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  • 1.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Medicon Valley - A globally competitive, transnational bioregion2007Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Methods and applications of regional innovation systems analysis2015In: Handbook of research methods and applications in economic geography / [ed] Karlsson, Charlie; Andersson, Martin and Norman, Therese, Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 272-290 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vang, Jan
    Copenhagen Institute of Technology, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Constructing knowledge-based regional advantage: Implications for regional innovation policy2007In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 7, no 2-5, 140-155 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on constructing regional advantage requires an 'unpacking' of what makes territorial agglomerations important for innovation and competitiveness by disclosing and revealing the contingencies, particularities and specificities of the various contexts and environments where knowledge creation, innovation and entrepreneurship take place. In order to achieve more effective regional innovation policy, this paper presents and discusses three dimensions along which such unpacking can take place. These dimensions refer to (1) specific industrial knowledge bases, (2) globally distributed knowledge networks and (3) different territorial competence bases.

  • 4.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University.
    Vang, Jan
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Regional innovation system policy: A knowledge-based approach2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on constructing regional advantage requires an unpacking of what makes territorial agglomerations important for innovation and growth by disclosing and revealing the contingencies, particularities and specificities of the various contexts and environments where knowledge creation, innovation and entrepreneurship take place. In order to achieve more effective regional innovation policy, the paper presents and discusses five dimensions along which such unpacking can take place. These dimensions refer to different perspectives that originate in different industrial knowledge bases, different territorial competence bases, the distributed knowledge base, the importance of creative knowledge environments and different institutional frameworks.

  • 5.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Isaksen, Arne
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sotarauta, Markku
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Knowledge bases, modes of innovation and regional innovation policy: a theoretical re-examination with illustrations from the Nordic countries2011In: Beyond territory: Dynamic geographies of knowledge creation, diffusion, and innovation / [ed] Harald Bathelt, Maryann Feldman and Dieter F. Kogler, Milton Park: Routledge, 2011, 227-249 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Tödtling, Franz
    Institute for Regional Development and Environment, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria.
    Constructing regional advantage: Towards state-of-the-art regional innovation system policies in Europe?2011In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 19, no 7, 1133-1139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core arguments of the constructed regional advantage (CRA) approach stem from the work that started in Brussels in an expert group appointed by DG Research of the EU Commission. In 2006, DG Research launched the final report on "Constructing Regional Advantage" as the new way of taking on and combating new challenges and problems of globalization for European regions (Asheim et al., 2006). CRA means turning comparative advantage into competitive advantage through an explicit policy push promoting a Chamberlinian monopolistic competition based on product differentiation creating unique products, an assumption which was fundamental for Porter's cluster approach also. While building on the lessons from the dynamic principle of the theory of competitive advantage (Porter, 1990, 1998) as well as of the innovation system approach (Lundvall, 2008) emphasizing that competitiveness can be influenced by innovation policies and supporting regulatory and institutional frameworks, the constructed advantage approach recognizes the important interplay between industrial and institutional dynamics as well as calls for greater attention to multi-level governance. What is especially highlighted is the role of a proactive public-private partnership and impact of the public sector and public policy support by acknowledging to a greater extent the importance of institutional complementarities in knowledge economies. This approach represents an improved understanding of key regional development challenges as well as a better anticipation and response to the problems by addressing system failures of lack of connectivity in regional innovation systems (RIS).

  • 7.
    Benneworth, Paul
    et al.
    Center for Higher Education Policy Studies, University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Exploring the multiple roles of Lund University in strengthening Scania's regional innovation system: Towards institutional learning?2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 11, 1645-1664 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities are increasingly seen as potential contributors to regional innovative capacity by serving as local knowledge conduits, bringing global state-of-the-art science and technology into the region. In practice, however, more active university engagement with their regional innovation systems is not as straightforward as it may seem. The article uses examples from a successful case by which less successful regions could be inspired. Our analysis considers how various forms of technological learning intersecting within Lund University around three distinct sectoral engagement efforts have been built up and how this created new structural regional innovation capacity.

  • 8.
    Bergman, Karin
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Ejermo, Olof
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Fischer, Josefine
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Kalsø Hansen, Høgni
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Effects of VINNOVA programmes on small and medium-sized enterprises - the cases of Forska&Väx and VINN NU2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first impact analysis that exclusively deals with R&D funding taking place after the foundation of VINNOVA. Since the long-term effects of R&D projects are visible only years after the ending of the projects the analysis deals with impacts expected to be found in a shorter time span. The focus of the present impact analysis is to identify and analyze the presence and strength of behavioural additionality at small and medium-sized companies that received support from the VINNOVA programmes Forska&Väx (2006 – 2008) and VINN NU (2002 – 2008). Behavioural additionality is defined as changes in enterprise behaviour related to government R&D funding.

  • 9.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Ljungh, Bertil
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Vinnväxt i Skåne2007In: Regional växtkraft i en global ekonomi: det svenska Vinnväxtprogrammet / [ed] Staffan Laestadius, Cali Nuur & Håkan Ylinenpää, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2007, Vol. s. 219-236, 219-236 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Putting constructed regional advantage into Swedish practice2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 4, 587-604 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of the pre-history and evolution of a regional innovation system initiative supporting activities at the intersection of traditional food production and modern biotechnology. Drawing on established ideas on the triple helix of industry, university and government and its impact on innovative capacity (as they are formulated in the regional innovation systems approach) and more recently introduced ideas on differentiated industrial knowledge bases, the study illustrates how regional innovation system support initiatives are formulated and implemented in close dialogue with the actors and activities constituting the systems under support. The initiative analysed in this paper is a good example of pro-active and fine-tuned regional innovation policy, referred to as constructed regional advantage. By focusing on an initiative targeting the renewal of a mature industry in a declining phase of its life cycle, the paper fills a gap in the literature which so far has dealt mostly with emerging industries at the start of their life cycle. Two innovation trajectories that contributed to the formulation of the initiative, and now benefits from it, are used to illustrate the arguments.

  • 11.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nodes, networks and proximities: On the knowledge dynamics of the Medicon Valley biotech cluster2004In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 12, no 7, 1003-1018 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical research on the knowledge dynamics of biotechnology demonstrates a dual local-global knowledge flow pattern. The sector is characterised by strong spatial concentration around nodes of excellence that are interconnected through a global network. This requires a specification of the notion of proximity as a facilitator of learning processes which emphasises its multifaceted configuration. This study highlights the significance of relational proximity within epistemic communities shaping innovation processes across multi-spatial scales. These arguments are illustrated with a database-survey on collaboration in scientific publication by 109 biotechnology firms in the Danish-Swedish life-science cluster Medicon Valley.

  • 12.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Martin, Hanna
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Path renewal in old industrial regions: Possibilities and limitations for regional innovation policy2015In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 49, no 5, 850-865 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the potential, barriers and limitations for regional innovation policy to facilitate industrial renewal in old industrial regions. It draws on a case analysis of the policy programme ‘Biorefinery of the Future’ geared to promote renewal of the forest industry in Northern Sweden. It is shown that infusion of radical emergent technology is necessary for new regional path development, but not sufficient. To avoid a singular focus on technology-push, policy should pay more attention to complementary experimentation processes in relation to demand-side characteristics, firm strategies and business models as well as regulatory aspects. Moreover, coordination between regional innovation policy and adjacent domains and levels of policy-making is needed as some of the most pressing obstacles for renewal are not specific to the region but instead to the industry at large.

  • 13.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU), Oslo, Norway.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Martin, Hanna
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Renewal of mature industry in an old industrial region: regional innovation policy and the co-evolution of institutions and technology2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to further insights on the potentials and barriers for industrial renewal in locked-in regions and industries. To do so, the paper analyzes the Swedish policy program ‘Biorefinery of the Future’ (BioF). This initiative is geared to develop a strong regional innovation environment for forestry-based biorefinery development in the area of Örnköldsvik and Umeå in Northern Sweden. Theoretically, the paper draws on concepts from evolutionary economic geography regarding path-dependence, related variety and lockin, and combines these with institutional approaches found in science and technology studies to explain disruptive shifts or transitions in socio-technical systems.

  • 14.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ryan, Camille
    Faculty of Communication and Culture, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Phillips, Peter
    Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Comparing a pharmaceutical and an agro-food bioregion: On the importance of knowledge bases for socio-spatial patterns of innovation2006In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 13, no 4, 393-414 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to compare the socio-spatial patterns of innovation and knowledge linkages of a biopharmaceutical and an agro-food biotech cluster. Dissimilarities can be expected based on differences in terms of historical technological regimes and sectoral innovation system dynamics between the agro-food and pharmaceutical industries in general and particularly the distinctive analytical (science-based) knowledge base of biopharmaceuticals in contrast with the more synthetic (engineering-based) knowledge base of agro-food biotechnology. Drawing on bibliometric data and case material the study compares two representative bioregions: a biopharmaceutical cluster in Scania, Sweden and an agro-food biotech cluster in Saskatoon, Canada. The empirical study supports the theoretical expectations and shows that knowledge dynamics in the agro-food cluster are more localized than in the biopharmaceuticals cluster. It is important, however, to acknowledge that these differences are relative. Both sectors display local and non-local patterns of collaboration following the general pattern for biotechnology.

  • 15.
    Erlingsson, Gissur Ó
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Centrum för kommunstrategiska studier – CKS, Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Öhrvall, Richard
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Lokal och regional tillväxtpolitik: Vad kan och bör offentliga aktörer göra?2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna rapport är att kartlägga forskning som har försökt besvara frågan vad offentliga aktörer i regioner och kommuner kan göra för att stärka tillväxten. Forskningsöversikten kompletteras med tentativa empiriska illustrationer som försöker finna samband mellan lokal tillväxt och några av de faktorer som i tidigare litteratur lyfts fram som särskilt betydelsefulla för tillväxt.

  • 16.
    Henning, Martin
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation and regional transformation: From clusters to new combinations2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In summary, this book considers the conditions for a future innovation policy in Skåne from two perspectives. Firstly, from the existing economic structure; and secondly, from the experience gained from initiatives already in place. With a common theoretical understanding of the problem area, the book integrates a number of methodologically different approaches. Such a combination of methods is rare, yet provides a deeper understanding of the nature of the economy, of how the various sectors and industries are related to each other in terms of skills, and of how development initiatives for the various industries or clusters work. Theoretical discussions are intertwined with empirical observations of Skåne’s economy. In this way, the book is an introduction to contemporary innovation and policy literature, as well as a more specific discussion and decision basis for actors involved in the economy and policy of both Skåne and Sweden.

  • 17.
    Henning, Martin
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Lunds universitet.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Lunds universitet.
    Innovation och regional omvandling: Från Skånska kluster till nya kombinationer2010Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Manniche, Jesper
    et al.
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy, Lund University.
    Testa, Stefania
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energetics, Management and Transports, University of Genoa, Italy.
    Combinatorial knowledge bases: An integrative and dynamic approach to innovation studies2017In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 93, no 5, 480-499 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this article are (1) to critically review the theoretical arguments and contribution of the knowledge base approach to economic geography and innovation studies, and the value added and limitations of applying it in empirical studies as reported about in the extant literatures; (2) to propose a new interpretation of the knowledge base approach by integrating it into a larger analytical framework for innovation studies that integrates individual, organizational, and contextual aspects, and to discuss the possible advances that come from using it in economic geography studies. The article dismisses the widespread taxonomical application of knowledge base conceptualizations for classification of firms, industries, and economies into fixed categories based on their dominant knowledge base characteristics. Rather it argues that the knowledge base characteristics vary not only between firms and industries but also over time and through innovation trajectories in firms and industries. The new interpretation implies that the knowledge base characteristics are defined not only by individual-level modes and rationales for knowledge creation and application and by their related spatial implications but also by managerial–organizational aspects with regard to coordination and exploitation of such knowledge dynamics. The integration of literatures from different disciplinary strands, now unified under the umbrella of a reinterpreted knowledge base approach, advances the explanatory value of the knowledge base approach in economic geography and innovation studies as well as related disciplines.

  • 19.
    Manniche, Jesper
    et al.
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research (CRT), Bornholm, Denmark.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Testa, Stefania
    Polytechnic School, University of Genova, Italy.
    Combinatorial knowledge bases: integrating cognitive, organizational and spatial dimensions in innovation studies and economic geography2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper has three aims. Firstly, to provide a critical review of previous conceptualizations of the knowledge base approach in the research fields of innovation studies and economic geography. Secondly, to propose a broadened interpretation of the knowledge base approach which allows for considering combinatorial knowledge bases within and across industries, regions and time periods and for analytically integrating the cognitive, organizational and spatial dimensions of innovation and learning. Thirdly, to provide methodological suggestions for how to apply such broadened interpretation of the knowledge base approach in empirical innovation studies, regardless of industrial, geographical or temporal context. The paper thereby dismisses the wide-spread taxonomical application of knowledge base conceptualizations in innovation studies and economic geography for classification of firms, industries and economies into fixed categories based on their knowledge base characteristics. Instead it proposes a typological approach and a conceptual and methodological basis for explaining the shifting dynamics of innovation processes in firms, industries and economies. In addition to highlighting limitations and strengths of the knowledge base approach, the paper thus targets investigation of unexploited potentials of knowledge base conceptualizations and provides suggestions for future research.

  • 20.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Comparing knowledge bases: on the geography and organization of knowledge sourcing in the regional innovation system of Scania, Sweden2013In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 20, no 2, 170-187 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with knowledge flows and collaboration between firms in the regional innovation system of southern Sweden. The aim is to analyse how the functional and spatial organization of knowledge interdependencies among firms and other actors varies between different types of industries that draw on different types of knowledge bases. We use data from three case studies of firm clusters in the region: (1) the life science cluster represents an analytical (science-based) industry, (2) the food cluster includes mainly synthetic (engineering-based) industries, and (3) the moving media cluster is considered to be symbolic (artistic based). Knowledge sourcing and knowledge exchange in each of the cases are explored and compared using social network analysis in association with data gathered through interviews with firm representatives. Our findings reveal that knowledge exchange in geographical proximity is especially important for industries that rely on a symbolic or synthetic knowledge base, because the interpretation of the knowledge they deal with tends to differ between places. This is less the case for industries drawing on an analytical knowledge base, which rely more on scientific knowledge that is codified, abstract and universal and are therefore less sensitive to geographical distance. Thus, geographical clustering of firms in analytical industries builds on rationales other than the need for proximity for knowledge sourcing.

  • 21.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Comparing knowledge bases: on the organisation and geography of knowledge flows in the regional innovation system of Scania, southern Sweden2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with knowledge flows and collaboration between firms in the regional innovation system of southern Sweden. It focuses on industries which draw on different types of knowledge bases. The aim is to analyse how the functional and spatial organisation of knowledge interdependencies among firms and other actors vary between different types of industries which are part of the same regional innovation system. We argue that knowledge sourcing and exchange in geographical proximity is especially important for industries that rely on a synthetic or symbolic knowledge base, since the interpretation of the knowledge they deal with tend to differ between places. This is less the case for industries drawing on an analytical knowledge base, which rely more on scientific knowledge that is codified, abstract and universal, and therefore less sensitive to geographical distance. Thus, geographic clustering of firms in analytical industries builds on other rationale than the need of proximity for knowledge sourcing and exchange. To analyse these assumptions empirically, we draw on data from three case studies of firm clusters in the region of southern Sweden: (1) the life science cluster represents an analytical (science) based industry, (2) the food cluster includes mainly synthetic (engineering) based industries, and (3) the moving media cluster is considered as symbolic (artistic) based. Knowledge sourcing and knowledge exchange in each of the cases are explored and compared using social network analysis in association with a dataset gathered through interviews with firm representatives.

  • 22.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation in symbolic industries: the geography and organisation of knowledge sourcing2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with geographical and organisational patterns of knowledge flows in the media industry of southern Sweden, an industry that is characterised by a strong ‘symbolic’ knowledge base. Aim is to address the question of the local versus the non-local as the prime arena for knowledge exchange, and to examine the organisational patterns of knowledge sourcing with specific attention paid to the nature of the knowledge sourced. Symbolic industries draw heavily on creative production and a cultural awareness that is strongly embedded in the local context; thus knowledge flows and networks are expected to be most of all locally configured, and firms to rely on informal knowledge sources rather than scientific knowledge or principles. Based on structured and semi-structured interviews with firm representatives, these assumptions are empirically assessed through social network analysis and descriptive statistics. Our findings show that firms rely above all on knowledge that is generated in project work through learning-by-doing and by interaction with other firms in localised networks. The analysis contributes to transcending the binary arguments on the role of geography for knowledge exchange which tend to dominate the innovation studies literature.

  • 23.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation in symbolic industries: the geography and organization of knowledge sourcing2011In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 19, no 7, 1183-1203 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with geographical and organizational patterns of knowledge flows in the media industry of southern Sweden, an industry that is characterized by a strong ?symbolic? knowledge base. The aim is to address the question of the local versus the non-local as the prime arena for knowledge exchange, and to examine the organizational patterns of knowledge sourcing with specific attention paid to the nature of the knowledge sourced. Symbolic industries draw heavily on creative production and a cultural awareness that is strongly embedded in the local context; thus knowledge flows and networks are expected to be most of all locally configured, and firms to rely on less formalized knowledge sources rather than scientific knowledge or principles. Based on structured and semi-structured interviews with firm representatives, these assumptions are empirically assessed through social network analysis and descriptive statistics. Our findings show that firms rely above all on knowledge that is generated in project work through learning-by-doing and by interaction with other firms in localized networks.

  • 24.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Regional innovation policy beyond 'best practice': Lessons from Sweden2011In: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 2, no 4, 550-568 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with policy measures in the regional innovation system of Scania, Southern Sweden. Focus is on the innovation policy requirements of actors representing industries that draw on different knowledge bases. Previous studies have identified profound industry-specific differences concerning the organisation of knowledge sourcing between firms and other actors. In correspondence with these findings, industries are also expected to vary with regard to how policy measures aiming to support innovation are perceived and implemented. Still, there is a tendency among regional policy programmes to base their strategies on one ‘best practice’ model, inspired by successful (or sometimes less successful) cases in other parts of the world. Here, regional policy initiatives targeting three distinct industries in Scania, namely life science, food and moving media, are discussed, in particular their ability to meet the specific needs and demands of firms in these industries. The findings reveal that the existing initiatives are customized on a rather generic level and not sufficiently fine-tuned to the particular needs and demands of the respective actors. Policies are recommended to take the specific characteristics of the industrial knowledge base into account in order to provide appropriate support and to become an effective part of the institutional framework of the regional innovation system.

  • 25.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Regional innovation policy beyond ‘best practice’: Lessons from Sweden2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with policy measures in the regional innovation system of Scania, Southern Sweden. Focus is dedicated to requirements on innovation policy from actors representing different industries. Previous studies have identified profound differences with regard the organization of knowledge sourcing between firms and other actors in industries drawing on different knowledge bases. In correspondence with these findings, industries differ also with regard to how policy measures aiming to support innovation are perceived and acquired. Despite this, there is a tendency among regional policy programs to base their strategies on one ‘best practice’-model, inspired by successful (or sometimes less successful) cases in other parts of the world. The paper presents an in-depth analysis of such policy support targeting three industries located in one region, and ends with a suggestion to how those should be adapted to render influence on the institutional framework of the regional innovation system.

  • 26.
    Miörner, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Trippl, Michaela
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Lund University and Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Creating institutional preconditions for knowledge flows in cross-border regions2017In: Environment and Planning. C, Government and Policy, ISSN 0263-774X, E-ISSN 1472-3425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, we have witnessed an intensive scholarly discussion about the limitations of traditional inward looking regional innovation strategies. New policy approaches put more emphasis on promoting the external connectedness of regions. However, the institutional preconditions for collaboration across borders have received little attention so far. The aim of this paper is to investigate both conceptually and empirically how policy network organizations can target the institutional underpinnings and challenges of cross-border integration processes and knowledge flows. The empirical part of the paper consists of an analysis of activities performed by four cross-border policy network organizations in the Öresund region (made up of Zealand in Denmark and Scania in Sweden) and how they relate to the creation of institutional preconditions and the removal of institutional barriers. Our findings suggest that cross-border policy network organizations have limited power to change or facilitate the adaptation of formal institutions directly. They mainly rely on mobilizing actors at other territorial levels for improving the formal institutional conditions for knowledge flows. Informal institutions, on the other hand, can be targeted by an array of different tools available to policy network organizations. We conclude that institutional preconditions in cross-border regions are influenced by collective activities of multiple actors on different territorial levels, and that regional actors mainly adapt to the existing institutional framework rather than change it. For innovation policy, this implies that possibilities for institutional change and adaptation need to be considered in regional innovation policy strategies.

  • 27.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Principles and practices of knowledge creation: On the organization of "buzz" and "pipelines" in life science communities2008In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 84, no 4, 449-469 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article links up with the debate in economic geography on "local buzz" and "global pipelines" as two distinct forms of interactive knowledge creation among firms and related actors and argues for a rethinking of the way social scientists should approach interactive knowledge creation. It highlights the importance of combining the insights from studies of clusters and innovation systems with an activity-oriented approach in which more attention is paid to the specific characteristics of the innovation processes and the conditions underpinning their organization. To illustrate the applicability and added value of such an alternative approach, the notion of embeddedness is linked with some basic ideas adopted from the literature on knowledge communities. The framework is then applied to a study of innovation activities conducted by firms and academic research groups working with biotechnology-related applications in the Swedish part of the Medicon Valley life science region. The findings reveal that local buzz is largely absent in these types of activities. Most interactive knowledge creation, which appears to be spontaneous and unregulated, is, on closer examination, found safely embedded in globally configured professional knowledge communities and attainable only by those who qualify.

  • 28.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Institutionen för kulturgeografi och ekonomisk geografi, Lunds universitet.
    Sites and modes of knowledge creation: On the spatial organization of biotechnology innovation2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The accelerated speed and intensity of global interconnections in all segments of society during the last couple of decades have had a profound impact on the workings of contemporary capitalism. Increased pressure is put on national and regional economies to continuously upgrade their competitive advantages, at the same time as new learning opportunities occur at a faster rate than ever. For reasons like these, knowledge is described as the most important resource, and learning the most important process, for firms and organizations, as well as nations and regions, to become and remain competitive. In parallel with the forces of globalization there are however also strong forces of localization. Empirical studies reveal that knowledge intensive industries tend to agglomerate in space, often in proximity to leading universities and research institutes, and several policy initiatives raised in attempts to meet the challenges of globalization are focused on promoting local knowledge spillovers between industry and academia. Observations like these intrigue geographers interested in the spatial organization of innovation and raises important questions about what is local and what is global in the globalizing learning economy.

    This study takes these observations as point of departure and develops a conceptual framework used to analyze the spatial organization of innovation in biotechnology. Biotechnology is a suitable case for such analysis since it represents a set of activities in the intersection of science and industry which displays both globalization and localization. By combining a system perspective with in-depth focus on concrete knowledge creation activities the study explains how and why knowledge interaction between firms and related actors varies with different activities embedded in the innovation processes. Empirical focus is put the Swedish-Danish bioregion Medicon Valley. The study is reported in five articles which can also be read separately. Two of the articles focus on the aggregate of dedicated biotechnology firms (DBFs) composing the bioregion, while the remaining three focus on a selection of DBFs and academic research groups involved in innovation projects spanning from basic science with not yet fully identified commercial applications to more applied product development in different subfields of biotechnology related industries.

  • 29.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Coenen, Lars
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Explaining spatial patterns of innovation: Analytical and synthetic modes of knowledge creation in the Medicon Valley life-science cluster2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, no 5, 1040-1056 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors address the dichotomy around ‘proximate’ and ‘distant’ learning processes by looking specifically at the characteristics of the knowledge-creation process. By way of suggesting an alternative conceptualization to the well-known tacit–codified knowledge dichotomy they propose a distinction between ‘analytical’ and ‘synthetic’ modes of knowledge creation. Analytical knowledge creation refers to the understanding and explaining of features of the (natural) world. Synthetic knowledge creation refers to the design or construction of something to attain functional goals. By applying this framework to qualitative empirics from the Medicon Valley life-science cluster, the authors demonstrate the complementarity of globally distributed analytical knowledge creation and locally oriented synthetic knowledge creation.

  • 30.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Two sides of the same coin? Local and global knowledge flows in Medicon Valley2010In: Business networks in clusters and industrial districts: The governance of the global value chain / [ed] Fiorenza Belussi, Alessia Sammarra, London: Routledge, 2010, Vol. s. 356-376, 356-376 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Knowledge collaboration and proximity - The spatial organization of biotech innovation projects2007In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 14, no 2, 115-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the role of proximity for knowledge collaboration between dedicated biotechnology firms (DBFs) and related actors. Innovation projects managed by a selection of eight Swedish DBFs are analysed in detail and classified with regard to their specific knowledge characteristics. Based on this classification, explanations to the relative importance of functional and relational proximity to collaborators are sought.The findings indicate that knowledge collaboration in projects characterized by embodied knowledge are more sensitive to functional proximity than projects characterized by embrained and encoded knowledge. The findings also indicate that even though functional proximity is facilitative, global knowledge collaboration is indispensable for most DBFs. The convenience of local collaboration can never replace the extreme requirements of specialized knowledge, which forces them to seek collaborators on a global arena despite the impediments they face in these situations. Policy resources aimed at promoting bioregions are therefore better used to enhance local resources and to provide conditions for DBFs to link up with global sources of knowledge rather than to boost the formation of `second best' local networks.

  • 32.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    School of Economics and Management, Lund University.
    Svensson Henning, Martin
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University.
    Clusters in time and space: Understanding the growth and transformation of life science in Scania2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the growth and development of the Scanian life science cluster by revisiting a previous empirical study in the light of new theoretical findings. It is argued that the transformation of the Scanian cluster must be evaluated with reference to the general development of the life science sector in Sweden as well as internationally. Therefore the position of Scania in different systems of regions must be taken into account. Patterns of functional interdependency within as well as between regions thus need to be explored on equal terms. This paper particularly highlights the importance of Stockholm/Uppsala for the growth and evolution of the Scanian cluster.

  • 33.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sack, Lionel
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Authenticity renewal - institutions, innovation systems and Cognac evolution (when the rules of the game don't change)2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on observations from a long-established network in France, located around the town of Cognac – site of distilled beverages with the same name. Firms within this network have been successful in developing new types of products in the past decades, drawing on and diverging from the conservative culture upon which the region and beverage have built their reputation. The paper reveals that a thick institutional setting, which has been in place for more than a century and is being maintained to preserve the quality and authenticity of the Cognac product, also serve as enablers for new development among local firms.

  • 34.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sack, Lionel
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Explaining cluster evolution from an institutional point of view: evidence from a French beverage cluster2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the evolution of a ‘protected label of origin’ cluster in France with a particularly homogeneous and explicit institutional framework, which has given birth to significant incremental and radical changes in recent decades. By providing insights into these change processes and their institutional preconditions, the study provides an operational framework that disentangles different types of institutional change that are shaped by preconditions in the cluster - but that also shape the cluster on an aggregate level. The study distinguishes between institutional triggers for change of incremental versus radical nature, mainly focusing on inefficiencies that emerge over time in a given institutional framework. It suggests that incremental change processes have their main origin in developments on the regulative and normative dimension of institutions within the cluster, whereas more radical change processes require a wider set of preconditions, of which change on the cognitive dimension is crucial.

  • 35.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sack, Lionel
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation under the protected label of origin: heritage, influence and expanding horizons in Cognac2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that firms react differently to the same institutional configurations due to their different backgrounds. This study examines a regional economy in France in which 300 firms are operating under the same framework conditions and have done so over a long period. From observations we argue that even when all previously respected factors and backgrounds are identical between firms, their responses to the institutional configuration will diverge and bring them on different development trajectories. We identify four distinct groups of observed trajectories, and argue for specific endogenous and exogenous factors that make firms from those groups within the institutional configuration react differently. The observed different responses to the established institutional framework are likely to be increasingly visible at times of or around major external change events affecting the industry as a whole (such as global financial crises, emergence or decline of markets etc.).

  • 36.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sack, Lionel
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Institutional stability and industry renewal: Diverging trajectories in the Cognac beverage cluster2016In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 23, no 5, 448-464 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adding to approaches highlighting network dynamics as a basis for regional economic development, increased attention is paid to institutions as contextual factors contributing to explaining how and why economies change. Research has shown that firms tend to react differently to the same institutional configurations, with the main explanatory factors being their sectoral backgrounds and intra-firm characteristics. This study adds to these insights by examining a regional economy in France, that of Cognac, in which 300 firms are operating under homogeneous institutional preconditions. Despite these similarities, we identify different development trajectories from the 1990s onwards. Our observations illustrate how firms’ responses to external change diverge and bring them on different trajectories due to different positions in the industry hierarchy and different experiences and capabilities among individuals within firms. The study contributes to the better understanding of mechanisms of path dependence, which have gained wide recognition in the literature in the recent decades.

  • 37.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Trippl, Michaela
    Department of Geography and Regional Research, University of Vienna, Austria.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Policy learning and smart specialization: Balancing policy change and continuity for new regional industrial paths2017In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 44, no 3, 382-391 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to explain what policy approaches and policy measures are best suited for promoting new regional industrial path development and what needs and possibilities there are for such policy to change and adapt to new conditions in order to remain efficient. The paper departs from the notion of Smart Specialization and discusses how regional strategies that are inspired by this approach influence path renewal and new path creation and how they are related to and aligned with policy strategies implemented at other scales (local, regional, national, supranational). Our main argument is that new regional industrial growth paths require both continuity and change within the support structure of the innovation system. Unless smart specialization strategies are able to combine such adaptation and continuity, they fail to promote path renewal and new path creation. Our arguments are illustrated with empirical findings from the regional innovation system of Scania, South Sweden.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-10-01 14:32
  • 38.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Institutional conditions and innovation systems: On the impact of regional policy on firms in different sectors2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 1, 127-138 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutional conditions and innovation systems: on the impact of regional policy on firms in different sectors, Regional Studies. This paper deals with institutional conditions in regional innovation systems: how institutions affect the organization of innovation activities among firms; and in what ways regional policy initiatives can be supportive. The analysis draws on data on innovation networks, activities, and regional policies targeting the life science, media and food industries in Scania, Sweden. The study takes account of the ways in which regional policies can impact individuals' and organizations' action in relation to each other by being internalized. It is argued that such ability is decisive for the success or failure of the policy initiative.

  • 39.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Regional innovation policy and coordination: Illustrations from Southern Sweden2015In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 42, no 2, 147-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analytical framework of regional innovation systems highlights the systemic nature of regional economies and the need for policy coordination within regions. Coordination presupposes an understanding of the underlying problems that may act as barriers to regional development. Three generic problems facing regions are: lack of resources (e.g. human and financial capital), negative lock-in (e.g. to historically strong sectors), and fragmentation of actors and activities. There are only a few examples of innovation system studies that investigate these problems by analysing actors and their activities as well as the institutional framework surrounding them. This paper offers a framework for analysing innovation system problems, focusing on actors and activities as well as institutions. In doing so, the need for coordination of activities performed by different actors is highlighted, as is the relevance of neutrality in the coordinating function. Three sectoral policy initiatives in a Swedish region are studied.

  • 40.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Multiple paths of development: knowledge bases and institutional characteristics of the Swedish food sector2016In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 24, no 3, 589-606 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore the relation between the critical knowledge base of firms and how firms respond to incentives embedded in the institutional framework surrounding them. The analysis gives us a better understanding of the complex development of the food sector in Southern Sweden in the past decades. Theoretically, the paper combines concepts of path dependency and knowledge bases, and applies this framework to a set of development trajectories of firms in the Scanian food sector. Three development paths are identifiedpath extension, path renewal and new path creation. Findings illustrate that these are rooted in different knowledge base combinations of firms, which make them respond differently to similar place- and sector-specific institutional conditions.

  • 41.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Multiple paths of development: Knowledge bases and institutional characteristics of the Swedish food sector2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explain the complex development of the food sector in Southern Sweden in the past decades, focusing on the relation between institutions and innovation practices and taking into account the diversity of actors composing the sector. The paper develops a theoretical framework combining concepts of path dependency and knowledge bases, and applies it empirically. The three paths identified in the paper resemble path development via radical change, incremental change and diversification.

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