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  • 1.
    Craig, Brett
    et al.
    COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance and Demand, World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Montpellier Advanced knowledge Institute on Transitions (MAKIT), Montpellier University; Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM), Malmö University.
    Jones, Lee
    Queen Mary University of London.
    The Role of Public Knowledge and Government Regulation in Achieving Good Healthcare2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public perceptions of health and medical advice remains a constant issue within attempts to both encourage sensible precautions to reduce the spread of Covid-19, as well as ensuring sufficient uptake of vaccinations. Yet, we haveseen examples of disinformation at the very highest levels of government, whether over the seriousness of the pandemic, or how to ensure optimal distribution of vaccinations. This session will discusses these issues with respect to the global situation, as well as drawing upon examples from a few key states, including the UK.

  • 2.
    Ferede, Meskerem Mitiku
    et al.
    Addis Ababa University.
    Bergström, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS).
    Tawat, Mahama
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS).
    Final evaluation: Executive Community Leadership Program, Annual Report 22/23 Appendix 42023Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Hellström,, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Tawat, Mahama
    Public Policy and Administration in the Department of Sociology and Research Associate at the Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Trouble in the homeland: How cultural identity and welfare politics merge in contemporary Danish and Swedish politics2020In: Nostalgia and hope: Intersections between politics of culture, welfare, and migration in Europe / [ed] O. C. Norocel, A. Hellström & M. B. Jørgensen, Cham: Springer, 2020, p. 19-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines differences in the discourses on migration from two socio-economically similar countries—Denmark and Sweden. It employs the notion of conventional discourse to show how cultural identity and welfare politics intersect in the policy debates and blogospheres of the two countries. It also shows that a discursive shift had already occurred in the mainstream political discourse in Denmark before the 2015 refugee crisis—a discourse in which the dominant view is that cultural diversity is incompatible with social cohesion and thus a perceived threat to the welfare system. The same line of thinking is prevalent in Denmark’s blogosphere. In contrast, Sweden’s cultural issues have been consistently associated with redistributive policies in the mainstream political discourse, and these vary along the Left versus Right ideological cleavage. However, in Sweden’s blogosphere, welfare chauvinism and opposition to multiculturalism appear to be equally as strong as in Denmark.

  • 4. Tawat, Mahama
    A Guerra da Ucrânia, as Nações Unidas e o Sul Global2022In: Linha Vermelha - A Guerra da Ucrânia e as RIs no século XXI / [ed] Felipe Loureiro, Editora da Unicamp , 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Montpellier Advanced Knowledge Institute on Transitions; Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University.
    A lot of people are saying: The new conspiracism and the assault on democracy. Nancy Rosenblum and Russell Muirhead (eds). Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2019. 232 pp. $26.95 (cloth)2022In: Governance. An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, ISSN 0952-1895, E-ISSN 1468-0491, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 335-336Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Institute for Research, Socio-Economic Development and Communication (IRESCO) of Cameroun.
    Building tomorrow's intelligence together2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the stakes and modalities of a research-based development focused on strengthening African scientific communities?

    The emergence of global issues that concern both the ‘Global South’ and the ‘Global North’ invites us to go beyond the idea of development as simply catching-up technically to improve economic growth. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development bear witness to this. In this context, science’s role and expectations are changing significantly. More than ever, the scientific communities are being called upon to do more than just contribute to immediate technical solutions; they are invited, and sometimes invite themselves, to act in conjunction with development actors to shed light on the complex processes underway, to formulate and address the issues that will arise in the future, to experiment with new policy paths as well as to identify possible blockages. The ambition of a research-based development relies on the conviction that the transfer of knowledge from the best laboratories in the world is insufficient and that the society itself must participate in knowledge production in order to imagine and build its future. Such a position calls for the strengthening of the capacities of scientific institutions in all countries, so that they are fully involved in international initiatives and able to better contribute to the challenges that their countries are facing.

    Montpellier’s scientific communities, grouped together in the ‘Montpellier University of Excellence’ initiative around the three challenges ‘Feed – Protect – Care’, place special emphasis on the partnership with Africa, based on a long tradition of hospitality, exchanges and cooperation. This virtual roundtable will highlight some of these partnerships and focus on the challenges of strengthening African scientific communities for the joint construction of tomorrow’s intelligence and world. Several Q&A sessions with the webinar participants will be organised.

  • 7.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow, Russia.
    Controlling immigration: A global perspective. James Hollifield, Philip Martin and Pia Orrenius, eds. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 2014. 512 pp. $29.95 (paper)2017In: Governance. An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, ISSN 0952-1895, E-ISSN 1468-0491, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 162-163Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Tawat, Mahama
    University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Danish and Swedish immigrants’ cultural policies between 1960 and 2006: toleration and the celebration of difference2014In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 202-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1960s, as non-Nordic immigrants became an important component of their immigration flows, despite their similar policy backgrounds Sweden opted for multiculturalism, while Denmark did not. Their policies diverged even further from the so-called migration crisis of the 1990s. This article compares and analyses Sweden and Denmark’s respective policies between 1960 and 2006, arguing that their policies effectively diverged in the late 1960s; Danish assimilation is constituted of the toleration or acceptance, albeit disapproving, of immigrants’ cultures. Swedish multiculturalism, by way of contrast, celebrates difference, holding that immigrants’ cultures are necessary for their well-being and that ethnocultural diversity enriches the national culture. However, both policies deemed some aspects of immigrants’ cultures unacceptable, in that they were looked upon as illiberal or repugnant. This study also contends that, alongside citizenship and national identity studies, Ministries of Culture’s policies are a relevant field of enquiry into states’ policies on immigrants’ cultures.

  • 9.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS). Malmö Institute for studies of Multiculturalism, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University; Institute for Socioeconomic Research and Communication; Université Montpellier I.
    Fake News and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: A Study of Practices and Sociopolitical Implications in Cameroon2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a heavy death toll, weakens health systems and devastates economies, the discovery and delivery of vaccines have rekindled hope. However, fake news has emerged as a serious obstacle to countries’ vaccination campaigns. Taking Cameroon as a case study, this article investigates the practices (types and contents) and sociopolitical implications at micro and macro levels of fake news on COVID-19 vaccines and vaccination campaign. It shows that vaccine hesitancy is mostly linked to conspiracy theories. Vaccine complacency, the first component of vaccine hesitancy, mainly relates to conspiracy theories about foreign extermination/experimentation plots. Vaccine confidence, the second component of vaccine hesitancy mostly correlates with conspiracy theories alleging the complicity of local authorities in these plots. Vaccine confidence, the third component of vaccine hesitancy, is linked to disinformation notably about acts of corruption. These translate into claims of alternative truth, infodemic, nationalism and distrust of elites at individual level, and the rise of vaccine hesitancy, the delegitimization of public institutions and claims of alternative truth at societal level. The phenomenon occurs in fairly similar ways as in the West but there are marked thematic differences. The article provides policy recommendations on the scientific, communication, and sociopolitical planes.

  • 10.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS).
    Fake news et défiance vis-à-vis des vaccins au Cameroun. Le récit d'une enquête netnographique2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Centre for Advanced Studies of the Higher School of Economics, Moscow; Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University, Sweden.
    Frontiers of Fear: Immigration and Insecurity in the United States and Europe. Ariane Chebel d'Appolonia. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012. 305 pp. $87.95 (cloth). Survival Migration: Failed Governance and the Crisis of Displacements. Alexander Betts. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2013. 256 pp. $77.95 (cloth)2016In: Governance. An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, ISSN 0952-1895, E-ISSN 1468-0491, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 433-446Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS). Université de Montpellier.
    How the migration and mobility pact has helped to reset AU-EU relations2022In: The Conversation, E-ISSN 2201-5639Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS). Université de Montpellier.
    La guerre Russie-Ukraine: décryptage du vote des pays africains à l’ONU2022In: The Conversation, E-ISSN 2201-5639Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö Institute for the Study of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University, Sweden.
    Multiculturalism: Is Denmark a den of intolerance and Sweden a land of political correctness? [blog post]2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Introductory paragraph: The recent ban on the wearing of full-face veils in Denmark is evidence of that country’s unease with multiculturalism, a feeling shared by some other European nations who have adopted similar legislation. Sweden, meanwhile, has largely stayed true to its policy of multiculturalism. Mahama Tawat compares Danish and Swedish policies towards immigrant communities, tracing the clear difference between the two that has emerged over time while also sounding a note of caution against exaggerating the difference.

  • 15.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; European Centre for Minority Issues, Flensburg, Germany.
    New Public Management in New Zealand: The past, present and future2014In: International Public Management Review, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost three decades ago, the world of Public Policy and Administration (PPA) was rocked by New Public Management (NPM), a liberal gospel advocating the application of business administration models to the management of public services in lieu of the old ‘monolithic” and hierarchical neo-weberian ideal type. But nowhere than in the “Land of the Long White Cloud”, did NPM find a more fertile ground (Pollitt and Bouckaert 2004, Ryan and Gill 2011: 306). To quote Evert Lindquist, while the UK only took new “steps” and the US set on “re-inventing” its machinery of government, New Zealand launched a “revolution” (2011: pp. 46-84). Praised and flaunted around the world by the Bretton Woods Institutions, the country became known as the “Land of New Public Management” and Wellington, its capital, a site of pilgrimage for government practitioners seeking advice (Schick 1998: 123).

    Since then, to paraphrase Castles et al., the “Great Experiment” has continued to fascinate. But while we know the fine grain of this “bureaucratic phenomenon”, its broader picture especially after the mid-1990s is still unclear. In the words of Berman, “Generalizable links among their findings remain sparse and thin” (2001: 231). This review article attempts to connect the dots by analyzing four books that offer an in-depth account of the reform program but were published at different time-distances.

    The first, Public Management: The New Zealand Model dates from 1996, shortly after the virtual end of the experiment and was written by a team of academics led by Jonathan Boston, a keen observer of public policy in New Zealand. The second, Remaking New Zealand and Australian Economic Policy by Shaun Goldfinch, another academic was published in 2000 and is cast in a comparative perspective. The third, Public Management in New Zealand: Lessons and Challenges was published in 2001 by an insider, Graham Scott, the Secretary General of the powerful New Zealand Treasury from 1986 to 1993. The fourth, Future State, Directions for Public Management in New Zealand was published in 2011 and co-edited by Bill Ryan and Derek Gill. It recoups ideas from academics and policy practitioners who were asked by the State Services Commission, a public service watchdog to conceptualize the future state in a context marked by financial cuts, demands for more democratic accountability and complex challenges.

    The books are reviewed along four dimensions: policy change, policy content, policy outcomes and future trends. Relevant questions are: Where did the reforms originate? What are their characteristics (defining and secondary)? How successful was the model? What is its current state and the path laying ahead? The books are cross-referred and where necessary supplemented by additional literature.

  • 16.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS). Université de Montpellier.
    Russia-Ukraine war: Decoding how African countries voted at the UN2022In: The Conversation, E-ISSN 2201-5639Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    The 2015 EU-Africa Malta Agreement on Immigration: Ideas, Interests and Institutions2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; School of Sociology, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow, Russia.
    The birth of Sweden’s multicultural policy: The impact of Olof Palme and his ideas2019In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 471-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The breadth of Sweden’s multicultural policy has left it as one of the few truly multiculturalist countries in the West. This exceptionalism is puzzling and has generated a lot of attention from scholars and the public alike. Using a policy process perspective, this article traces its process of adoption in the 1970s. It shows that the adoption of an official multicultural policy relied crucially on Olof Palme and his ideas in his role as an ‘activist gatekeeper.’ The article takes as illustration the country’s first State Cultural Policy passed in 1974.

  • 19.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Higher School of Economics, Moscow.
    The Births of Danish and Swedish Cultural Integration Policies: Ideas from Policy Legacy in Denmark and Olof Palme in Sweden2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    The Divergent Convergence of Multiculturalism Policy in the Nordic Countries (1964 - 2006): Immigration Size, Policy Diffusion and Path Dependency2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic countries are among the main destinations for immigrants in the world because of their traditionally generous policies. They are also some of the most integrated and similar countries. Yet, in the 1970s when they became confronted with the “multicultural question”, they made different choices. This article shows that the presence or absence of a sizeable immigration was the main causal factor. It explains why Sweden adopted multiculturalism while Finland and Iceland did not. However, this factor was sufficient and not necessary. The formulation of multicultural policy provisions (MCPs) in Norway despite a small and late labour immigration was the result of diffusion from Sweden. In Denmark, the absence of sizeable immigration combined with the presence of a nationally-oriented policy legacy to further deny such outcome. There was an upward albeit slow convergence towards multiculturalism. Groupings of multiculturalist and assimilationist countries stuck together until the civic turn in the mid-2000s.

  • 21.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Centre of Advanced Studies, Higher School of Economics, Russia.
    The ethics of multiculturalism: A re-appraisal2016In: International perspectives of multiculturalism: The ethical challenges / [ed] O. D. Clennon, New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is much disagreement among scholars about the concepts of multiculturalism and assimilation. As a consequence, they are polysemic and in need of both differentiation and homogenisation. In this chapter, Mahama Tawat will seek to differentiate between the ethical considerations of Assimilation, Liberal Nationalism and Multiculturalism by examining the theoretical frameworks proposed by David Miller and the various readings of the 'Celebration of Difference' as advocated by Charles Taylor, Iris Marion Young and Bhikhu Parekh.

  • 22.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM); Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    The Tip of the Iceberg: Prop. 1975:26 and its Freedom of Choice Goal in Sweden’s Multiculturalism Policy2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the expansive literature on Swedish multiculturalism policy, the Freedom of Choice Goal (FCG) of the Bill, Prop. 1975:26, Guidelines for an Immigrant and Minority Policy is often presented as its founding document. But this belies the fact that the Goal was beset by a controversy about its multicultural scope in the years that followed its adoption in 1975 that was never really settled. This article revisits the question and shows that the Goal indeed represented a multicultural vision. However, it was just the tip of an iceberg formed by socioeconomic integration policies. Earlier and more consistent multicultural policy provisions were present most notably in the state cultural policy. The article draws evidence from multiple sources including comparison with Norway.

  • 23.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Towards an ever “closer” union?: Refugee Policy and Social Cohesion in Eastern EU Member States2016In: East European Politics, ISSN 2159-9165, E-ISSN 2159-9173, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 277-284Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introductory paragraph: In the grand chessboard of refugee politics that has spooked Western Europe since the first “migration crisis” broke out in the mid-1980s, a new opening has appeared with an ominious sign for the future of the Union. A schism has occurred between “old” and “new” Europe following the policy chaos that occurred with the mass arrival of Syrian refugees. On the one hand, Western EU (WEU)1 governments have been willing to welcome refugees as illustrated by Angela Merkel's unilateral decision to suspend the Dublin Regulation on the first country of entry and give blanket asylum to Syrian refugees. On the other hand, Eastern EU (EEU) leaders from the Baltic countries (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) and the Visegrád Group (Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia) have refused to receive these refugees. Hungary, for example, rushed to build a fence along its frontier with Serbia and at times blocked their onward travel to Austria and Germany. In 2014, while acceptance rates for refugees hovered around 77% in Sweden, they fell as low as 24% in Latvia (IRIN 2015). For countries that must equitably apply the same regulations, this gap is astonishing.

  • 24.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Higher School of Economics, Moscow.
    Two Tales of Viking Diversity: A Comparative Study of Denmark and Sweden’s Immigration Policies2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Tawat, Mahama
    University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Two tales of viking diversity: A comparative study of the immigrant integration policies of Denmark and Sweden, 1960-20062012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The perspective of this dissertation is a comparison between the integration policies of Denmark and Sweden between 1960, when there was a shift toward non-Nordic and non-European immigration, and 2006. The two countries’ policies continued to diverge in the cultural integration domain. In Denmark, ideas stemming from a policy legacy, and promoting the national culture, prevented multiculturalism from taking root. In Sweden, it was— above all—Olof Palme, the slain activist, in his capacity as Minister of Culture and Prime Minister, who engineered the advent of multiculturalism.

    Danish policy makers chose a policy of toleration. That is, the disapproval of immigrants’ cultural practices in the public sphere but the non-interference of the state in the private sphere as long as these practices did not harm the majority. In Sweden, the cultural embeddedness of immigrants was promoted until the mid-1990s. After that time ethnocultural diversity was portrayed as a source of cultural enrichment, a remedy against racism and xenophobia, and lastly as a means of taking advantage of globalization especially in economic terms.

    Their policies converged in the socioeconomic and political integration domains. Both states sought to maximize their interests by emphasizing employment and self-help among immigrants, but they continued to consolidate immigrants’ socioeconomic rights, mainly through anti-discrimination policies. Despite the fear of globalization, a rise in the number of refugees, and xenophobia from the 1990s onwards, all these policies were “locked” in their trajectories.

  • 26. Tawat, Mahama
    Understanding Convergence in Immigrant Integration Policies: The Cases of Denmark and Sweden Since 19602015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Would East Meet West? Refugee Policy in Eastern EU countries2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Tawat, Mahama
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Lamptey, Eileen
    Akrofi-Christaller Institute of Theology, Mission and Culture (ACI), Akropong-Akuapem, Ghana.
    The 2015 EU-Africa joint Valletta action plan on immigration: A parable of complex interdependence2022In: International migration (Geneva. Print), ISSN 0020-7985, E-ISSN 1468-2435, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 28-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2015, as the "refugee crisis" unfolded, the European Union negotiated deals respectively with Turkey and many African countries to stem the influx of asylum seekers. But little comparatively has been said about its African deal, the Joint Valletta Action Plan (JVAP) and its impact. Using migration policy theories, this article shows that the African deal, embodied in the concept of "shared responsibility," amounts to a special kind of interest, complex interdependence. Specifically, while parties held onto their interests (territorial integrity for the Europeans and economic development for the Africans), there was a new sense, especially on the part of the Europeans, that both parties needed each other's help (cooperation) to advance these interests. As a result, concrete measures such as the EU Emergency Trust Fund were formulated. Looking at their "effects," these measures have been positive in most policy domains.

1 - 28 of 28
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