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  • 1.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Coordination of new product development and supply chain management2018In: Innovation and Supply Chain Management: Relationship, Collaboration and Strategies / [ed] Moreira, António Carrizo, Ferreira, Luís Miguel D. F., Zimmermann, Ricardo A., Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 33-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New product development (NPD) and supply chain management (SCM) enable companies to respond to new demands in a responsive manner. The scarcity of research addressing the coordination of NPD and SCM is notable. The purpose of this research is to identify and examine linkages between NPD and SCM through a case study that includes a Swedish furniture wholesaler. Several linkages that stress the need of using an integrative NPD process where the design functions are aligned with other main functions of the company were identified. For example, it was observed that a strong focus on the demand side (NPD) has induced high demands on the supply side (SCM) of the case company. Therefore, the NPD process to a larger extend needs to incorporate main supply functions and other sales-related functions that support the commercialization of the product. This promises to create a consumer-oriented business, especially needed in markets where products have short life cycles and where having a short time to market is crucial. Within future research, it will be interesting to expand this research to companies that operate in different markets and/or have different objectives and to provide an inclusive description of the consumer-oriented business model.

  • 2.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    et al.
    AB Ludvig Svensson, Kinna.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Involving Suppliers In A Lean Training Program2019In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, Vietnam, 2019, OSCM, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes of a manufacturer involving its suppliers in their lean training program. A single in-depth case study is conducted to examine a lean training program that was offered by Scania to five suppliers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at Scania and these suppliers to explore the outcomes of the training program. The interview findings were triangulated by completing observations and focus groups at the suppliers. Four main outcomes are identified after the completion of the training program. First, the suppliers became easier to collaborate with due to better internal ways of working and more trust in terms of reliability. Second, the suppliers improved their ability to identify possible problems that could jeopardize deliveries. Third, the suppliers improved their delivery precision. Fourth and finally, financially unstable suppliers were less perceptive to the lean training program than financially stable suppliers. This study also proposes avenues for future research.

  • 3.
    Murillo-Oviedo, Ana Beatriz
    et al.
    National University of Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa Rica.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Achieving market orientation through cross-functional integration2019In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to understand how cross-functional integration contributes to the market orientation of a company that strives to increase market responsiveness. A case study in the Brazilian beverages industry was conducted and empirical data was collected through fourteen in-depth interviews from various functions within the company. The findings indicate that cross-functional integration enables the company to achieve market orientation through two main processes: product launch and customer complaints. Cross-functional integration enables a company to disseminate knowledge about organizational dynamics at both departmental and individual levels, to generate interdependency, to improve the awareness about the internal needs, and to improve the internal knowledge about the customer. This study shows that practitioners need to establish cross-functional integration, as it contributes to the market orientation of a company. Internal knowledge enables practitioners to create value through products and services, while still preserving the corporate image. It also shows that cross-functional teams and meetings are necessary to achieve market orientation in a company.

  • 4.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical success factors for ERP system implementation: A user perspective2018In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 285-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The research was conducted in two successive steps. First, a literature review was conducted to derive CSFs for ERP system implementation. Second, a survey was conducted to evaluate the importance of these CSFs from a user perspective. Data were collected through a questionnaire that was distributed within a German manufacturer and was developed based on the CSFs found in the literature. Gray relational analysis (GRA) was used to rank the CSFs in order of importance from a user perspective.

    Findings

    The findings reveal that users regard 11 of the 13 CSFs found in the literature as important for ERP system implementation. Seven of the CFSs were classified as the most important from a user perspective, namely, project team, technical possibilities, strategic decision-making, training and education, minimum customization, software testing and performance measurement. Users regarded 2 of the 13 CSFs as not important when implementing an ERP system, including organizational change management and top management involvement.

    Research limitations/implications

    One limitation of this study is that the respondents originate from one organization, industry and country. The findings may differ in other contexts, and thus, future research should be expanded to include more organizations, industries and countries. Another limitation is that this study only evaluates existing CSFs from a user perspective rather than identifying new ones and/or the underlying reasons using more qualitative research.

    Practical implications

    A better understanding of the user perspective toward CSFs for ERP system implementation promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, a more successful implementation and a more effective operation. When trying to successfully implement an ERP system, the project team may use the insights from the user perspective.

    Originality/value

    Even though researchers highlight the important role users play during ERP system implementation, their perspective toward the widely discussed CSFs for ERP system implementation has not been investigated comprehensively. This study aims to fill this gap by evaluating CSFs derived from the literature from a user perspective.

  • 5.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Högskolan i Gävle, Industriell ekonomi.
    Integrated new product development: A supply chain perspective2018In: Proceedings of the 11th Triennial Conference of Association of Asia Pacific Operational Research Societies (APORS), Kathmandu, Nepal, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Performing Supply Chain Design Activities during Product Development Projects: A Systematic Literature Review2019In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, Vietnam, 2019, OSCM, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the supply chain design (SCD) activities that an OEM can perform when developing new products. This purpose is realized by systematically examining peer-reviewed journal articles written in English. The search strategy adopted in this research is based on selected databases and keywords. Crossreferencing is used to identify additional relevant articles. This resulted in a synthesis sample of 93 relevant articles. From this synthesis sample, a set of SCD activities that can be performed by OEMs during product development projects are extracted. These activities are discussed by using a subset articles (47) from the synthesis sample.

  • 7.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Mukhtar, U.
    Department of Management Sciences, GIFT University, Punjab, Pakistan.
    Implementation of enterprise resource planning systems: A user perspective2018In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering / [ed] N. Kurniati, R. S. Dewi, D. S. Dewi, D. Hartanto, N. I. Arvitrida, P. D. Karningsih, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2018, Vol. 337, no 1, article id UNSP 012049Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three Pakistani companies that recently have implemented a new ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF's level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users believe that management should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment. 

  • 8.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Mukhtar, Umer
    GIFT University, Pakistan.
    Enterprise resource planning system implementation: A user perspective2018In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three organizations from Pakistan that have recently implemented an ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF’s level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users of the three organizations in Pakistan believe that the implementing organization should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment.

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  • 9.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sansone, Cinzia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment: A grey relational analysis2017In: Management Challenges in a Network Economy: Proceedings of the MakeLearn and TIIM Joint International Conference, Lublin, 17–19 May, 2017., ToKnowPress , 2017, p. 169-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations capabilities has been a common research area for many years and several frameworks have been offered. The existing frameworks are general and do not take specific contexts into consideration, such as a high cost environment. This research gap is of interest as a manufacturing relocation process has been taking place during the last decades, resulting in a vast amount of manufacturing being moved from high to low cost environments. The purpose of this study is to analyse critical operations capabilities in a high cost environment. A survey study was conducted, which focused on the evaluation of an existing framework of operations capabilities in the specific high cost environment context. Data was collected by a questionnaire that was developed based on the existing framework and distributed to 14 managers in five Swedish manufacturing firms. Grey relational analysis (GRA) was used to rank and cluster the dimensions and operations capabilities. The findings revealed that all the dimensions and operations capabilities included in the framework were critical in a high cost environment. However, the analysis also indicated that different emphasis was put on the different dimensions and capabilities. Thus, the dimensions and capabilities were ranked in order of critically and clustered as either ‘most critical’, ‘critical’, or ‘least critical’. The most critical dimension was ‘quality’ while the least critical dimension was ‘environment’. The critical dimensions included ‘delivery’, ‘cost’, ‘flexibility’, ‘service’ and ‘innovation’. The findings increased the validity of the framework and its usefulness in a high cost environment.

  • 10.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wewering, D.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Enterprise resource planning system implementation: An end user perspective2016In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 10 of 10
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