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  • 1.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Imani, Vida
    Pediatric Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Chen, Hsin-Pao
    Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, E-DA Hospital, I-Shou University, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Mediating Roles of Psychological Distress, Insomnia, and Body Image Concerns in the Association Between Exercise Addiction and Eating Disorders2023In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 16, p. 2533-2542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Exercising can promote good health. However, excessive exercising may have downsides. This study examined the association between exercise addiction and eating disorders and whether the identified association was mediated by psychological distress, insomnia (including sleep quality), and body image concern.

    Methods: A total of 2088 adolescents (mean age of 15.3 years) participated in this cross-sectional study by questions assessing exercise addiction, eating disorders, psychological distress, insomnia, sleep quality, and body image concern.

    Results: There were significantly positive relationships between the variables (r=0.12-0.54, p<0.01) with effect sizes from small to large. The four potential mediators (ie, insomnia, sleep quality, psychological distress, and body image concern), individually and in total, significantly mediated the association between exercise addiction and eating disorders.

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that exercise addiction in adolescents may influence eating disorders through multiple pathways, such as insomnia, psychological distress, and body image concerns. Future research should examine these relationships longitudinally and use gathered information to inform intervention development. Clinicians and healthcare workers are encouraged to assess exercise addiction when treating individuals with eating disorders.

  • 2.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong 999077, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 701, Taiwan..
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Nottingham NG1 4FQ, England..
    Chen, Hsin-Pao
    E DA Hosp, Dept Surg, Div Colon & Rectal Surg, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan.;I Shou Univ, Coll Med, Sch Med, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan..
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, S-55333 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, S-55333 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Cyberchondria, Fear of COVID-19, and Risk Perception Mediate the Association between Problematic Social Media Use and Intention to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine2022In: Vaccines, E-ISSN 2076-393X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vaccination is the most effective way to control the COVID-19 pandemic, but vaccination hesitancy threatens this effort worldwide. Consequently, there is a need to understand what influences individuals' intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Restriction of information gathering on societal developments to social media may influence attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination through exposure to disinformation and imbalanced arguments. The present study examined the association between problematic social media use and intention to get the COVID-19 vaccine, taking into account the mediating roles of cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception. In a cross-sectional survey study, a total of 10,843 residents of Qazvin City, Iran completed measures on problematic social media use, fear of COVID-19, cyberchondria, COVID-19 risk perception, and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results showed that there was no direct association between problematic social media use and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Nonetheless, cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception (each or serially) mediated associations between problematic social media use and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. These results add to the understanding of the role of problematic social media use in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, i.e., it is not the quantity of social media use per se that matters. This knowledge of the mediating roles of cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception can be used by public health experts and policymakers when planning educational interventions and other initiatives in COVID-19 vaccination programs.

  • 3.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Yahaghai, Rafat
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Nottingham, England.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran.
    The mediational role of trust in the healthcare system in the association between generalized trust and willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination in Iran2022In: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, ISSN 2164-5515, E-ISSN 2164-554X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some individuals, there appears to be some level of unwillingness in getting a COVID-19 vaccine which may be due to trust issues. The present study used a mediation model to investigate how trust is associated with an individual's willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination among Iranians. A total of 10,843 Iranian adults were recruited in Qazvin province using a multistage stratified cluster sampling method. The survey was completed between February 19 and April 9, 2021. The findings showed that generalized trust was positively associated with trust in the healthcare system, trust in the healthcare system was positively associated with willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination, and generalized trust was positively associated with willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination. Also, trust in the healthcare system mediated the association between generalized trust and willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination. There were some significant demographic differences in COVID-19 vaccination willingness. The findings suggest that generalized trust plays a significant role in directly or indirectly influencing individuals' willingness to get COVID-19 vaccine. Therefore, government bodies and health officials may utilize these findings to appeal in a more transparent and professional manner in encouraging individuals to get a COVID-19 vaccine. However, for those with lower trust levels (in general and in the healthcare system), the focus may be to re-build and/or regain the individuals' trust through carefully planned transparent communication, information dissemination, and ethical education to help increase the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination.

  • 4.
    Alijanzadeh, Mehran
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan 70101, Taiwan..
    Yahaghi, Rafat
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Rahmani, Jalal
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Yazdi, Nahid
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Elahe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Alijani, Hashem
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Zamani, Narges
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Fotuhi, Razie
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Taherkhani, Elham
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Buchali, Zeinab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Robabe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Mahmoudi, Narges
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Poorzolfaghar, Leila
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Ahmadizade, Safie
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Shahbazkhania, Azam
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Measurement Invariance and Differential Item Functioning of the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults (HELIA): A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study in Iran2022In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 2064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health literacy is important for health behavior engagement. Therefore, it is important to have a good instrument assessing health literacy with a theoretical framework. The present study aimed to examine the measurement invariance and differential item functioning (DIF) of a newly developed health literacy instrument; that is, the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults (HELIA). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch models were used to examine the data collected from a large Iranian sample (N = 9678; 67.3% females; mean age = 36.44 years). All the participants completed the HELIA. CFA was used to examine if the HELIA had a five-factor structure (including reading, access to information, understanding, appraisal, and decision making/behavioral intention factors) and multigroup CFA to examine if the five-factor structure of HELIA was invariant across gender, educational level, accommodation, and age subgroups. Rasch models were used to examine whether each factor of HELIA was unidimensional and DIF contrast in Rasch to examine if the HELIA items were interpreted similarly across the aforementioned subgroups. The CFA results supported the five-factor structure of HELIA, and the Rasch models verified that each HELIA factor is unidimensional. Additionally, multigroup CFA supported the measurement invariance of HELIA across the following subgroups: male vs. female; highly educated vs. poorly educated; city residents vs. suburban residents; and younger age vs. older age. The DIF contrasts in the Rasch models additionally showed that there are no substantial DIF items in the HELIA across aforementioned subgroups. Therefore, the HELIA is a feasible and comprehensive instrument assessing health literacy across different populations in Iran.

  • 5.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Non Communicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Elahe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Non Communicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Yale Univ, Ctr Child Study, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.;Yale Univ, Ctr Child Study, Sch Med, Dept Neurosci, New Haven, CT 06511 USA..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Univ Rd, Tainan 701401, Taiwan..
    Wu, Chien-Yi
    E Da Hosp, Dept Pediat, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan.;I Shou Univ, Sch Med, Coll Med, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, S-55318 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Binge-Watching and Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 15, article id 9707Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Binge-watching, the viewing of online videos or streamed content, may be associated with different types of mental health problems. The present study aimed to investigate the associations between binge-watching and five mental health concerns including depression, loneliness, sleep problems, anxiety, and stress. Methods: Academic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, PsycINFO, and Psych Articles were systematically searched through February of 2022. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the methodological quality. A meta-analysis was performed on Fisher's z values as effect sizes, using a random effect model. Publication bias, small study effect, and moderators in this association were assessed. Results: Binge-watching was significantly associated with the five types of mental health concerns with the most robust correlations found with stress (0.32) and anxiety (0.25). Stronger associations between binge-watching and two types of mental health problems (depression and sleep problems) were found during the COVID-19 pandemic than before the pandemic. Moreover, stronger associations between binge-watching and two types of mental health problems (stress and sleep problems) were found in developing countries than in developed countries. Conclusions: The associations between binge-watching and mental health concerns were significant and positive. Programs and interventions to reduce binge-watching should be considered and tested.

  • 6.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin, Iran..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Occupat Therapy, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Ullah, Irfan
    Gandhara Univ, Kabir Med Coll, Peshawar, Pakistan..
    Griffiths, Mark
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Dept Psychol, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science.
    Item Response Theory Analysis of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S): A Systematic Review2022In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 15, p. 581-596Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is still ongoing and is not yet under control. Evidence regarding the impacts of COVID-19 on psychological distress has been widely reported worldwide, and one of the primary concerns regarding psychological distress is fear (ie, fear of COVID-19). Therefore, having a robust instrument for assessing fear of COVID-19 is important. The present systematic review aimed to synthesize the psychometric evidence evaluated using item response theory (IRT) on the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). Methods: Utilizing the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, four academic databases (Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, and ISI Web of Knowledge) were used to search target papers. Keywords used for search were "Fear of COVID-19 Scale" and its abbreviation (ie, "FCV-19S") and IRT-related terms. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist was then applied to evaluate the methodological quality of the reviewed papers. Moreover, psychometric properties using IRT methods were synthesized using a qualitative method. Results: The initial search resulted in 552 papers (73 duplicates) and 479 were screened based on their titles and abstracts. Finally, 16 papers were included for review regarding their methodological quality (via COSMIN) to synthesize the psychometric evidence for FCV-19S. The 16 papers included 21 countries with 16 language versions of FCV-19S. Conclusion: All the psychometric evidence indicated that the seven items in the FCV-19S fit with the concept of fear. The FCV-19S is a strong and valid instrument for assessing fear across different languages. The seven items in the FCV-19S appear to be unidimensional in assessing fear, which indicates that all items are necessary in the FCV-19S.

  • 7.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran..
    Ohayon, Maurice M.
    Stanford Univ, Stanford Sleep Epidemiol Res Ctr SSERC, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Dept Psychol, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran..
    Fear of COVID-19 and its association with mental health-related factors: systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: BJPsych Open, E-ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e73Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The severity of COVID-19 remains high worldwide. Therefore, millions of individuals are likely to suffer from fear of COVID-19 and related mental health factors. Aims The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize empirical evidence to understand fear of COVID-19 and its associations with mental health-related problems during this pandemic period. Method Relevant studies were searched for on five databases (Scopus, ProQuest, EMBASE, PubMed Central, and ISI Web of Knowledge), using relevant terms (COVID-19-related fear, anxiety, depression, mental health-related factors, mental well-being and sleep problems). All studies were included for analyses irrespective of their methodological quality, and the impact of quality on pooled effect size was examined by subgroup analysis. Results The meta-analysis pooled data from 91 studies comprising 88 320 participants (mean age 38.88 years; 60.66% females) from 36 countries. The pooled estimated mean of fear of COVID-19 was 13.11 (out of 35), using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale. The associations between fear of COVID-19 and mental health-related factors were mostly moderate (Fisher's z = 0.56 for mental health-related factors; 0.54 for anxiety; 0.42 for stress; 0.40 for depression; 0.29 for sleep problems and -0.24 for mental well-being). Methodological quality did not affect these associations. Conclusions Fear of COVID-19 has associations with various mental health-related factors. Therefore, programmes for reducing fear of COVID-19 and improving mental health are needed.

  • 8.
    Chen, I-Hua
    et al.
    Qufu Normal Univ, Chinese Acad Educ Big Data, Qufu, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Chao-Ying
    Chang Gung Univ, Sch Phys Therapy, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Univ, Coll Med, Grad Inst Rehabil Sci, Taoyuan, Taiwan..
    Liu, Chieh-Hsiu
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Res Ctr Clin Med, Dept Geriatr & Gerontol, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Chen, Yu-Pin
    Taipei Med Univ, Wan Fang Hosp, Dept Orthoped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan.;Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med, Sch Med, Dept Orthoped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Kuo, Yi-Jie
    Taipei Med Univ, Wan Fang Hosp, Dept Orthoped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan.;Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med, Sch Med, Dept Orthoped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Wang, Shu-Mei
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Internet addiction and psychological distress among Chinese schoolchildren before and during the COVID-19 outbreak: A latent class analysis2021In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 731-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The present longitudinal study examined the changes in problematic internet use (problematic smartphone use, problematic social media use, and problematic gaming) and changes in COVID-19-related psychological distress (fear of COVID-19 and worry concerning COVID-19) across three time-points (before the COVID-19 outbreak, during the initial stages of the COVID-19 outbreak, and during the COVID-19 outbreak recovery period). Methods: A total of 504 Chinese schoolchildren completed measures concerning problematic internet use and psychological distress across three time points. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify participants into three groups of problematic internet use comprising Group 1 (lowest level), Group 2 (moderate level), and Group 3 (highest level). Results: Statistical analyses showed that as problematic use of internet-related activities declined among Group 3 participants across the three time points, participants in Group 1 and Group 2 had increased problematic use of internet-related activities. Although there was no between-group difference in relation to worrying concerning COVID-19 infection, Groups 2 and 3 had significantly higher levels of fear of COVID-19 than Group 1 during the COVID-19 recovery period. Regression analysis showed that change in problematic internet use predicted fear of COVID-19 during the recovery period. Conclusion: The varied levels of problematic internet use among schoolchildren reflect different changing trends of additive behaviors during COVID-19 outbreak and recovery periods.

  • 9.
    Chen, I-Hua
    et al.
    Minnan Normal Univ, Zhangzhou, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Chao-Ying
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Nottingham, England..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Internet-Related Behaviors and Psychological Distress Among Schoolchildren During COVID-19 School Suspension2020In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 1099-1102Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Chen, I-Hua
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Education Big Data, Qufu Normal University, Qufu City, Shandong, China.
    Chen, Chao-Ying
    School of Physical Therapy and Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, No. 259, Taoyuan City, Taiwan.
    Zhao, Ke-Yun
    School of Communication, Qufu Normal University, Rizhao City, Shandong, China.
    Gamble, Jeffrey H.
    Department of Foreign Languages, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Biostatistics Consulting Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science.
    Psychometric evaluation of fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) among Chinese primary and middle schoolteachers, and their students2023In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, p. 12557-12573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing a large-scale cross-sectional survey, the present study tested the advanced psychometric properties of Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) in specific populations (i.e., primary and middle schoolteachers, and their students). The present study also examined the association between perceived fear of COVID-19 and psychological distress among home-room teachers (i.e., teachers who teach all their students in one classroom all day) and their students. The results among participants (11,134 teachers and 4,335 students) indicated good internal reliability of FCV-19S and excellent factorial validity with a two-factor structure utilizing these specific populations. Furthermore, the multilevel analysis showed that home-room teachers' psychological distress, but not fear of COVID-19, was positively associated with their students. In sum, the FCV-19S is a useful tool to assess the fear of COVID-19 on potentially vulnerable populations (i.e., primary/middle schoolteachers and their students). Future studies are encouraged to use the present study's findings to investigate possible underlying mechanisms for developing effective coping strategies and interventions.

  • 11.
    Fan, Chia-Wei
    et al.
    AdventHlth Univ, Dept Occupat Therapy, Orlando, FL 32803 USA..
    Chang, Kun-Chia
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Gen Psychiat, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan 71742, Taiwan..
    Lee, Kuan-Ying
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan 71742, Taiwan..
    Yang, Wen-Chi
    E DA Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Hematol & Med Oncol, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan.;I Shou Univ, Coll Med, Fac Sch Med, Kaohsiung 84001, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Yale Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.;Connecticut Mental Hlth Ctr, New Haven, CT 06519 USA.;Connecticut Council Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT 06109 USA.;Yale Sch Med, Child Study Ctr, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.;Yale Univ, Dept Neurosci, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.;Yale Univ, Wu Tsai Inst, New Haven, CT 06510 USA..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan 70403, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan 70101, Taiwan..
    Rasch Modeling and Differential Item Functioning of the Self-Stigma Scale-Short Version among People with Three Different Psychiatric Disorders2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 14, article id 8843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-stigma is prevalent in individuals with psychiatric disorders and can profoundly affect people. A unified assessment with sound psychometric properties is needed for evaluating self-stigma across psychiatric conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Self-Stigma Scale-Short version (SSS-S) using Rasch modeling. Six-hundred and twelve participants with substance use disorders (n = 319), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 100), and schizophrenia (n = 193) completed the SSS-S. Rasch results confirmed the unidimensionality of the nine items of the SSS-S. The four-point Likert scale of the SSS-S reflected monotonical increases along the self-stigma continuum. No ceiling or floor effects were detected. Among the three subdomains of the SSS-S, cognitive items appeared to be the most robustly endorsed, and behavioral items were the least endorsed. Two items in the SSS-S displayed differential item functioning across the three diagnoses. Additionally, SSS-S scores showed weak to moderate correlation with depression, anxiety, and stress scale scores. The SSS-S had overall satisfactory psychometric properties. Healthcare professionals may use this assessment to assess self-stigma in multiple psychiatric groups, and information gained may facilitate improved care.

  • 12.
    Huang, Wen-Yi
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Jianan Psychiatric Center, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Chen, Shu-Ping
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    The Mediation Role of Self-Esteem for Self-Stigma on Quality of Life for People With Schizophrenia: A Retrospectively Longitudinal Study2018In: Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology, ISSN 1834-4909, Vol. 12, article id e10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Among patients with schizophrenia, there is evidence of a negative association between self-stigma and subjective quality of life (SQoL), and self-esteem was an important mediator in the association. We attempted to use a longitudinal study to investigate the aforementioned mediation on a sample with schizophrenia.

    Methods: We used longitudinal data retrieved from medical records of a psychiatric centre between June 2014 and December 2015. In the data, we retrieved information of self-stigma using the Self-Stigma Scale - Short; SQoL, using the WHO questionnaire on the Quality of Life - Short Form; and self-esteem, using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. All the measures were evaluated five times. Linear mixed-effect models accompanied by Sobel tests were used to tackle the mediating effects.

    Results: Data from 74 patients (57 males) with schizophrenia were eligible for analysis; their mean (SD) age was 39.53 (10.67); mean age of onset was 22.95 (8.38). Self-esteem was a mediator for patients in physical (p = .039), psychological (p = .003), and social SQoL (p = .004), but not in environment SQoL (p = .051).

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, mental health professionals could tailor different programs to patients with schizophrenia, such as self-stigma reduction and self-esteem improvement programs. However, treatment as a whole should be sensitive to both self-stigma and self-esteem. Also, we should consider individuals' health and wellbeing from social perspectives of disability rather than the medical model of disability emphasising symptoms and medications.

  • 13.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    et al.
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Hou, Wen-Li
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Nursing, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Med Res, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Mamun, Mohammed A.
    Ctr Hlth Innovat Networking Training Act & Res Ba, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Aparecido da Silva, Jose
    Univ Sao Paulo, Unit Psychobiol, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Broche-Perez, Yunier
    Univ Cent Marta Abreu Las Villas, Psychol Dept, Km 5 1-2, Santa Clara, Cuba..
    Ullah, Irfan
    Gandhara Univ, Kabir Med Coll, Peshawar, Pakistan..
    Masuyama, Akihiro
    Iryo Sosei Univ, Fac Psychol, Iwaki, Fukushima, Japan..
    Wakashima, Koubun
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Educ, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan..
    Mailliez, Melody
    Univ Fed Toulouse Midi Pyrenees, Univ Toulouse, ISAE SUPAERO Inst Super Aeronaut & Espace, Toulouse, France..
    Carre, Arnaud
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, Univ Savoie Mt Blanc, LIP PC2S, Chambery, France..
    Chen, Yu-Pin
    Taipei Med Univ, Wan Fang Hosp, Dept Orthped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan.;Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med, Sch Med, Dept Orthped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Chang, Kun-Chia
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;NanHua Univ, Dept Nat Biotechnol, Chiayi, Taiwan..
    Kuo, Yi-Jie
    Taipei Med Univ, Wan Fang Hosp, Dept Orthped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan.;Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med, Sch Med, Dept Orthped Surg, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Soraci, Paolo
    Grp Cognit Behav Psychol Assoc, Rome, Italy..
    Scarf, Damian
    Univ Otago, Dept Psychol, Dunedin, New Zealand..
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychology Dept, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Shahid Bahounar BLV, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) across countries: Measurement invariance issues2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 1892-1908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The threats of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have caused fears worldwide. The Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) was recently developed to assess the fear of COVID-19. Although many studies found that the FCV-19S is psychometrically sound, it is unclear whether the FCV-19S is invariant across countries. The present study aimed to examine the measurement invariance of the FCV-19S across eleven countries.

    Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Using data collected from prior research on Bangladesh (N = 8,550), United Kingdom (N = 344), Brazil (N = 1,843), Taiwan (N = 539), Italy (N = 249), New Zealand (N = 317), Iran (N = 717), Cuba (N = 772), Pakistan (N = 937), Japan (N = 1,079) and France (N = 316), comprising a total 15,663 participants, the present study used the multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch differential item functioning (DIF) to examine the measurement invariance of the FCV-19S across country, gender and age (children aged below 18 years, young to middle-aged adults aged between 18 and 60 years, and older people aged above 60 years).

    Results: The unidimensional structure of the FCV-19S was confirmed. Multigroup CFA showed that FCV-19S was partially invariant across country and fully invariant across gender and age. DIF findings were consistent with the findings from multigroup CFA. Many DIF items were displayed for country, few DIF items were displayed for age, and no DIF items were displayed for gender.

    Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the FCV-19S is a good psychometric instrument to assess fear of COVID-19 during the pandemic period. Moreover, the use of FCV-19S is supported in at least ten countries with satisfactory psychometric properties.

  • 14.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Imani, Vida
    Tabriz Univ Med Sci, Pediat Hlth Res Ctr, Tabriz, Iran..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Shahid Bahonar Blvd, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran.;Jonkoping Univ, Dept Nursing, Sch Hlth & Welf, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Psychometric Properties of the Persian Generalized Trust Scale: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Models and Relationship with Quality of Life, Happiness, and Depression2021In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, ISSN 1557-1874, E-ISSN 1557-1882, Vol. 19, p. 1854-1865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The psychometric properties of the Generalized Trust Scale (GTS) are well established. Furthermore, previous studies have found that the GTS is positively associated with better mental health and lower distress, and the literature finds that trust is good for mental health. However, current literature does not have any psychometric evidence concerning the Persian GTS. This study translated the GTS into Persian and validated its psychometric properties. After translating the GTS into Persian using robust and standardized translation procedure, 1200 Iranians (mean age = 34.83 years; 583 [48.6%] males) completed the GTS, along with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Short Form-12 (SF-12), and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire Short Form (OHQ-SF). The factor structure of Persian GTS was confirmed by a unidimensional model with a method factor (comparative fit index = 0.998; Tucker-Lewis index = 0.992). The unidimensional model was also supported by Rasch analysis (mean square = 0.75 to 1.31). Other properties of the Persian GTS were satisfactory. More specifically, test-retest reliability was good (intraclass correlational coefficient = 0.865), internal consistency was good (alpha = 0.881), and concurrent validity was supported (standardized beta = - 0.086 with depression in the HADS [p = 0.045]; = - 0.162 with anxiety in the HADS [p < 0.001]; = 0.077 with mental component score in the SF-12 [p = 0.044]; = 0.624 with OHQ-SF [p < 0.001]). The six-item Persian GTS has promising psychometric properties and can be an effective measure to assess trust among Iranians.

  • 15.
    Poon, Lok Y. J.
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Tsang, Hector W. H.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Mental Hlth Res Ctr, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Chan, Tsan Y. J.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Man, Sze W. T.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Ng, Lok Y.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Wong, Yi L. E.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, 1 Univ Rd, Tainan 701, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Chien, Chi-Wen
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Dept Psychol, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Pontes, Halley M.
    Birkbeck Univ London, Dept Org Psychol, London, England..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Psychometric Properties of the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale-Short-Form (IGDS9-SF): Systematic Review2021In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 23, no 10, article id e26821Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale-Short-Form (IGDS9-SF) is among the best with regard to its psychometric properties. Therefore, clinical psychologists are likely guided to use the IGDS9-SF if they want to assess or screen the disordered gaming in their practice. However, the information, especially psychometric evidence, concerning the IGDS9-SF has not been fully examined and summarized. Objective: This systematic review evaluated the psychometric properties of different language versions of the IGDS9-SF and assessed its methodological quality in order to improve the clinicians' understanding of the IGDS9-SF and facilitate its use. Methods: Systematic literature searches were carried out using Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science. The review included English-language studies of any research design that have reported at least one psychometric property of the IGDS9-SF, as defined by the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstrument (COSMIN), and have aimed at testing the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF. Results: In total, 21 studies comprising 15 language versions of the IGDS9-SF were included. Overall, the IGDS9-SF showed adequate internal consistency (although some items did not have satisfactory item-total correlation [IT]), excellent criterion validity, and the ability to distinguish different subgroups with measurement invariance being supported across gender and age. In terms of factor structure, the IGDS9-SF was shown to have a unidimensional factor structure across all 21 studies. Conclusions: Although there is insufficient evidence regarding the responsiveness and properties of the IGDS9-SF using item response theory, the existing evidence supports its use in assessing disordered gaming among individuals.

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