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  • 1.
    Bielsten, Therese
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Controlling the Uncontrollable: Patient Safety and Medication Management From the Perspective of Registered Nurses in Municipal Home Health Care2022In: Global Qualitative Nursing Research, E-ISSN 2333-3936, Vol. 9, article id 23333936221108700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most adverse events in health care are related to medication management and they are almost always preventable. Increased knowledge of patient safety related to medication management in home health care is an urgent issue to provide safe care for all patients regardless of where the health care takes place. This study explored patient safety within medication management in municipal home health care. Vignettes were used as stimulus during qualitative interviews with registered nurses. Three main themes with related subthemes were identified as challenges to patient safety within medication management in home health care: (1) challenges to information transfer, (2) challenges related to delegation, and (3) challenges of advanced medical treatments in the home. The issue of transfer of information permeated our findings. Coordinating medications, delegating tasks, along with more advanced care require clear communication between care providers to be compatible with patient safety within medication management in home health care.

  • 2.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, S.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Hellström, A.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Sandlund, C.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ulander, M.
    Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lind, J.
    Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Validation of two brief instruments (the SURE and CollaboRATE) to measure shared decision-making in patients with restless legs syndrome2023In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder characterised by an urge to move arms and legs, usually associated with discomfort, pain, motor restlessness, and sleep disturbance. An individually adapted treatment is needed but difficult to optimise, which makes shared decision-making (SDM) important. However, brief validated instruments on how patients with RLS perceive their involvement in treatment decisions are lacking. Therefore, the aim was to validate two instruments, SURE (Sure of myself, Understand information, Risk–benefit ratio, Encouragement, i.e., to assess decisional conflict) and CollaboRATE (brief patient survey focused on SDM, i.e., to assess SDM), in patients with RLS. A cross-sectional design, including 788 participants with RLS (65% females, mean [SD] age 70.8 [11.4] years) from a national patient organisation for RLS, was used. A postal survey was sent out to collect data regarding weight, height, comorbidities, demographics, and RLS-related treatment data. The following instruments were included: the SURE, CollaboRATE, Restless Legs Syndrome-6 Scale, and eHealth Literacy Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch models were used to assess the validity and reliability of the SURE and CollaboRATE. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning (DIF) across age, gender, and medication groups were assessed. The SURE and CollaboRATE were both identified as unidimensional instruments with satisfactory internal consistency. No DIF across age and gender was identified, while significant DIF was observed for both the SURE and CollaboRATE regarding medication use categories. However, both the SURE and CollaboRATE are potential instruments to be used in research, but also as reflection tools by healthcare professionals, patients, and students to explore and assess SDM, and support its development in clinical care.

  • 3.
    Bouwmeester Stjernetun, Björn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    ”It´s like walking in a bubble”, nursing students´ perspectives on age suit simulation in a home environment – group interviews from reflection seminars2024In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 23, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older persons with age-related and complex health problems will increasingly depend on care provision from nurses in their own homes. However, a barrier to quality care is ageism and nursing students´ disinterest in geriatrics. In addition, nurse education often falls short in preparing students for the complexity of geriatric care. Welfare technology (WT) is progressively implemented in home care to help older persons live at home despite their health problems. However, this process is intricate and requires acceptance and digital literacy among caregivers and older persons. Despite these challenges, nurse education can address and change negative attitudes through innovative teaching methods such as age suit simulation. Therefore, the study aims to describe nursing students´ experiences of age suit simulation in a home-like environment with WT and technical aids, and will reveal their perspective on ageing and providing care to older adults.

  • 4.
    Campbell, Sarah
    et al.
    Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK.
    Clark, Andrew
    University of Salford, Salford, UK.
    Keady, John
    University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Manji, Kainde
    Age Scotland, Scotland, UK.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Ward, Richard
    University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    'I can see what's going on without being nosey…': What matters to people living with dementia about home as revealed through visual home tours.2023In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 38, no 9, article id e5999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This paper considers home from the perspective of people living with dementia supporting ongoing discourse around ageing in place and the significance of creating more inclusive communities.

    METHODS: Forty-six home tour interviews led by people living with dementia were conducted in England and Scotland to better understand the connectivity between home and neighbourhood for people living with dementia. These interviews used a range of participatory and creative approaches including video, photographic images and in situ interviews. Data were analysed via reflexive thematic analysis.

    RESULTS: Three themes were identified in data analysis. 1. Connected home and neighbourhood, where participants revealed the dynamic relationship between home and neighbourhood; 2. Practices of home, where participants discussed the everyday nature of their homes and routines; and 3. Displaying home and family, which reflected participant's biographical homes in the context of living with dementia.

    DISCUSSION: The findings show that home holds multiple meanings for people living with dementia. For example, home is understood as a part of the neighbourhood and an extension of the home space into gardens and backyards, thus extending existing discourses that solely focus on the inside of people's homes. For people living with dementia, homes are also sites of negotiation and renegotiation where new meanings are created to reflect the changing nature and context of the home. There is not one fixed solution to these issues. Support and understanding for people living with dementia will need to evolve to adapt to the shifting dynamics and multiple meanings of home.

  • 5.
    Clark, Andrew
    et al.
    University of Salford, UK.
    Campbell, Sarah
    Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Keady, John
    University of Manchester, UK; Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Manji, Kainde
    About Dementia, Age Scotland's National Forum for Policy and Practice for People Living with Dementia.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Rummery, Kirstein
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Ward, Richard
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Understanding the meaning of neighbourhoods for people living with dementia: the value of a relational lens2021In: Dementia and Place: Practices, Experiences and Connections / [ed] R. Ward, A. Clark & L. Phillipson, Bristol: Policy Press, 2021, p. 23-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ekdahl, A. W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Living Unnoticed: Cognitive Impairment In Older People With Multimorbidity2016In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 275-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the correlation between MMSE ≤ 23 and the presence of a diagnosis of dementia in the medical record in a population with multimorbidity.

    Design, setting, and participants: This cross-sectional study was part of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment - a Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT; N = 382). Participants were community dwelling, aged ≥ 75 years, had received inpatient hospital care at least three times during the past 12 months, and had three or more concomitant diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision.

    Measurements: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was administered at baseline. Medical records of participants with MMSE scores < 24 were examined for the presence of dementia diagnoses and two years ahead.

    Results: Fifty-three (16%) of 337 participants with a measure of MMSE had a MMSE scores < 24. Six of these 53 (11%) participants had diagnoses of dementia (vascular dementia, n = 4; unspecified dementia, n = 1; Alzheimers disease, n = 1) according to medical records; 89% did not.

    Conclusions: A MMSE-score < 24 is not well correlated to a diagnosis of dementia in the medical record in a population of elderly with multimorbidity. This could imply that cognitive decline and the diagnosis of dementia remain undetected in older people with multimorbidity. Proactive care of older people with multimorbidity should focus on cognitive decline to detect cognitive impairment and to provide necessary help and support to this very vulnerable group.

  • 7.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Linköpings universitet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Linköpings universitet.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Praktisk brukarmedverkan – exemplet demensvänligt Norrköping2021In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 1, p. 64-67Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ingress: Liten uppmärksamhet inom forskning har hittills inriktats mot de erfarenheter, kunskaper och strategier som personer som lever med demens själva har utvecklat.

  • 8.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Walking interviews as a research method with people living with dementia in their local community2018In: Social research methods in dementia studies: inclusion and innovation / [ed] John Keady, Lars-Christer Hydén, Ann Johnson, Caroline Swarbrick, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 23-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Malm, Johannes
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Studies on Integrated Health and Welfare (SIHW).
    Bielsten, Therese
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Studies on Integrated Health and Welfare (SIHW).
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Nilsen, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Studies on Integrated Health and Welfare (SIHW).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Studies on Integrated Health and Welfare (SIHW). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare , Jönköping, Jonkopings Lan , Sweden.
    Co-production to tailor a digital tool for monitoring symptoms of dementia in nursing home care in Sweden2023In: Innovation in Aging, E-ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 7, no Supplement 1, p. 743-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of dementia change over time, resulting in complex situations that can negatively impact the person with dementia, as well as their relatives, and create challenges for staff members. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), such as delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression, anxiety, apathy, irritability, aberrant motor behavior, and sleep disturbances, occur in approximately 90% of older people with dementia. The purpose of the study was to identify potential barriers and facilitators prior to introducing a web-based digital tool, the Daily-BPSD. Daily-BPSD is going to be used by staff members for daily registrations of severity levels of BPSD for persons with dementia in nursing home care in Sweden. Qualitative data collection was conducted in co-production with previous users of a similar digital tool in disability care (n = 11) and future users in dementia care (n = 32). The participants were assistant nurses, care managers, nurses, occupational therapists, and relatives. The responses highlight the importance of an accessible and time-effective registration procedure, a manageable number of variables and registrations occasions per day, and ensuring that the same information does not need to be documented in different systems. The findings will be used to tailor Daily-BPSD and adequately prepare staff members for large-scale data collection in the next step of the research project. Daily-BPSD could provide an extended foundation of knowledge of the person with BPSD, which could be used to provide more person-centered and appropriate care.

  • 10.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Sharing and acknowledging snapshots of everyday citizenship: Experiences from a Swedish dementia-friendly initiative in Norrköping municipality2019In: Everyday citizenship and people with dementia / [ed] A.-C. Nedlund, R. Bartlett & C. L. Clarke, Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2019, p. 31-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Neighbourhood nursing: connection, place and meaning in the everyday experience of dementia2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent policy is marked by a shift towards enabling people with dementia to remain at home and in their neighbourhoods, yet little is known about the wider perspective of neighbourhood as an everyday place of connection, practice and meaning in the lives of people with experience of dementia.  

    Aims: The aim of this thesis is twofold. The first aim is to explore the neighbourhood as an everyday place for people with experiences of dementia. The second aim is to explore neighbourhood as a place for practice.  

    Methods and Designs: Five studies are included in the thesis with both quantitative and qualitative designs. Study I had a cross-sectional exploratory and descriptive design. A total cohort of 17, 405 people with a dementia diagnosis were identified and matched with data about home care services and housing, and were then associated with socio-demographic factors in three county councils: Östergötland, Stockholm and Västerbotten. Study II had a phenomenological design; 14 community-dwelling people diagnosed with dementia in the County of Östergötland participated using walking interviews. Study III had an inductive and exploratory qualitative design including 14 community-dwelling people living alone with dementia in England, Scotland and Sweden involving multiple data collection methods. Study IV had an inductive and explorative qualitative design that included 22 people with the lived, personal and professional experiences of dementia and used semi-structured individual and group interviews. Study V had an inductive and explorative qualitative design where the perspectives of 18 participants (registered and specialist nurses) were included using shadowing as the main method for data collection.  

    Findings: In study I, 72% of the cohort was living in ordinary housing and 28% in special housing of the total of 17, 405 people with a dementia diagnosis. Overall, 52% of 17, 405 people with dementia in three county councils (Östergötland, Stockholm and Västerbotten) were living alone. Study II revealed that walking in the neighbourhood was an integral part of their day-to-day activities that helped them to manage life with dementia. Connection to nature by being outdoors was a restorative practice for people living with dementia. Neighbourhood was often described as a social context, although some participants living alone revealed that their social contacts were mainly staff working in municipal home care. In study III, participants across all three field sites channelled their efforts to stay connected to the neighbourhood into creating new ways of maintaining social networks and relationships. By participating in several activities (provided in the United Kingdom by the third-sector and charitable groups, and in Sweden, by the municipalities), bonds of friendship were created. However, the impact of stigma surrounding dementia was highlighted by the participants, which caused experiences of involuntary solitude or loneliness. Despite the impact of stigma, participants took control over their lives by searching for new daily social connections in the neighbourhood and were by no means passive in the face of the challenges in everyday life. In study IV, the participants discussed how dementia was stigmatized in the community. People  living with dementia were often not being respected as active citizens with their own resources in the community. Being socially active in a group or in public spaces were strategies to maintain a social role in the community. Participants with different experiences of dementia wanted the day care centres and teams to be more centrally involved in person-centred care and health-promoting improvements. Finally, in study V, participants struggled with the commonly held view of their role and their workplace within the health care system, interpreting it as being invisible, as if placed in a black box. The tasks and responsibilities of the participants were shifting to assistant nurses, neighbours and family members according to the socio-economic level of the municipality. Nonetheless, the participants were clearly part of the neighbourhood. The findings of this thesis have been integrated into a combined thematic analysis based on the five studies to reach an overall representation of people’s experiences of neighbourhood as an everyday place and a place for practice in the context of dementia. Five main themes (and three sub-themes) emerged from the analysis: (1) walkable attachment to the lived neighbourhood; (2) daily activities promote health and well-being; (3) opportunities for social connections; (4) just treat us as active citizens; (5) neighbourhood: a place for practice. The analysis suggested the neighbourhood was not only described as a walkable, social and citizenship arena in the context of dementia; it was also a place where practice was ongoing around the clock (studies II, III, IV and V) because most of the people with dementia are living in ordinary housing (study I).  

    Conclusion: The thesis presents a new foundation and knowledge to understand neighbourhood as a place for everyday life and practice by applying a new lens for understanding. The neighbourhood can be understood as a place linked by connections that people actively searched out, and where the meaning of place emerges via movement of the body through the world. It is also a site where practices support everyday life for people with dementia, especially for those living alone with dementia. This points to the need to re-think nursing practice, where “neighbourhood nursing” as a formal model with a lifeworld perspective has to be established in dialogue with citizens.

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  • 12.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Division of Nursing Science and Reproductive Health, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden; Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    Division of Society and Health, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Division of Society and Health, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Health promotion initiative: A dementia-friendly local community in Sweden2021In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1971-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a great public health concern worldwide. Despite this, little is known from a health-promoting perspective about dementia in general as a public health issue, in dialog with people living with dementia, applicable at individual, group, and societal levels with regard to policies and practice. This study therefore aims to explore the experiences related to living with dementia in the local community by advancing a health-promoting perspective. Semi-structured individual and group interviews were conducted with participants (n = 22) with lived, professional, and personal experiences of dementia living in a medium-sized municipality in Sweden. Transcripts were analyzed by thematic analysis. Four themes emerged: health promotion through knowledge and public awareness, health promotion through opportunities to be active, health promotion through meaningful meeting places, and health promotion through improvements in the welfare system. We found that more knowledge and public awareness about dementia are needed to advance a health-promoting perspective and increase the prominence of dementia as a public health issue. Further research and policy need to focus more on how professionals in dementia care practice could be involved in promoting health and well-being for people with dementia.

  • 13.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Ward, Richard
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, UK.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    'Overjoyed that I can go outside': Using walking interviews to learn about the lived experience and meaning of neighbourhood for people living with dementia2020In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 2199-2219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationships between people living with dementia and their neighbourhood as they venture out from home on a regular and often routine basis. Here, we report findings from the Swedish field site of an international 5-year project: Neighbourhoods: our people, our places. The aims of this study were to investigate the lived experience of the neighbourhood for people with dementia and through this to better understand the meaning that neighbourhood held for the participants. In this study, we focus on the walking interviews which were conducted with 14 community-dwelling people with dementia (11 men and 3 women) and were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological method. Four themes were revealed from these interviews: life narratives embedded within neighbourhood; the support of selfhood and wellbeing through movement; the neighbourhood as an immediate social context; and restorative connections to nature. These themes were distilled into the 'essence' of what neighbourhood meant for the people we interviewed: A walkable area of subjective significance and social opportunity in which to move freely and feel rejuvenated. We have found that the neighbourhood for community-dwelling people with dementia holds a sense of attachment and offers the potential for freedom of movement. Our research indicates that a dementia diagnosis doesn't necessarily reduce this freedom of movement. The implications for practice and policy are considered: future research should explore and pay closer attention to the diverse living conditions of people living with dementia, and not least the particular challenges faced by people living alone with dementia.

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  • 14.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thaper-Björkert, Suruchi
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Discussing racism in healthcare: A qualitative study of reflections by graduate nursing students2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 3677-3686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim is to illustrate and analyse reflections from graduate nursing students over their experience of discussing racism in healthcare in an educational intervention.

    Design: A qualitative, descriptive design was adopted.

    Methods: Data were collected through written reflections and analysed through content analysis. In total, 81 students participated in the intervention; 39 paediatric and 42 public health care nursing students. Of those, 27 participants gave consent to have their written reflections included in the study.

    Results: Three main categories were developed in the content analysis of student reflections: (a) the implicit embeddedness of racism in healthcare organization; (b) the effect of racism on interactions with patients; and (c) a growing awareness of one's own understanding of racism. This study indicates that student nurses discussed racism as relevant to understanding good clinical practice for the benefit of patients and work-based wellbeing of staff. This recognition of the organizational nature of racism warrants nursing leaders and managers to include racism as a social determinant of health in the undergraduate and graduate curricula to educate the next generation of nursing about racism.

  • 15.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Hyden, Lars-Christer
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen Åldrande och social förändring.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    People diagnosed with dementia in Sweden: What type of home care services and housing are they granted? A cross-sectional study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study aims to examine what types of home care services and housing are granted to people with a dementia diagnosis and how these types are associated with socio-demographic factors (sex, age, marital status, native or foreign born, and regional area).

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study of all people diagnosed with dementia in three Swedish counties was conducted from the medical records in 2012. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to investigate associations between home care services and housing and socio-demographic variables.

    RESULTS: In total, 17,405 people had a dementia diagnosis, and the majority were women, aged 80+ years, and unmarried. Some 72% were living in ordinary housing and 28% lived in special housing. Of those who lived in ordinary housing, 50% did not receive any home care service. Not receiving any type of home care services was less common for older people and was also associated with being married and living in rural municipalities. The most common home care services granted were home help and personal care. Special housing was more common for older people, unmarried persons, and those living in rural municipalities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most people with a dementia diagnosis were living in ordinary housing, and, surprisingly, half of those did not receive any type of home care service. This knowledge is essential for making the living conditions and needs of people living with dementia more visible and to provide good home care services for people with dementia and their families.

  • 16.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV).
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Boendemiljö och grannskap2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 87-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Andrew, Clark
    School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford, UK.
    Sarah, Campbell
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Kainde, Manji
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Kirstein, Rummery
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    John, Keady
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Richard, Ward
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    ‘It's our pleasure, we count cars here’: an exploration of the ‘neighbourhood-based connections’ for people living alone with dementia2021In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 645-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of social isolation experienced by people living with dementia who reside in the community has been well acknowledged, yet little is known about how people living alone with dementia maintain neighbourhood-based connections. The purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of people with dementia who live alone, focusing upon how they establish social networks and relationships in a neighbourhood context, and how they are supported to maintain this social context within everyday life. Multiple data collection methods were used including, semi-structured interviews, walking interviews, guided home tours and social network mapping, which were conducted with 14 community-dwelling people living alone with dementia (11 women and three men) situated across the three international study sites in England, Scotland and Sweden. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed four main themes: (a) making the effort to stay connected; (b) befriending by organisations and facilitated friendships; (c) the quiet neighbourhood atmosphere; and (d) changing social connections. The analysis suggests that people with dementia who live alone were active agents who took control to find and maintain relationships and social networks in the neighbourhood. Our findings indicate the need to raise awareness about this specific group in both policy and practice, and to find creative ways to help people connect through everyday activities and by spontaneous encounters in the neighbourhood.

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  • 18.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clark, Andrew
    University of Salford, UK.
    Campbell, Sarah
    Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Manji, Kainde
    About Dementia, Age Scotland's National Forum for Policy and Practice for People Living with Dementia.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Keady, John
    University of Manchester, UK; Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Ward, Richard
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Making and maintaining neighbourhood connections when living alone with dementia2021In: Dementia and Place: Practices, Experiences and Connections / [ed] R. Ward, A. Clark & L. Phillipson, Bristol: Policy Press, 2021, p. 67-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV).
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Citizenship and Social Inclusion for People with Dementia: A Register Study in a Swedish Context on the Distribution of Social - Care Services2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, every citizen has equal right to social-care. The purpose of this session is to investigate how social support is distributed for people with dementia and to compare this distribution in an ethnicity perspective. A statistical analysis will be presented based on data in progress.

  • 20.
    Ward, Richard
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Manji, Kainde
    Independent Researcher (previously), University of Stirling, UK.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Clark, Andrew
    School of Health and Society, University of Salford, UK.
    Campbell, Sarah
    Department of Social Care and Social Work, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Getting lost with dementia: Encounters with the time-space of not knowing2022In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 78, article id 102940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the experience and implications of getting lost with dementia. While getting lost has become culturally emblematic of dementia, speaking as it does to a widespread fear of losing our place in the world, it is marked by an overall absence of critical attention. We argue that this critical hesitancy is part of a broader unease with 'dementing' that reveals a paradox in dementia scholarship as growing emphasis on strengths-based and capacity-oriented approaches to the condition shift attention away from episodes of disorientation, forgetting and unknowing that commonly arise after onset. We therefore explore getting lost with dementia, not only as a route to better understanding what happens during such events and the meaning it holds but also to consider the implications for a broader politics of the social inclusion of people living with dementia. Reporting findings from a five-year international study of the neighbourhood experiences of people with dementia, we suggest that through such experiences as getting lost, people with dementia have a unique and distinctive contribution to make to the ever-evolving character of public space and civic culture. In particular, we argue that getting lost and the subsequent recovery or reconstitution that ensues can help inform efforts to reimagine public space. This includes looking beyond risk reduction in responses to dementia and public and outdoor settings to consider how freedom of movement for people with dementia might be enhanced rather than curtailed. Our learning points to the value of making the process of dementing more visible and central to the politics and practices of social inclusion.

  • 21.
    Ward, Richard
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Manji, Kainde
    About Dementia Project Manager, Age Scotland, Edinburgh, UK.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Keady, John
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Clark, Andrew
    School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford, UK.
    Campbell, Sarah
    Department of Social Care and Social Work, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK.
    Beyond the shrinking world: dementia, localisation and neighbourhood2022In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2892-2913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Dementia-friendly communities’ herald a shift toward the neighbourhood as a locus for the care and support of people with dementia, sparking growing interest in the geographies of dementia care and raising questions over the shifting spatial and social experience of the condition. Existing research claims that many people with dementia experience a ‘shrinking world’ whereby the boundaries to their social and physical worlds gradually constrict over time, leading to a loss of control and independence. This paper reports a five-year, international study that investigated the neighbourhood experience of people with dementia and those who care for and support them. We interrogate the notion of a shrinking world and in so doing highlight an absence of attention paid to the agency and actions of people with dementia themselves. The paper draws together a socio-relational and embodied-material approach to question the adequacy of the shrinking world concept as an explanatory framework and to challenge reliance within policy and practice upon notions of place as fixed or stable. We argue instead for the importance of foregrounding ‘lived place’ and attending to social practices and the networks in which such practices evolve. Our findings have implications for policy and practice, emphasising the need to bolster the agency of people living with dementia as a route to fostering accessible and inclusive neighbourhoods.

  • 22.
    Ward, Richard
    et al.
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Manji, Kainde
    About Dementia, Age Scotland's National Forum for Policy and Practice for People Living with Dementia.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Keady, John
    University of Manchester, UK; Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Clark, Andrew
    University of Salford, UK.
    Campbell, Sarah
    Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Enabling the neighbourhood: the case for rethinking dementia-friendly communities2021In: Dementia and Place: Practices, Experiences and Connections / [ed] R. Ward, A. Clark & L. Phillipson, Bristol: Policy Press, 2021, p. 94-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ward, Richard
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Manji, Kainde
    Independent Researcher (previously Faculty of Social Sciences University of Stirling), Stirling, Scotland.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Keady, John
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Clark, Andrew
    School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford, UK.
    Campbell, Sarah
    Department of Social Care and Social Work, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK.
    Taking time: The temporal politics of dementia, care and support in the neighbourhood2022In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1427-1444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a global health challenge and currently the focus of a coordinated international response articulated through the notion of 'dementia-friendly communities and initiatives' (DFCIs). Yet, while increasing research attention has been paid to the social and spatial dimensions to life with dementia in a neighbourhood setting, the temporalities of dementia have been largely overlooked. This article sets out different aspects of the lived experience of time for people with dementia and unpaid carers, before exploring the temporal politics of formal dementia care and support. The authors show that time is a site for material struggle and a marker of unequal relations of power. People with dementia and unpaid carers are disempowered through access to formal care, and this is illustrated in their loss of (temporal) autonomy and limited options for changing the conditions of the care received. The authors advocate for a time-space configured understanding of the relationship with neighbourhood and foreground a tempo-material understanding of dementia. Set against the backdrop of austerity policy in the UK, the findings reveal that ongoing budgetary restrictions have diminished the capacity for social care to mediate in questions of social justice and inequality, at times even compounding inequity.

1 - 23 of 23
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