob B
    Borritz, Marianne
    Burr, Hermann
    Erbel, Raimund
    Fahlén, Göran
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Hamer, Mark
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Knutsson, Anders
    Madsen, Ida E H
    Nielsen, Martin L
    Nordin, Maria
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Pejtersen, Jan H
    Pentti, Jaana
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Salo, Paula
    Schupp, Jürgen
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Theorell, Töres
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Westerholm, Peter J M
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Zins, Marie
    Batty, G David
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Effort-reward imbalance at work and incident coronary heart disease: a multi-cohort study of 90,164 individuals2017In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 619-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease.

    METHODS: This multi-cohort study (the 'IPD-Work' consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful weappork in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease at baseline was assessed by validated effort-reward imbalance and job strain questionnaires. We defined incident coronary heart disease as the first non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. Study-specific estimates were pooled by random-effects meta-analysis.

    RESULTS: At baseline, 31.7% of study members reported effort-reward imbalance at work and 15.9% reported job strain. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, 1078 coronary events were recorded. After adjustment for potential confounders, a hazard ratio of 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.00-1.35) was observed for effort-reward imbalance compared to no imbalance. The hazard ratio was 1.16 (1.01-1.34) for having either effort-reward imbalance or job strain, and 1.41 (1.12-1.76) for having both these stressors compared to having neither effort-reward imbalance nor job strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with effort-reward imbalance at work have an increased risk of coronary heart disease, and this appears to be independent of job strain experienced. These findings support expanding focus beyond just job strain in future research on work stress.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  • 14.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden .
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden.
    Zarit, Steven
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Penn State University, State College, USA.
    Reciprocal patterns of support of very old people and their families2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aging population is often considered as a threat that will deplete family and societal resources. Yet older people may be a resource, giving support and care to their family. The aim of this study is to analyze patterns of giving and receiving support by the oldest old with their family. Method: Data were used from the OCTO2- study, a Swedish population-based sample of 171 women and 156 men, 75–90  years. Respondents completed the Intergenerational Support Index to examine patterns of receiving and giving care and support and factors associated with support exchanges. Results: Results showed that the oldest old gave as much support as they received within the family. Most of the older persons receiving formal help from the community (79%) continued giving support to family. The most common types of support given and received within the family were emotional (89% given, 90% received) and practical (44% given, 46% received). Older persons gave more financial support (26%) than they received (2%). Age, gender, functioning in daily life activities and satisfaction with life were associated with giving different types of family support. Conclusion: Old-old people in Sweden are not just consumers of care, but are involved in reciprocal patterns as receivers and providers of care and support. It is not a simple opposition between being a giver and receiver of informal support simultaneously, but more knowledge is needed about the complex interplay between various form of care and support.

  • 15.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Head, Jenny
    University College London.
    Short- and long-term effects of major organisational change on minor psychiatric disorder and self-rated health: Results from the Whitehall II study2013In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 70, no 10, p. 688-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate short- and long-term effects of major organisational change on minor psychiatric disorder and self-rated health for women and men in different employment grades.

    Methods Minor psychiatric disorder and self-rated health among 6710 British civil servants (1993 women and 4717 men) in three employment grades from the Whitehall II study were examined from 1985 to 1988 under stable employment conditions. The short-term effects of organisational change were investigated in 1991–1993 after a time of major restructuring aiming at increasing the influence of market forces in the civil service and the long-term effects were investigated in 1997–1999.

    Results Those who had experienced organisational change and those who anticipated organisational change reported more negative short-term health effects (minor psychiatric disorder and poor self-rated health) compared with those who reported no change. No major differences were found depending on employment grade or gender. The negative health effects had diminished during 1997–1999 for those who reported that a major change had happened before 1991–1993. Those who anticipated an organisational change in 1991–1993 still reported more ill-health in 1997–1999 (both minor psychiatric disorder and self-reported health) than those in the comparison group.

    Conclusions The results indicate that organisational change affects employees’ health negatively in the short term but also that it is possible to recover from such negative effects. As it was not possible to discern any definite difference between the gender and grades, the results point at the importance of working proactively to implement organisational change for women and men at all levels.

  • 16. Ferrie, Jane E.
    et al.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Jokela, Markus
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Batty, G. David
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Burr, Hermann
    Dragano, Nico
    Elovainio, Marko
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Koskinen, Aki
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Kumari, Meena
    Nielsen, Martin L
    Nordin, Maria
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Pahkin, Krista
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Salo, Paula
    Shipley, Martin J
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    Tabák, Adam
    Theorell, Töres
    Väänänen, Ari
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job insecurity and risk of diabetes: a meta-analysis of individual participant data2016In: CMJA. Canadian Medical Association Journal. Onlineutg. Med tittel: ECMAJ. ISSN 1488-2329, ISSN 0820-3946, E-ISSN 1488-2329, Vol. 188, no 17-18, p. E447-E455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Job insecurity has been associated with certain health outcomes. We examined the role of job insecurity as a risk factor for incident diabetes.

    METHODS: We used individual participant data from 8 cohort studies identified in 2 open-access data archives and 11 cohort studies participating in the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium. We calculated study-specific estimates of the association between job insecurity reported at baseline and incident diabetes over the follow-up period. We pooled the estimates in a meta-analysis to produce a summary risk estimate.

    RESULTS: The 19 studies involved 140 825 participants from Australia, Europe and the United States, with a mean follow-up of 9.4 years and 3954 incident cases of diabetes. In the preliminary analysis adjusted for age and sex, high job insecurity was associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes compared with low job insecurity (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.30). In the multivariable-adjusted analysis restricted to 15 studies with baseline data for all covariates (age, sex, socioeconomic status, obesity, physical activity, alcohol and smoking), the association was slightly attenuated (adjusted OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.24). Heterogeneity between the studies was low to moderate (age- and sex-adjusted model: I2 = 24%, p = 0.2; multivariable-adjusted model: I2 = 27%, p = 0.2). In the multivariable-adjusted analysis restricted to high-quality studies, in which the diabetes diagnosis was ascertained from electronic medical records or clinical examination, the association was similar to that in the main analysis (adjusted OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.04-1.35).

    INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that self-reported job insecurity is associated with a modest increased risk of incident diabetes. Health care personnel should be aware of this association among workers reporting job insecurity.

  • 17.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Fysisk aktivitet och riskfaktorer för hjärt-kärlsjukdom2002In: Psykosocial belastning och riskfaktorer för hjärt-kärlsjukdom: minisymposium i WOLF-projektet 8 februari 2001, Stockholm: Arbetslivsinstitutet , 2002, p. 11-14Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Motion och risken för hjärtinfarkt2006In: Svensk idrottsmedicin, ISSN 1103-7652, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 2p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Normalt åldrande2008In: Den äldre parkinsonpatienten: Utredning, diagnostik och åtgärder för individuellt omhändertagande, Stockholm: Svensk Geriatrisk Förening , 2008, p. 7-9Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical activity and myocardial infarction: Epidemiological studies on the association between various types of physical activity and the risk of myocardial infarction, including certain aspects of methodology2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Work stress and physical inactivity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    de Faire, Ulf
    Knutsson, Anders
    Westerholm, Peter
    Fysisk aktivitet starkt relaterat till HDL-kolesterol2002In: Hygiea, 2002, p. 193-194Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Alfredsson, Lars S
    de Faire, Ulf H
    Knutsson, Anders
    Westerholm, Peter J M
    Leisure time, occupational and household physical activity, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in working men and women: the WOLF study2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 324-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Arenhall, Eva
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Steinke, Elaine E.
    School of Nursing, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas, USA.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nilsson, Ulrica G.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Perceptions of intimate relationships in partners before and after a patient's myocardial infarction2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, p. 2196-2204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To describe and explore how partners rate their intimate relationship before and after the patients' first myocardial infarction. A further aim was to investigate the association between partners' rating of their intimate relationship and self-rated health.

    Background To date, information on how partners experience the intimate relationship before and after a patient's myocardial infarction is sparse.

    Design A descriptive and exploratory design with longitudinal data collection.

    Methods The study comprised 127 partners, aged 34–87 years. Data collection included self-reported information on socio-demographic data, intimate relationship and self-rated health one year before and one year after patients' first myocardial infarction. Intimate relationship was assessed by the Swedish version of the Relationship Assessment Scale. Self-rated health was evaluated by the EuroQoL visual analogue scale.

    Results In general, partners reported high satisfaction with their intimate relationship both before and after the patients' myocardial infarction. Women reported somewhat lower ratings in their intimate relationship than men before the myocardial infarction. Women increased their ratings after one year, while men on average decreased their ratings. Partners with higher education reported lower ratings for intimate relationship after one year. Those with children living at home rated intimate relationship lower than those without children living at home after one year. Partners' self-rated health status was stable over time. No significant association between intimate relationship and self-rated health was found.

    Conclusions This study provides important insights regarding couples' relationships from the perspective of the partner. Socio-demographic factors such as sex, educational level, having children living at home and employment status may influence how the relationship, from the partners' perspective, is affected by a myocardial infarction event.

    Relevance to clinical practice This study provides insight into how partners rate their intimate relationship and self-rated health over time before and after patients' myocardial infarction.

  • 25.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Batty, David
    Tabak, Adam
    Brunner, Eric
    Kumari, Meena
    Shipley, Martin
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Weight gain is associated with greater increase in CRP among overweight and obese than among normal weight people2011In: Obesity Reviews: (Suppl. 1), 2011, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Batty, David
    University College London.
    Tabák, Adam
    University College London.
    Brunner, Eric
    University College London.
    Kumari, Meena
    University College London.
    Shipley, Martin
    University College London.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    University College London.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    University College London.
    Association between change in body composition and change in inflammatory markers: An 11-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study2010In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 95, no 12, p. 5370-5374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, but the long-term effects of weight change on inflammation are unknown.

    Objective: The aim was to examine the association of change in weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference with change in C-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6 and to assess whether this association is modified by baseline obesity status.

    Design and Setting: The design was a prospective cohort study among civil servants (the Whitehall II Study, UK). We used data from two clinical screenings carried out in 1991–1993 and 2002–2004 (mean follow-up, 11.3 yr).

    Participants: We studied 2496 men and 1026 women [mean age, 49.4 (SD = 6.0) yr at baseline] with measurements on inflammatory markers and anthropometry at both baseline and follow-up.

    Main Outcome Measures: We measured change in serum CRP and IL-6 during follow-up.

    Results: The mean increases in CRP and IL-6 were 0.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07–0.09] mg/liter and 0.04 (95% CI, 0.03–0.05) pg/ml per 1-kg increase in body weight during follow-up. Study members with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2 at baseline had an average increase in CRP of 0.06 (95% CI, 0.05–0.08) mg/liter per 1-kg increase in body weight, whereas the increase in those who were overweight (25 BMI < 30 kg/m2) and obese (BMI 30 kg/m2) was greater: 0.08 (95% CI, 0.06–0.09) mg/liter and 0.11 (95% CI, 0.07–0.14) mg/liter, respectively (P value for interaction = 0.002). Similar patterns were observed for changes in BMI and waist circumference.

    Conclusions: Those who were overweight or obese at baseline had a greater absolute increase in CRP per unit increase in weight, BMI, and waist circumference than people who were normal weight.

  • 27.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Reuterwall, Christina
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Interaction between occupational physical activity, exercise and household work regarding the risk of myocardial infarction2004In: The 5th International Heart Health Conference, Milano, Italien, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Reuterwall, Christina
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Interaktion mellan fysisk aktivitet och övervikt med avseende på risken för hjärtinfarkt2004In: Det metabola syndromet och dess konsekvenser, Jönköping, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Reuterwall, Christina
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Alfredsson, Lars
    The effect of leisure-time physical activity on the risk of acute myocardial infarction depending on body mass index: a population-based case-control study.2006In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 6, p. 296-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    De Faire, Ulf
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Reuterwall, Christina
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Alfredsson, Lars
    The risk of acute myocardial infarction: interactions of types of physical activity.2004In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 573-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Nyberg, Solja
    Zins, Marie
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Westerholm, Peter
    Väänänen, Ari
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Theorell, Töres
    Suominen, Sakari
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Sabia, Severine
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Pentti, Jaana
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Nordin, Maria
    Nielsen, Martin
    Marmot, Michael
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Madsen, Ida
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Kumari, Meena
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Koskinen, Aki
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Knutsson, Anders
    Kittel, France
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Joensuu, Matti
    Houtman, Irene
    Hooftman, Wendela
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Geuskens, Goedele
    Ferrie, Jane
    Erbel, Raimund
    Dragano, Nico
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Clays, Els
    Casini, Annalisa
    Burr, Hermann
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bonenfant, Sebastien
    Bjorner, Jakob
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Hamer, Mark
    Batty, David
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity: An Individual-Participant Meta-analysis of up to 170 000 Men and Women2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Nyberg, Solja
    Zins, Marie
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Westerholm, Peter
    Väänänen, Ari
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Theorell, Töres
    Suominen, Sakari
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Sabia, Severine
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Pentti, Jaana
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Nordin, Maria
    Nielsen, Martin
    Marmot, Michael
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Madsen, Ida
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Kumari, Meena
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Koskinen, Aki
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Knutsson, Anders
    Kittel, France
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Joensuu, Matti
    Houtman, Irene
    Hooftman, Wendela
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Geuskens, Goedele
    Ferrie, Jane
    Erbel, Raimund
    Dragano, Nico
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Clays, Els
    Casini, Annalisa
    Burr, Hermann
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bonenfant, Sebastien
    Bjorner, Jakob
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Hamer, Mark
    Batty, David
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity: An Individual-Participant Meta-analysis of up to 170,000 Men and Women2012In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 176, no 12, p. 1078-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unfavorable work characteristics, such as low job control and too high or too low job demands, have been suggested to increase the likelihood of physical inactivity during leisure time, but this has not been verified in large-scale studies. The authors combined individual-level data from 14 European cohort studies (baseline years from 1985–1988 to 2006–2008) to examine the association between unfavorable work characteristics and leisure-time physical inactivity in a total of 170,162 employees (50% women; mean age, 43.5 years). Of these employees, 56,735 were reexamined after 2–9 years. In cross-sectional analyses, the odds for physical inactivity were 26% higher (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.38) for employees with high-strain jobs (low control/high demands) and 21% higher (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.31) for those with passive jobs (low control/low demands) compared with employees in low-strain jobs (high control/low demands). In prospective analyses restricted to physically active participants, the odds of becoming physically inactive during follow-up were 21% and 20% higher for those with high-strain (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.32) and passive (odds ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.30) jobs at baseline. These data suggest that unfavorable work characteristics may have a spillover effect on leisure-time physical activity.

  • 33.
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nyberg, Solja T
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bjorner, Jakob B
    Borritz, Marianne
    Burr, Hermann
    Dragano, Nico
    Geuskens, Goedele A
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Hamer, Mark
    Hooftman, Wendela E
    Houtman, Irene L
    Joensuu, Matti
    Jokela, Markus
    Knutsson, Anders
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Koskinen, Aki
    Kumari, Meena
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Madsen, Ida E H
    Hanson, Linda L Magnusson
    Nielsen, Martin L
    Nordin, Maria
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Pentti, Jaana
    Pejtersen, Jan H
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Salo, Paula
    Shipley, Martin J
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Suominen, Sakari B
    Theorell, Töres
    Toppinen-Tanner, Salla
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Väänänen, Ari
    Westerholm, Peter J M
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Zins, Marie
    Britton, Annie
    Brunner, Eric J
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Batty, G David
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job Strain and the Risk of Stroke: An Individual-Participant Data Meta-Analysis2015In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 557-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Psychosocial stress at work has been proposed to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, its role as a risk factor for stroke is uncertain.

    METHODS: We conducted an individual-participant-data meta-analysis of 196 380 males and females from 14 European cohort studies to investigate the association between job strain, a measure of work-related stress, and incident stroke.

    RESULTS: In 1.8 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up 9.2 years), 2023 first-time stroke events were recorded. The age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for job strain relative to no job strain was 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.05;1.47) for ischemic stroke, 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.75;1.36) for hemorrhagic stroke, and 1.09 (95% confidence interval, 0.94;1.26) for overall stroke. The association with ischemic stroke was robust to further adjustment for socioeconomic status.

    CONCLUSION: Job strain may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, but further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting job strain would reduce stroke risk beyond existing preventive strategies.

  • 34.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå Universitet.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala universitet.
    The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF Study2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, p. 1-7, article id 371905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder. Several life-style factors have been identified as risk factors for AF, but less is known about the impact of work-related stress. This study aims to evaluate the association between work-related stress, defined as job strain, and risk of AF. Methods. Data from the Swedish WOLF study was used, comprising 10,121 working men and women. Job strain was measured by the demand-control model. Information on incident AF was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between job strain and AF risk. Results. In total, 253 incident AF cases were identified during a total follow-up time of 132,387 person-years. Job strain was associated with AF risk in a time-dependent manner, with stronger association after 10.7 years of follow-up (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.10–3.36 after 10.7 years, versus HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67–1.83 before 10.7 years). The results pointed towards a dose-response relationship when taking accumulated exposure to job strain over time into account. Conclusion. This study provides support to the hypothesis that work-related stress defined as job strain is linked to an increased risk of AF.

  • 35.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Institutet för Miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Westerholm, Peter
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Indications of recall bias found in a retrospective study of physical activity and myocardial infarction2008In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, E-ISSN 1878-5921, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 840-847Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Uppsala University.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot and the risk of atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF study2016In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 73, no Suppl 1, p. 140-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation is a common heart rhythm disorder affecting 1-3% of the adult population. Despite being such a prevalent disorder, the knowledge about risk factors preceding the disease is very limited, especially regarding work related factors. The aim of the present study was to estimate the association between the 310 exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot in the work environment and the risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Method

    Data from the Swedish Work, Lipids and Fibrinogen (WOLF) study was used. The study includes working men and women in the counties of Stockholm, Västernorrland and Jämtland (n=10416). The baseline data collection was carried out 1992-1998. Atrial fibrillation cases were identified by the Swedish national hospital discharge register.

    Results

    During a median follow-up time of 13.6 years, 252 incident cases with atrial fibrillation were identified. In total, 1249 (12.5%) people reported exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot at baseline. The age and sex adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for atrial fibrillation was 1.01 (95% CI 0.70-1.46) for the exposed group compared with the unexposed group. Further adjustment for socio-economic status, lifestyle factors, job strain, waist circumference and hypertension did not alter the estimated HR in any substantial way (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.66-1.48). However, when combining the exposure with smoking status, an increased risk for atrial fibrillation was observed among those exposed both to smoking and exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot compared to non-smokers who were not exposed (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.07-3.12).

    Exposure-Smoking status   HR*    95% CI

    Non exposed-Non-smoker   1         -

    Non exposed-Smoker         1.09   0.78-1.52

    Exposed-Non-smoker         0.69    0.40-1.19

    Exposed-Smoker               1.83   1.07-3.12

    *Adjusted for SES, life-style, job strain, waist circumference and hypertension

    Conclusion

    Preliminary results indicate that exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot in combination with smoking is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation.

  • 37.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Knutsson, Anders
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Westerholm, Peter
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Associations between physically demanding work and life-style: results from the Swedish WOLF study2014In: Human factors in organizational design and management -11 & Nordic ergonomics society annual conference -46 / [ed] Broberg O, Santa Monica: The IEA Press , 2014, p. 45-45Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Knutsson, Anders
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Westerholm, Peter
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Associations betwwen physically demanding work and life-style: Results from the Swedish WOLF study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Nyberg, Solja
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Theorell, Töres
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Agreement between alternative versions of Karasek's job demand-control scale: The IPD-Work Consortium2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Nyberg, Solja T
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Alfredsson, Lars
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Batty, G David
    Bonenfant, Sébastien
    Casini, Annalisa
    Clays, Els
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Kittel, France
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Knutsson, Anders
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L
    Nordin, Maria
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Suominen, Sakari
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Westerholm, Peter
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Zins, Marie
    Theorell, Töres
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Comparison of alternative versions of the job demand-control scales in 17 European cohort studies: the IPD-Work consortium2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, no 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Job strain (i.e., high job demands combined with low job control) is a frequently used indicator of harmful work stress, but studies have often used partial versions of the complete multi-item job demands and control scales. Understanding whether the different instruments assess the same underlying concepts has crucial implications for the interpretation of findings across studies, harmonisation of multi-cohort data for pooled analyses, and design of future studies. As part of the 'IPD-Work' (Individual-participant-data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium, we compared different versions of the demands and control scales available in 17 European cohort studies.

    Methods Six of the 17 studies had information on the complete scales and 11 on partial scales. Here, we analyse individual level data from 70 751 participants of the studies which had complete scales (5 demand items, 6 job control items).

    Results We found high Pearson correlation coefficients between complete scales of job demands and control relative to scales with at least three items (r > 0.90) and for partial scales with two items only (r = 0.76-0.88). In comparison with scores from the complete scales, the agreement between job strain definitions was very good when only one item was missing in either the demands or the control scale (kappa > 0.80); good for job strain assessed with three demand items and all six control items (kappa > 0.68) and moderate to good when items were missing from both scales (kappa = 0.54-0.76). The sensitivity was >0.80 when only one item was missing from either scale, decreasing when several items were missing in one or both job strain subscales.

    Conclusions Partial job demand and job control scales with at least half of the items of the complete scales, and job strain indices based on one complete and one partial scale, seemed to assess the same underlying concepts as the complete survey instruments.

  • 41.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Westerholm, Peter
    Job strain and the risk of atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fysisk aktivitet och träning - möjlig prevention av arbetsrelaterade belastningsbesvär2015Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet och Futurum, Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Validitet och reliabilitet för Life-Space Assessment (LSA) - ett instrument för bedömning av äldre personers mobilitet2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Förmågan och möjligheter att förflytta (mobilitet) begränsas ofta i senare delen av livet, med negativa konsekvenser fördelaktighet i dagliga och sociala aktiviteter. Såväl i praktisk verksamhet som för forskning behövs instrument som kanbedöma mobilitet. The Life Space Assessment (LSA), utvecklat i USA, är bedömer en individs mobilitet genom attfokusera på förmågan att ta sig till olika “life-spaces”, från rummet där personen sover till platser bortom hemorten undersenaste månaden. LSA beaktar dessutom hur ofta detta sker, och om det sker med hjälpmedel eller hjälp av annanperson.

    Syfte: Syftet var att undersöka samtidig validitet och testa reliabilitet av LSAs svenska version.

    Metod: LSA översattes till svenska och inkluderades tillsammans med andra hälsorelaterade mått i en populationsbaserad studiemed slumpmässigt utvalda personer mellan 75 och 90 år (medelålder 81 år) i enskilt boende. LSA summerades till fyrapoängsummor, dvs total, oberoende, assisterad och maximal life-space poäng. 298 individer ingick i reliabilitetstudienoch besvarade LSA vid två tillfällen med 14 dagars mellanrum. 312 individer ingick i validitetsstudien där LSA jämfördesmed andra mobilitetsrelaterade mått.

    Resultat/preliminärt resultat: Det fanns inga signifikanta skillnader mellan skattningarna över tid för LSA fyra poängsummor. Medelvärdet för total life-space poäng var t ex 65 (22) och 65 (23) (max 120). Korrelationsvärden (ICC) mellan 0.84-0.94 visar på god till utmärktreliabilitet för total, oberoende och assisterad LSA. Vad gäller validitet påvisas signifikanta (p<0.01) och måttligt till godakorrelationer (0.50- 0.75) mellan LSAs fyra poängsummor och förmåga till förflyttning (överflyttning, balans, uppresningoch gångförmåga), transport (vardagliga resor och nöjesresor), och aktivitet i samhället (inköp och fritid)

    Slutsats: Den svenska versionen av LSA har god validitet samt god till utmärkt reliabilitet och kan med förtroende användas för attbedöma mobilitet hos äldre i enskilt boende.

  • 44.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Futurum – the Academy for Healthcare, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Concurrent validity of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, article id 181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), developed in the USA, is an instrument focusing on mobility with respect to reaching different areas defined as life-spaces, extending from the room where the person sleeps to mobility outside one's hometown. A newly translated Swedish version of the LSA (LSA-S) has been tested for test-retest reliability, but the validity remains to be tested. The purpose of the present study was to examine the concurrent validity of the LSA-S, by comparing and correlating the LSA scores to other measures of mobility.

    METHOD: The LSA was included in a population-based study of health, functioning and mobility among older persons in Sweden, and the present analysis comprised 312 community-dwelling participants. To test the concurrent validity, the LSA scores were compared to a number of other mobility-related variables, including the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) as well as "stair climbing", "transfers", "transportation", "food shopping", "travel for pleasure" and "community activities". The LSA total mean scores for different levels of the other mobility-related variables, and measures of correlation were calculated.

    RESULTS: Higher LSA total mean scores were observed with higher levels of all the other mobility related variables. Most of the correlations between the LSA and the other mobility variables were large (r = 0.5-1.0) and significant at the 0.01 level. The LSA total score, as well as independent life-space and assistive life-space correlated with transportation (0.63, 0.66, 0.64) and food shopping (0.55, 0.58, 0.55). Assistive life-space also correlated with SPPB (0.47). With respect to maximal life-space, the correlations with the mobility-related variables were generally lower (below 0.5), probably since this aspect of life-space mobility is highly influenced by social support and is not so dependent on the individual's own physical function.

    CONCLUSION: LSA was shown to be a valid measure of mobility when using the LSA total, independent LS or assistive LSA.

  • 45.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, EIeonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, United States.
    Finkel, Deborah
    School of Social Sciences, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, United States.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults2018In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 74, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Research indicate that cognitive impairment might be related to hospitalization, but little is known about these effects over time.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess cognitive change before and after hospitalization among older adults in a population-based longitudinal study with up to 25 years of follow-up.

    METHOD:

    A longitudinal study on 828 community living men and women aged 50-86 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to The Swedish National Inpatient Register. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance (general cognitive ability, verbal, spatial/fluid, memory, and processing speed) from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between cognitive performance and hospitalization including spline models to analyse cognitive trajectories pre- and post-hospitalization.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 735 persons (89%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. Mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (±9.3)years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in general ability, processing speed and spatial/fluid ability compared with those who were not hospitalized. The two-slope models revealed steeper cognitive decline before hospitalization than after among those with at least one hospitalization event, as compared to non-hospitalized persons who showed steeper cognitive decline after the centering age of 70 years.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Persons being hospitalized in late life have lower cognitive performance across all assessed domains. The results indicate that the main decline occurs before the hospitalization, and not after. This might indicate that when you get treatment you also benefit cognitively.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-09 00:00
  • 46.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Finkel, Deborah G.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Trajectories of motor function and cognition in relation to hospitalization2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hospitalization among older people is common and associated with adverse outcomes. However, knowledge about long-term effects on motor functions and cognitive abilities in relation to hospitalization is scarce. In order to explore development of motor functions and cognition after hospitalization, a longitudinal study among middle-aged and older adults with up to 25 years of follow-up was conducted.

    Methods: Overall, 828 participants from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to the Swedish National Inpatient Register, which contains information on participants’ hospital admissions. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance and 7 assessments of motor functions i.e. fine motor, balance/upper strength, and flexibility, from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between hospitalization and subsequent motor function and cognitive performance.

    Results: A total of 735 (89 %) persons had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. The mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (± 9.3) years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in all domains and in motor functions compared with those who were not hospitalized. A significantly steeper decline was observed in motor function abilities as well as in processing speed, spatial/fluid, and general cognitive ability performance of hospitalized participants. These patterns remained even after comorbidities and dementia prevalence were controlled for.

    Discussion: We are the first to show that hospitalization is associated with steeper decline in both motor function and cognitive abilities across more than two decades of post-hospitalization follow-up.

  • 47.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Riverside, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Factors associated with hospitalization risk among community living middle aged and older persons: results from the Swedish Adoption/TwinStudy of Aging (SATSA)2016In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 66, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) describe and compare individual characteristics of hospitalized and not hospitalized community living persons, and (2) to determine factors that are associated with hospitalization risk over time. We conducted a prospective study with a multifactorial approach based on the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). A total of 772 Swedes (mean age at baseline 69.7 years, range 46–103, 59.8% females) answered a postal questionnaire about physical and psychological health, personality and socioeconomic factors. During nine years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations and associated diagnoses were obtained from national registers. Results show that 484 persons (63%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up period. The most common causes of admission were cardiovascular diseases (25%) and tumors (22%). Cox proportional hazard regression models controlling for age, sex and dependency within twin pairs, showed that higher age (HR = 1.02, p < 0.001) and more support from relatives (HR = 1.09, p = 0.028) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization, while marital status (unmarried (HR = 0.75, p = 0.033) and widow/widower (HR = 0.69, p < 0.001)) and support from friends (HR = 0.93, p = 0.029) were associated with lower risk of hospitalization. Social factors were important for hospitalization risk even when medical factors were controlled for in the analyses. Number of diseases was not a risk in the final regression model. Hospitalization risk was also different for women and men and within different age groups. We believe that these results might be used in future interventions targeting health care utilization.

  • 48.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Reynolds, C. A.
    University of California, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahl, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Inst Gerontol, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Factors associated with hospitalization among older people in Sweden: Results from the Satsa Study2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 678-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hospitalization among older people is common and associated with risk of adverse outcomes such as iatrogenic disorders and physical impairments. Knowledge about personal characteristics and social factors related to hospitalization is scarce. In order to understand which factors that are related to hospitalization risk, a prospective study with a multifactorial approach was conducted.

    Methods: In 2003, 794 Swedish persons (mean age 70.1 years, 60.7% females) answered a postal questionnaire as a part of the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). Participants were asked about physiological and psychological health, personality and socio economic factors. During seven years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations and the associated diagnoses were obtained from the Swedish National Inpatient Register.

    Results: Preliminary results show that 484 persons (61.0%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up period. The most common causes of admission were cardiovascular diseases and tumors. Cox proportional hazard regression model controlling for age, sex and dependency within twin pairs, showed that higher locus of control (HR=0.89, 95% CI=0.83-0.96), marital status (widow/widower (HR=0.64, 95 % CI=0.50-0.81) and unmarried (HR=0.67, 95% CI=0.50-0.90)), and support from friends (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99) were associated with lower risk of hospitalization, while greater numbers of diseases (HR=1.11, 95% CI=1.03-1.20) and negative life events (HR=1.16, 95%  CI=1.00-1.34) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization.

    Discussion: Our results show that both personal and social factors were important for the risk of hospitalization. This might be used in future interventions for understanding health care utilization.

  • 49. Hassing, Linda B
    et al.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Reynolds, Chandra
    Margrete, Gatz
    Johansson, Boo
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Overweight in midlife is related to lower cognitive function later in life2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the long-term effects of midlife overweight for cognitive abilities. The evidence is growing strong that overweight in midlife is related to increased dementia risk. Few studies have addressed the question if overweight affects cognitive abilities among those who do not develop dementia. In two studies we examined cognitive performance in two cohorts of people (young-old and old) in relation to self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI) in midlife. Methods: The participants are from the Swedish Twin Registry who participated in longitudinal studies on aging and cognition, the SATSA study (young-old cohort, 50 years and older) and the OCTO-Twin study (old cohort, 80 years and older) . BMI was reported in 1963 and cognitive abilities were examined 20- to 30-years later with five measurement occasions at 3-year intervals (SATSA) respectively 2-year intervals (OCTO-Twin). The cognitive abilities examined included tests of long-term memory, short-term memory, speed, verbal ability, spatial ability and a composite score representing general cognitive ability. Results: Multilevel modeling adjusting for twinship, demographic factors, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes, showed that higher BMI in midlife predicted lower test performance 30 years later. Significant associations were found in all cognitive abilities. Although we found a significant cognitive decline across the five measurement occassions in both cohorts at the follow-up assessments, a higher midlife BMI was not associated with steeper decline in the old cohort, with the exception of verbal ability. This was, however, found for a measure of general cognitive ability and spatial ability in the young-old cohort.Conclusions: Our results indicate that midlife overweight is related to lower overall cognitive function in old age. The fact that BMI-related effects in slopes were only noted in some abilities in the young-old cohort suggests that the negative effect of overweight has an early onset.

  • 50. Heikkila, Katriina
    et al.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    de Vroome, Ernest
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bjorner, Jacob J.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Burr, Hermann
    Erbel, Raimund
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Geuskens, Goedele A.
    Hooftman, Wendela E.
    Houtman, Irene L.
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Knutsson, Anders
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Nordin, Maria
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    Theorell, Töres
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Dragano, Nico
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Batty, G. David
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Long working hours and cancer risk: a multi-cohort study2016In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 114, p. 813-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear.

    METHODS: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk in 116 462 men and women who were free of cancer at baseline. Incident cancers were ascertained from national cancer, hospitalisation and death registers; weekly working hours were self-reported.

    RESULTS: During median follow-up of 10.8 years, 4371 participants developed cancer (n colorectal cancer: 393; n lung cancer: 247; n breast cancer: 833; and n prostate cancer: 534). We found no clear evidence for an association between working hours and the overall cancer risk. Working hours were also unrelated the risk of incident colorectal, lung or prostate cancers. Working ⩾55 h per week was associated with 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval 1.12-2.29) increase in female breast cancer risk independently of age, socioeconomic position, shift- and night-time work and lifestyle factors, but this observation may have been influenced by residual confounding from parity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that working long hours is unrelated to the overall cancer risk or the risk of lung, colorectal or prostate cancers. The observed association with breast cancer would warrant further research.

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