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  • 1.
    de Almeida, Fernando J. M.
    et al.
    Tandvårdens Kompetenscentrum, Norrbotten Public Dental Service, Luleå, Sweden.
    Dawson, Victoria S.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kvist, Thomas
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Bjørndal, Lars
    Department of Cariology and Endodontics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Isberg, Per-Erik
    Department of Statistics, Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fransson, Helena
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jonasson, P.
    Markvart, M.
    Pigg, M.
    Wigsten, E.
    Periradicular surgery: A longitudinal registry study of 10-year outcomes and factors predictive of post-surgical extraction2023In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 1212-1221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This historical prospective cohort study of the adult population of Sweden is based on data from a national registry: the primary aim was to evaluate the long-term survival of teeth after periradicular surgery. A secondary aim was to identify factors predictive of extraction within 10 years of registration of periradicular surgery.

    Methodology: The cohort consisted of all individuals who had undergone periradicular surgery to treat apical periodontitis, as reported to the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) in 2009. The cohort was followed until 31 December 2020. Subsequent registrations of extractions were collected for Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and survival tables. The patients' sex, age, dental service provider and tooth group were also retrieved from SSIA. Only one tooth per individual was included in the analyses. Multivariable regression analysis was used and p <.05 was considered statistically significant. The reporting guidelines STROBE and PROBE were followed.

    Results: After data cleaning, and exclusion of 157 teeth, 5622 teeth/individuals remained for analysis. The mean age of the individuals at the time of the periradicular surgery was 60.5 years (range 20–97, standard deviation 13.31); 55% were women. At the end of the follow-up, that is, up to 12 years, a total of 34.1% of the teeth had been reported as extracted. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, based on follow-up data at 10 years after registration of the periradicular surgery, included 5548 teeth, of which 1461 (26.3%) had been extracted. Significant associations between the independent variables tooth group and dental care setting (both p <.001) and the dependent variable extraction were found. The highest odds ratio (OR) for extraction applied to tooth group: compared to maxillary incisors and canines, mandibular molars were at greatest risk of extraction (OR 2.429, confidence interval 1.975–2.987, p <.001).

    Conclusions: After periradicular surgery in predominantly elderly people in Sweden, approximately three-quarters of the teeth are retained over a 10-year period. The type of tooth is associated with extraction: mandibular molars are at greater risk of extraction than maxillary incisors and canines.

  • 2.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Endodontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Endodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Socio-economic risk indicators for apical periodontitis2006In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 123-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to reveal possible socio-economic risk indicators for apical periodontitis.

    Material and Methods. In 1992–93 a representative sample of women in Göteborg, Sweden, aged 38–84 years, participated in a medical and dental survey (n=981) which included dental and medical examinations and dental radiographic examination (OP). The dependent variable was apical periodontitis (AP = 0, AP > 0). The independent variables were age, number of teeth, number of restored teeth, number of root-filled teeth, number of teeth with carious lesions, satisfactory masticatory function, and dental esthetics as crude measures of self-reported dental health, dental anxiety, time elapsed since last visit to a dental office, regular dental visiting habits, smoking, alcohol habits, and marital status. A subjective evaluation of economy, health and life situation (acceptable or poor) was accounted for as socio-economic variables. The oldest age group, women born 1908, and edentulous individuals were omitted, leaving 844 subjects for analysis. Statistical analysis included multivariate logistic regression, chi-squared test, and independent t-test for comparison of group characteristics (AP = 0 vs AP > 0).

    Results. For socio-economic variables there was a significant association between acceptable health and apical periodontitis (OR = 1.72 (CI = 1.09–2.70)). For oral-related variables, root-filled teeth (OR = 1.17 (CI = 1.10–1.23)) and teeth with carious lesions (OR = 1.48 (CI = 1.19–1.85)) were predictive of apical periodontitis.

    Conclusions. In the present study, socio-economic variables and dental visiting habits did not appear to have obvious implications for periapical health, whereas root-filled teeth and carious lesions were associated with apical periodontitis.

  • 3.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Endodontology/Oral Diagnosis, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Ahlqwist, Margareta
    Bengtsson, Calle
    Endodontic variables and coronary heart disease2003In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study was designed to explore a possible association between endodontic disease variables and coronary heart disease (CHD). Dental infections are hypothesized to be linked to atherosclerosis and could be a cause of vascular changes crucial for the development of CHD. Most studies have focused on periodontal disease. To our knowledge, no one has specifically studied endodontic variables as risk factors for the development of CHD. In 1992-93, a representative sample (n = 1056) of women in Göteborg, Sweden, aged between 38 and 84 years, took part in a combined dental and medical survey. The dependent variable was CHD, i.e. subjects with angina pectoris and/or a history of myocardial infarction (n = 106). The independent variables were number of root-filled teeth (RF), number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA), tooth loss (TL), age, life situation, marital status, smoking, alcohol habits, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, hypertension and diabetes. The multivariate logistic regression analysis did not prove the endodontic variables to be predictive of CHD. Only age and tooth loss were significantly associated with CHD, with OR = 1.07 (CI = 1.03-1.12) and OR = 2.70 (CI = 1.49-4.87), respectively. The bivariate logistic regression analysis showed a positive significant association between subjects with RF = 2 and CHD, but for PA the bivariate analysis did not support an association with CHD. This cross-sectional study did not reveal a significant association between endodontically treated teeth and CHD nor between teeth with periapical disease and CHD.

  • 4.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Endodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Endodontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Technical quality of root fillings and periapical status in root filled teeth in Jönköping, Sweden2008In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 958-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study changes in technical quality of root fillings and periapical status in root filled teeth in random samples of 20 to 70 year-olds between 1973 and 2003.

    Methodology

    Data from dentate subjects aged 20–70 years from examinations conducted in 1973 (n = 498), 1983 (n = 530), 1993 (n = 547) and 2003 (n = 491) were used for the analysis. Length of root fillings were measured on radiographs to the nearest 0.1 mm. Adequate seal was defined as a root filling without lateral and/or apical voids. Periapical status was assessed according to the periapical index. All observations were made by one calibrated observer registered from full mouth radiographic examinations. Teeth with root fillings ending within the canal without lateral or apical voids were considered adequate. The association between root filling quality and periapical status was analysed by means of the Chi-squared test and a multilevel logistic regression analysis.

    Results

    Adequately root filled teeth had a significantly lower frequency of apical periodontitis than inadequately root filled teeth (11.8% vs. 22.8%). The frequency of technically adequate root fillings increased statistically significant from 1973 (23.7%) to 2003 (36.4%) without a concomitant improvement of the periapical status in root filled teeth over time (24.5% vs. 24.6%).

    Conclusions

    This study reports on an improving technical quality of root fillings over time, without a concomitant improvement of the periapical status in root filled teeth. A larger proportion of treated molars over time may be of importance for the result.

  • 5.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    et al.
    Institute of Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Research Centre, Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Merdad, Khalid
    Reit, Claes
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Birkhed, Down
    Root-filled teeth and recurrent caries: A study of three repeated crodd-sectional samples from the city of Jönköping, Sweden2011In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 401-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that root-filled teeth are at a higher caries risk than non-root-filled teeth. Materials and methods. Two sub-samples from epidemiologically obtained data collected in 1983, 1993 and 2003 in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, were analysed. All the participants were examined clinically and radiographically and the type of filling and the presence or absence of caries were recorded. Sub-sample 1 comprised 832 individuals (9202 teeth) aged 20–70 years with at least eight premolars/molars. In sub-sample 2, 163 subjects (577 teeth) with only one or two decayed tooth surfaces and at least one tooth with full crown coverage were analysed. Results . Logistic regression analysis found that root-filled teeth were predictive of recurrent caries when controlling for the type of restoration in sub-sample 1 (OR = 1.68; 1.41–2.0; CI 95%) and sub-sample 2 (OR = 2.20; 1.07–4.52; CI 95%). Conclusion . In support of the suggested hypothesis, the data revealed a significant association between root-filled teeth and recurrent caries.Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00016357.2011.572291

  • 6.
    Johansson, Louise
    et al.
    Dental Research Department, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Specialist Clinic of Endodontology, Public Dental Health Service, Region Örebro County, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Jakob Jonsson
    Dental Research Department, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Endodontics, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wirén, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Dental Research Department, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Department of Endodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frequency of apical periodontitis in root-filled teeth restored with post and core: A 5-year retrospective study2024In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In conjunction with post placement in root-filled teeth with periapical healthy conditions, root canal retreatment may be performed to improve the seal of the root canal. Whether root canal retreatment for technical reasons (retreatments in teeth without apical periodontitis (AP)) results in lower frequency of AP is unknown.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether there is a difference in frequency of AP between roots with root canals retreated for technical reasons, and roots with root canals not retreated before post placement, with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Also, to examine changes in root filling quality following root canal retreatment for technical reasons.

    METHODS: This retrospective study included radiographs of 441 root-filled roots without periapical radiolucencies at baseline, scheduled for post and core treatment. Follow-up data for a minimum of 5 years were available for 305 roots (loss to follow-up 30.8%), 46 of which were retreated for technical reasons. Two calibrated observers assessed root filling sealing quality and length, respectively, and periapical status according to the Periapical Index. The main outcome of the study, AP, was used as the dependent variable and all analyses were performed at root level.

    RESULTS: The overall frequency of AP at follow-up was 13.8%. The difference in frequency of AP between retreated (4.3%) and nonretreated (15.4%) root canals was not statistically significant, p = .061. Analyses including only roots with preoperatively inadequate root filling quality showed a statistically significant difference (p = .017) between the two treatment groups (2.4% vs. 22.9%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Root canal retreatment for technical reasons before post and core placement significantly reduces the frequency of AP in roots with inadequate root filling quality.

  • 7.
    Landt, K.
    et al.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hagstam-Harrison, L.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kvist, T.
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dawson, V. S.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bjørndal, L.
    Department of Cariology and Endodontics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    EndoReCo, (Group author)
    Fransson, H.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Demographic factors in Swedish adults undergoing root filling and subsequent extraction of a maxillary first molar: a comparative study2018In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 975-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the demographics of Swedish adults who had received a root filling, followed by extraction during the following 5–6 years in comparison with subjects who had undergone a corresponding root filling with an uneventful outcome.

    Methodology: The root filled maxillary first molar was chosen as the comparison model. The Swedish Social Insurance Agency provided data on all teeth reported as root filled in Sweden during 2009. A comparison group, equally large as the study group, was constructed by randomly selecting subjects with root filled maxillary first molars, which had not subsequently been extracted, that is, an uneventful outcome. Demographic data on the subjects were obtained from Statistics Sweden: country of birth, disposable income, educational level, age, civil status and gender. Chi-square, t-tests and logistic regression were used for statistical analyses.

    Results: In the year 2009, 36 139 maxillary first molar teeth were reported to have been root filled, 4362 (12.1%) of which were then recorded as extracted during the following 5–6 year period. Only minor intergroup differences were noted: 86.5% of the study group were Swedish-born, compared with 84.4% of the comparison group (P = 0.007). Women comprised 53.2% of the study group and 50.5% (P = 0.01) of the comparison group. There was an association between extractions and gender as well as age; men had a lower odds ratio (OR) for extraction OR, 0.87; confidence interval (CI), 0.80–0.95. For every additional year, the chance for extraction was higher OR, 1.01; CI, 1.01–1.01. No other significant differences were detected.

    Conclusions: There was only little or no demographic differences between the study group, comprising Swedish adults who had undergone root filling of one of their maxillary first molars in 2009 and subsequent extraction during the following 5–6 years, and the comparison group, with uneventful outcomes after a corresponding root filling. 

  • 8.
    Lindfors, Ninita
    et al.
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, POB 450, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekestubbe, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, POB 450, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Endodontol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Lund, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, POB 450, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Is cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) an alternative to plain radiography in assessments of dental disease?: A study of method agreement in a medically compromised patient population2024In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 28, no 2, article id 127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesPoor oral health and dental infections can jeopardize medical treatment and be life-threatening. Due to this, patients with head and neck malignancies, generalized tumor spread, organ transplant, or severe infection are referred for a clinical oral and radiographic examination. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic agreement of three radiographic modalities: intraoral radiographs (IO), panoramic radiographs (PX), and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for diagnosis of dental diseases.Materials and methodsThree hundred patients were examined with IO, PX, and CBCT. Periapical lesions, marginal bone level, and caries lesions were diagnosed separately by four oral radiologists. All observers also assessed six teeth in 30 randomly selected patients at two different occasions. Kappa values and percent agreement were calculated.ResultsThe highest Kappa value and percent agreement were for diagnosing periapical lesions (0.76, 97.7%), and for the assessment of marginal bone level, it varied between 0.58 and 0.60 (87.8-89.3%). In CBCT, only 44.4% of all teeth were assessable for caries (Kappa 0.68, 93.4%). The intra-observer agreement, for all modalities and diagnoses, showed Kappa values between 0.5 and 0.93 and inter-observer agreement varied from 0.51 to 0.87.ConclusionsCBCT was an alternative to IO in diagnosing periapical lesions. Both modalities found the same healthy teeth in 93.8%. All modalities were performed equally regarding marginal bone level. In caries diagnosis, artifacts were the major cause of fallout for CBCT.Clinical relevanceIntraoral radiography is the first-hand choice for diagnosing dental disease. For some rare cases where intraoral imaging is not possible, a dedicated panoramic image and/or CBCT examination is an alternative.

  • 9.
    Norderyd, Ola
    et al.
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden;Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö, Sweden.
    Koch, Göran
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Papias, Apostolos
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Anastassaki Köhler, Alkisti
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nydell Helkimo, Anna
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brahm, Carl-Otto
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Lindfors, Ninita
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Anna
    Public Dental Health Service, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ullbro, Christer
    UiT. The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway.
    Wärnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden, during 40 years (1973-2013): I. Review of findings on oral care habits and knowledge of oral health2015In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 57-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the this study was to present data on oral care habits and knowledge of oral health in 2013, and to compare these data with results from a series of four previous cross-sectional epidemiological studies. All these studies were carried out in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, in 1973, 1983, 1993, 2003, and 2013. The 1973 study constituted a random sample of 1,000 individuals evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. The same age groups with addition of a group of 80-year-olds were included in the 1983, 1993, 2003, and 2013 studies, which comprised 1,104; 1,078; 987; and 1,010 individuals, respectively.

    A questionnaire about dental care habits and knowledge of oral health was used. The questionnaire contained the same questions in all the five studies, although some had to be slightly modernised during the 40-year period.

    During the period 1973–2013, a continous increase of individuals in the age group 20–60 years were treated by the Public Dental Service amounting to about 50%. Almost 70% of the 70- and 80-year-olds were treated by private practitioners. In 2013, 10–20% of the individuals in the age groups 30–40 years did not regularly visit neither Public Dental Service nor a private practitioner. The corresponding figures for the individuals 50–80 years old were 4–7%. Similar number of avoidance was reported in the previous studies.

    In the survey 2013, about 20–30% of the individuals in the age groups 20–50 felt frightened, sick, or ill at ease at the prospect of an appointment with the dentist. These findings were in agreement with the results from the surveys 1973–2003. Among the younger age groups, 10–15 years, a reduction in self-reported "ill at ease" was found in the surveys 2003 and 2013 compared to the previous surveys in this series.

    In 2013, the knowledge of the etiology of caries was known by about 60% of the individuals which was similar to that reported 1973–2003. Twenty per cent of the individuals stated that they did not know which etiological factors that causes caries. This percentage was equivalent during the period 1973–2013. About 85% of the individuals in all age groups brushed their teeth with fluoride tooth paste at least two times a day. These frequencies have gradually increased during the 40-year period.

    Around 40% in the age groups 50–80 years used toothpicks regularly in 2013. This is a about 1/3–1/2 less compared to 2003. In the age groups 20–40 years 3–14% used toothpicks for proximal cleaning in 2013.

    In 2013, about 35% of the individuals never consumed soft drinks, in comparison with 20% in 2003. In the age groups 3–20 years about 20% were consuming soft drinks every day or several times a week, which is a reduction by half compared to 2013

  • 10.
    Norderyd, Ola
    et al.
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden;Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö, Sweden.
    Koch, Göran
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Papias, Apostolos
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Anastassaki Köhler, Alkisti
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nydell Helkimo, Anna
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brahm, Carl-Otto
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Lindfors, Ninita
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Anna
    Public Dental Health Service, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ullbro, Christer
    UiT. The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway.
    Wärnberg Gerdin, Elisabeth
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden during 40 years (1973-2013): II. Review of clinical and radiographic findings2015In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 69-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this epidemiological study performed in 2013 was to analyze various clinical and radiographic data on oral health and compare the results to those of four cross-sectional studies carried out 1973–2003. In 1973, 1983, 1993, 2003, and 2013 random samples of 1,000; 1,104; 1,078; 987; and 1,010 individuals, respectively, were studied. The individuals were evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 years. Eighty-year-olds were not included in 1973. All subjects were inhabitants of the city of Jönköping, Sweden.

    The clinical and radiographic examination assessed edentulousness, removable dentures, implants, number of teeth, caries, restorations, oral hygiene, calculus, periodontal status, and endodontic treatment.

    The frequency of edentulous individuals aged 40–70 years was 16, 12, 8, 1, and 0.3% in 1973, 1983, 1993, 2003, and 2013, respectively. No complete denture wearer younger than 80-years old was found in 2013. During the 40-year period, the mean number of teeth in the age groups 30–80 years increased. In 2013, the 60-year-olds had nearly complete dentitions. Implants were found in all age groups from 30 years of age. The total number of individuals with implants was 36 in 2013. This was higher than earlier surveys, 4 in 1993, and 18 in 2003.

    The percentage of children and adults without caries and restorations increased during the 40-year period. It was found that the percentage of caries-free 3- and 5-year-olds were 79% and 69%, respectively, of the individuals in 2013. In the age groups 10–20 years, the percentage of caries-free individuals increased between 2003 and 2013. In 2013, 43% of the 15-year-olds were completely free from caries and restorations compared to 20% in 2003. In all age groups 5–60 years, DFS was lower in 2013 compared to the earlier examinations. There was no major change in DFS between 2003 and 2013 in the age groups 70 and 80 years. The most obvious change was the decrease in number of FS over the 40- year period of time. Regarding crowned teeth the most clear changes between 1973 to 2013 were the decrease in percentage of crowned teeth in the age goups 40 and 50-year-olds. The percentage of endodontically treated teeth decreased between 1973 and 2013 in all age groups.

    In age groups 10–30-year-olds a major reduction from about 30% to 15% in mean plaque score was seen between 1973–2003. Only a minor change in plaque score was seen during the last decade. For the age groups 40 years and older, a decrease in the percentage of surfaces with plaque was observed between 2003–2013. The percentage of tooth sites with gingivitis was for 20 years and older about 40% in 1973. In 2013, the percentage was about 15%. The frequency of sites with gingivitis was generally lower in 2013 compared with the other years, 1973–1993.

    The percentage of individuals with probing pocket depths >4mm increased with age. Between 2003–2013 a clear reduction was seen in all age groups in frequency of individuals with probing pocket depth >4mm. Over the 40-year period an increase in the number of individuals with no marginal bone loss and a decrease in the number of subjects with moderate alveolar bone loss were seen.

    The continuous improvement in oral health and the reduced need of restorative treatment will seriously affect the provision of dental helath care and dental delivery system in the near future.

  • 11.
    Silnovic, Zlatan
    et al.
    Specialist clinic of Endodontology, Public Dental Health Service, Västra Götaland Region, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kvist, Thomas
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Department of Endodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Periapical status and technical quality in root canal filled teeth in a cross sectional study in Jönköping, Sweden2023In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 249-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate the quality of root canal fillings and frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) in root canal filled teeth in a Swedish population.

    Material and methods

    This study used data from a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2013. The root canal filling quality and periapical status were assessed in 491 root canal filled teeth in 196 individuals aged 20-70 years, randomly selected from the population of Jonkoping, Sweden. All root canal filled teeth were examined with periapical radiographs. Three calibrated observers recorded length and density in root canal fillings as well as periapical status according to the Periapical Index. A root filling ending within 0.5-2 mm from the radiographic apex without lateral or apical voids was considered adequate. Data were analyzed in a generalized estimating equation (GEE) model with AP as dependent variable and gender, age, number of teeth, number of root filled teeth, tooth type, and root filling quality as independent variables.

    Results

    Teeth with technically inadequate root fillings were associated with AP in a simple GEE-analysis. In the multiple GEE-model, the association between technical quality and apical peridontitis was nonsignificant when controlling for tooth type and gender.

    Conclusions

    The quality of root canal fillings is poor and the prevalence of AP in root canal filled teeth is high, particularly in molar teeth, in a Swedish population.

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