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  • 1.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Gothenburg University, Department of Languages and Literatures, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ashamed of Who I Am: Levinas and Diasporic Subjectivity in Salman Rushdie’s Shame2014Ingår i: Ethics and Poetics: Ethical Recognitions and Social Reconfigurations in Modern Narratives / [ed] M. Gunnarsdóttir Champion & I. Goloubeva Rasmussen, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014, s. 81-107-Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I will inquire into the complex experience of shame that in Levinas seems essential to subjectivity in its encounter with others and further see how this might inform our understanding of Salman Rushdie’s novel Shame that deals with the notion of shame as expiatory. In Rushdie’s novel, it is the shamelessness of political power that becomes literally embodied in the character of Sufiya Zinobia who expiates for the unfelt shame of her father and is eventually taken over by the fiery and ravenous beast of shame in a twist of magical realism. It is the unfelt presence of shame, in other words, that seems to prevent truly ethical experience. The novel, I will argue, traces what Levinas in Otherwise than Being calls ‘the torsion of a complex’ that consciousness feels whenever it tries to excuse suffering. It is only in shame, in the presence of affect, Rushdie seems to suggest, that we revert back to the originary charity of being, to our humility and our compassion, sorely lacking in contemporary political consciousness.

  • 2.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik.
    “Being Ashamed: An Ethics of a Blush”2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Black and Ashamed: Deconstructing Race in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man2018Ingår i: Shame and Modern Writing / [ed] Barry Sheils & Julie Walsh, New York: Routledge, 2018, s. 112-132Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will consider the significance of racial shame for the constitution of the black subject and determine its implications for our reading of invisibility in Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man. I will argue that the primary expression of black American experience and its determination within the narrow orbit of white narrative is the affective experience of shame. Implicated in the racialized metaphysics of power relations that dominates Ellison’s world, shame both foments the violence of internalized oppression and the violence of self-valorizing racial orthodoxy in black nationalisms. Departing from Foucault’s notion of subjectivization whereby agency is determined by the individualizing strategies of power, the paper, however, plots a different narrative of invisibility in Ellison’s novel that harbors emancipatory possibilities. The totalizing regimes of identification that articulate and structure our social existence will be shown to be effectively undermined by Ellison’s intervention in the racial imaginary, testifying to his ability to look beyond the blockages of his present and anticipate alternate forms of subjectivity that are yet to be realized in the constituencies of our history.

  • 4.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Göteborgs universitet.
    Black and Ashamed: Racial Shame in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will argue that the primary expression of the traumatic experience that constitutes black American identity and its determination within the narrow orbit of white narrative is the affective experience of shame. Implicated in the racialized metaphysics of power relations that dominates Ellison’s world, shame foments the violence of internalized oppression and sets in motion contradictory desires that either move towards identification and mimicry or the self-valorizing practices of racial orthodoxy in nationalist movements. Both reproduce violence and reinforce the structures of invisibility that force black subjectivity underground. Shame, as the exposure of blackness under the white gaze, will here emerge as the contorted cry of history forced out of the violated, lashed, black body that haunts and conditions any perception of the present that would stabilize black identity. Using a range of discursive structures within which shame has been theorized, the paper will show its significance for our reading of invisibility in Ellison’s novel and its implications for the fact that race legislates for identity.

  • 5.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Culture at Our Borders2018Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It has become increasingly difficult today to characterize cultural belonging. This is not to suggest that cultures have disappeared but that it has become impossible to think of them as homogeneous, providing us with totalizing expressions of collective identity. The globalizing movement of modernity, the deterritorializing flows of its economic relations and the migration that follows it show that the borders between cultures have dissolved while the concept of culture itself is more than ever characterized by internal tensions. It is then neither cultural identity nor its constitutive outside that is central to culture but rather the movement in which it already resides. This movement brings with it the diasporization of cultures that can no longer be essentialized or reterritorialized as homogenous. Indeed, as Hardt and Negri have already argued: “We must cleanse ourselves of any misplaced nostalgia for the belle époque of that modernity.”The fact that the uniform notion of culture has met its demise is also what calls for its violent revivals. We can witness this across our political landscapes where vigorous resurgence of cultural nationalism, racial orthodoxy and ethnocentrism is gaining traction, generating new claims of legitimacy for the subject. Old hatreds of identity politics have flared up and the mythogeny of body, blood, birth, origin is again rekindled as a currency in the nostalgic rhetoric of nationalist movements. The “belle époque” of modernity with its horrors seems on the verge of repeating itself. But, perhaps, cultures have never been part of that époque. The concepts of nation, of race and ethnic absolutism we have used to determine our place in modernity, have given the impression of there being something else that preexists our present and our history that have always been characterized by the movement of innumerable and partial differences. Perhaps our reality has, in fact, always been at our borders, never one but constituted of a myriad of syncretic narratives, crosscurrents of meaning and transcultural encounters.This seminar will focus on cultures in transfer in literary studies and theory, welcoming contributions that may cover but are not limited to the following topics: 

    • Significance of home in diaspora literatures
    • Authenticity and nostalgia
    • (Im)possibility of place in a global world
    • Identity formation in transcultural contexts    
    • Diaspora and its (dis)contents
    • Affect theory and cultural displacement
    • Gender and diasporic identity
    • Queering migration
    • Liminality and borders
    • Circulation of memory
    • Migration and cultural dispossession
    • Ethnicity and race in global community
    • Cultural difference in the Anthropocene
    • World literature, a moving concept
  • 6.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Gothenburg University, Department of Languages and Literatures, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deconstructing the Past in W.G. Sebald's The Emigrants: Historiography and Memory in Postmodern Writing2014Ingår i: Der reisende Europäer / [ed] E. Platen & L. Karlsson Hammarfelt, München: IUDICIUM Verlag GmbH, 2014, s. 26-43Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    When Linda Hutcheon in her work on postmodern aesthetics and historiography (1988) speaks of “history as ‘a true novel’” she seems both to sum up the postmodern skepticism towards historical knowledge but also point towards what, in an unfortunate turn of phrase, could be called a poetics of history, flashing out the fact that history and fiction may not be as too far apart as it may seem. W. G. Sebald’s novel The Emigrants could be seen as a site of contention where desperate attempts by the narrator to preserve the memory of the past are constantly undermined by the unreliability of the very means by which he attempts to maintain its legitimacy. Reflecting on the nature of historical knowledge and memory in Sebald’s novel, this paper intends to consider whether history, insofar as it shares its narrative conventions with fiction, is not past but perhaps yet and always to be determined.

  • 7.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    For a Future to Come: Derrida’s Democracy and the Right to Literature2013Ingår i: Journal of East-West Thought (JET), ISSN 2161-7236 (Print), 2168-2259 (Online), Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 13-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflecting on the political nature of literature and its relation to modern democracy, the essay begins by problematizing any notion of commitment in literature. However, irresponsibility found in literature, far from undermining the political process, is what animates the political field seen as an endless contestability of our social practice. The way our notion of modern democracy informs our understanding of literary practice is explored through a selection of Derrida’s writings where democracy emerges as the possibility of imagining alternatives to the world and “of thinking life otherwise,” as Derrida (2004) says, which is to say that democracy cannot be thought without the possibility of literature. Democracy implies not political stability but a continuous call for unrest that prevents its atrophy, and literature, in its unconditional right to call everything to account, is its rearguard work as it were, keeping democracy forever open, for better or for worse.

  • 8.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik.
    Introduction to Emmanuel Levinas: ‘After you, sir!’2011Ingår i: Moderna Språk, ISSN 0026-8577, Vol. 105, nr 1, s. 58-73Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 9.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mimicry and Shame in Naipaul’s The Mimic Men and Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss2017Ingår i: Comparative Critical Studies, ISSN 1744-1854, E-ISSN 1750-0109, Vol. 14, nr 2-3, s. 205-224Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflecting on the affective nature of diasporic experience, the essay begins by developing Arendt's understanding of displacement as a temporal disjunction of being caught between the claims of the past and the exigencies of the present. The impossibility of salvaging the past against the often stifling imperatives of the present that she accounts for in her essay 'We Refugees' is, however, also what produces affective economies in the diasporic subject that I argue are crucial to diasporic identity formation. In this respect, I focus on shame, which I see as an affective residue of the unsalvageable past in the experience of displacement. In order to determine and further develop the significance of shame for diasporic subject formation, this essay will consider its impact on subjectivity in a comparative close reading of two contemporary novels, V. S. Naipaul's The Mimic Men and Kiran Desai's The Inheritance of Loss, both of which manifest the elision of the past in diasporized subjects and the movement towards strategies of identification articulated in mimicry. Mimicry, seen in Fanon's rather than Bhabha's terms, as a disavowal of the past, fails, however, to provide a viable strategy of identification for a diasporic subject in the novels that testify rather to the affective cost of our incumbent efforts to start anew. 

  • 10.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Medie-, litteratur- och språkdidaktik.
    (Mis)reading Proust: Style, Rhetoric, Allegory2011Ingår i: Theorising textuality. Theorising reading: om vetenskaplig teoribildning inom kultur- och litteraturforskning / [ed] Eva Ahlstedt, Göteborgs: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för språk och litteraturer , 2011, Vol. 3, nr 10, s. 105-117Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The incursion of style upon our ability to read, indeed of stylus, of a pointed object that “might be used in a vicious attack against what philosophy appeals to in the name of matter,” as Derrida writes in Spurs, will here take the form of specific tropological concerns that will be given in terms of Paul de Man’s understanding of allegory and reading. Style, inescapably tied to rhetoric and figurativity as a mode of expression, would be a syncope of cognition present in every text. A disruptive possibility of the text that outmatches its potential to be read. Style, seen in these terms, is a certain excess/lack of text that opens to a jouissance of reading, the pain of having read always too much or too little, of always having read otherwise. What the rhetorical structure of reading points to, as we shall see in de Man’s reading of Proust, is the radical impossibility of its closure.

  • 11.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik.
    “Not Human Enough: Levinas and a Call for New (Old) Humanism”2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Not Human Enough: Levinas and a Call for New (Old) Humanism2013Ingår i: An Insatiable Dialectic: Essays on Critique, Modernity, and Humanism / [ed] Roberto Cantú, Cal State University, LA, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, s. 104-120Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The humanity of man, Levinas argues in Humanism of the Other, is not defined by rationality or subjectivism of freedom, it is found instead in absolute humility and subjection of my freedom to the vulnerability of others. Indeed, for Levinas, the subject itself is constituted as singular or unique by an assignation of responsibility it cannot escape. The fact that no one can respond to the distress of others in my stead is what so imperially consigns me to my idenitity.

     

    The critique of humanism that is implicit in Levinas does not testify so much to its failure as to the hypocrisy of the humanist projects based on reason, integrity, autonomy and the dignity of the subject, its naive rights of freedom and self-assertion often appropriated by the discourses of exploitation and used as a shameless pretext for virile imperialism and colonial aggression. Instead, for Levians, humanism has not risen to the true height of its ideals, of what it means to be human. It is the status and the menaing of this ideal that this paper will question. For to be human is to be called to goodness such that the other counts more than myself. Freedom of the subject, ‘is not the source of all right and meaning,’ as Levians writes in Ethics and Infinity. It is rather the possibility of self-sacrifice and being for the other. Being called to goodness is being sobered up to a responsibility that for Levians is manifested as the-one-for-the-other, even as ‘substitution unto death.’ To be human is to call into question the prejudice of my freedom and my self-righteousness. It is to discover onself in passivity. The other person’s vulnerability, his mortality, comes as the effraction of my being, of my rights, and exposes the injustice of my selfish will. True humanness seems, in fact, to demand more than my capacity. I am thus never responsible enough, I am never human enough. The presence of the other person, the unabated pathos of his need and vulnerability, revelas me to my own shame, to a kind of self-effacement and absolute discretion of my own presence. There is a supplication to a freedom that precedes mine and to respond to it is to be human.

     

    This paper will point towards a certain insufficiency of humanism and the inheritance of its concept in the context of Levinas’s writing as an expression a post-Enlightenment critique both of the notions of freedom and autonomy that are put in question in the responsibility for the other but also in terms of its pre-critical naivité about ‘the human nature’ and the metaphysics of the unified subject. Self-relation is broken in Levinas by infinite incumbent responsibilities that devolve on the subject like an insolvent debt one can never settle in good conscience. The self with all its resources is in a permanent deficit.

  • 13.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    “The Ethics of Comopolitan Memory”2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    “The Immigrant and Me: Letting Go or Holding On”2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 15.
    Filipovic, Zlatan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU). Department of Languages and Literatures/English, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Towards an ethics of shame2017Ingår i: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 99-114Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from Levinas, this paper will address the significance of shame in contemporary discourse in order to approach what could be called its ethical intrigue. Focusing on its political, social and phenomenological implications, I intend to reconsider the experience of shame as it has been appropriated within the politics of affect and account for its relation to ethics, which alone can reveal its transformative possibilities. Shame will emerge as an affect of proximity whose basic structure of being exposed is an attestation of our constitutive openness to others that towers above the politics of interest and the structures of economy that advance the drama of the Ego.

1 - 15 av 15
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