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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Lunds universitet.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Chalmers.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Svenska handelshögskolan i Helsingfors.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Rehn, Alf
    Åbo Akademi.
    Segerstedt, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Öhman, Peter
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Industriell ekonomi och organisering2016Book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sannö, A.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Sustainable production in surface treatment SMEs: an explorative study of challenges and enablers from the CEOs perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Conceptual sustainable production principles in practice: Do they reflect what companies do?2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 141, 693-701 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common understanding of sustainable production principles and the identification of sustainable manufacturing practices among practitioners are key starting points in studying how manufacturers are making their operations more sustainable. However, there is a lack of insight in the literature connecting conceptual sustainable production principles, and the practices reflecting these principles. Using semi-structured interviews founded on the sustainable production principles posed by the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, this paper presents an outlook of how companies in different industries carry out manufacturing practices related to the sustainability production principles. Results showed that the majority of sustainable manufacturing practices remain strongly centered on the environmental dimension of sustainability, with the greatest number of practices emanating from principles concerning energy and material conservation, and waste management. Similarly, reactive sustainable manufacturing practices prevailed over proactive sustainable manufacturing practices, as most of the practices aimed to comply with regulatory and market pressures. Quality and environmental management systems were acknowledged as important tools for putting sustainable production principles into practice; while Swedish environmental and social regulations were found to drive sustainable manufacturing practices. This study connects sustainable production principles with sustainable manufacturing practices and opens the way for further studies on a global or sector-specific scale.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-12 00:00
  • 4.
    Alayón, Claudia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Implementation of sustainable production principles within Swedish manufacturers2014In: Proceedings of The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014, Göteborg: Chalmers university , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Both, a common understanding on sustainable production principles and the identification of sustainable production practices within manufacturers constitute key starting points when the aim is to study how Swedish manufacturers are working towards sustainable production. Using an interview guide based on the sustainable production principles by the Lowell Center of Sustainable Production (LCSP), this paper provides an overview of how Swedish manufacturers comply with these set of principles.

  • 5. Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Andersson, Carin
    Muhammad, Abid
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Achieving Sustainable Production through Increased Utilization of Production Resources2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Brunoe, Thomas Ditlev
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Kjeld
    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Towards a generic design method for reconfigurable manufacturing systems: Analysis and synthesis of current design methods and evaluation of supportive tools2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 42, 179-195 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's global manufacturing environment, changes are inevitable and something that every manufacturer must respond to and take advantage of, whether it is in regards to technology changes, product changes, or changes in the manufacturing processes. The reconfigurable manufacturing system (RMS) meets this challenge through the ability to rapidly and efficiently change capacity and functionality, which is the reason why it has been widely labelled the manufacturing paradigm of the future. However, design of the RMS represents a significant challenge compared to the design of traditional manufacturing systems, as it should be designed for efficient production of multiple variants, as well as multiple product generations over its lifetime. Thus, critical decisions regarding the degree of scalability and convertibility of the system must be considered in the design phase, which affects the abilities to reconfigure the system in accordance with changes during its operating lifetime. However, in current research it is indicated that conventional manufacturing system design methods do not support the design of an RMS and that a systematic RMS design method is lacking, despite the fact that numerous contributions exist. Moreover, there is currently only limited evidence for the breakthrough of reconfigurability in industry. Therefore, the research presented in this paper aims at synthesizing current contributions into a generic method for RMS design. Initially, currently available design methods for RMS are reviewed, in terms of classifying and comparing their content, structure, and scope, which leads to a synthesis of the reviewed methods into a generic design method. In continuation of this, the paper includes a discussion of practical implications related to carrying out the design, including an identification of potential challenges and an assessment of which tools that can be applied to support the design. Conclusively, further areas for research are indicated, which provides valuable knowledge of how to develop and realize the benefits of reconfigurability in industry. 

  • 7.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Reconfigurable Manufacturing - An Enabler for a Production System Portfolio Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, 139-144 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the development of a strategically integrated product and production system portfolio could be enabled by the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing. In previous research, several critical challenges related to developing production system portfolios have been identified, but it has not been investigated how developing a reconfigurable manufacturing concept could aid some of these. Therefore, through a multiple case study, these critical challenges have been investigated in two companies that have recently developed reconfigurable manufacturing concepts for multiple variants and generations of products. The findings reveal that the companies need to deal with several challenges in order to enable a functioning RMS. By running the project separately from the NPD project and to include several product types and production sites the company overcome several challenges. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean implementation in geriatric care in a municipal: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, S4-87-S4-99 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented at geriatric care in a municipal department in Sweden, focusing on the experiences and challenges of the employees, together with the strengths and weaknesses of the lean philosophy.

    Design/methodology/approach: The primary method used was a case study with interviews and observations on spot, in combination with a literature study. All with the intention of defining and describing lean, its value, and how organizations generally apply lean.

    Findings: All sources of information have shown that there are many advantages with lean such as better communication and a better-organized workplace. In addition, lean tools help to eliminate non-value adding activities (waste). However, implementations also bring about issues and challenges such as the difficulty of creating a long lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups and the decreasing demand for lean from the executives have been the main issues within the geriatric care. The next step might be to create a common organizational culture, which is permeated with continuous improvements, focusing on value-adding activities for the residents and others stakeholders.

    Originality/value: Very few studies have addressed lean implementation in geriatric care as well as in a municipal department.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Lean implementation in the geriatric care sector in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage (IJSSCA), ISSN 1479-2494, E-ISSN 1479-2753, Vol. 9, no 1, 56-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented in the geriatric care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The research focuses on implementation experiences and challenges encountered. The research method used is a case study using interviews and observations for data collection. The findings indicate that there are many advantages of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as better communication, organisation and workflow. The lean implementation worked as an eye-opener and created a situation, where the employees realised a great deal of waste in the daily operations. In addition, lean tools helped to reduce the waste. The findings also indicate that there are some challenges of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as the difficulty to create long-lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups, decreasing interest from senior management and lack of a holistic view were the main issues in the case organisation.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Business Unit Networks, Microwave and Access Supply, Ericsson, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Department of Industrial Management, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 114, no 6, 904-921 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to elaborate, how the use of a joint-use strategy of Lean and Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, and agility. Telecom manufacturing has been under tremendous change after dot.com bubble burst in the early 2000, and new competition has originated from Asia. Being successful requires now more than before, and joint-use of strategies is one option to survive.

    Design/methodology/approach – A single case study from a Swedish company operating in the telecom manufacturing was conducted. In particular, a Six Sigma project was followed and analyzed during 2002. However, the outcome of the Six Sigma project has been studied in longitudinal manner until 2014.

    Findings – The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today's highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications – This study is limited to large company that usually has a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis as well as has level of control of the supply chain operations. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies and thus it may be more difficult to realize the Lean Six Sigma strategy in such environment. On the other hand, the processes in these companies are often less complex.

    Practical implications – This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes as well as how to perform a Six Sigma project in Lean environment, in a proper manner.

    Originality/value – This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy. The paper will also serve as a basis for other companies and industries, on how to survive in difficult times.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Ericsson AB, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, S1-128-S1-140 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim is to examine if the joint-use strategy of Lean Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, cost-efficiency, and agility at the same time.

    Design/methodology/approach: A single case study including a Swedish company from the telecom manufacturing industry was conducted.

    Findings: A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications: This study is limited to large companies that usually have a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies.

    Practical implications: This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes.

    Originality/value: This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lantz, Björn
    Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Total productive maintenance in support processes: an enabler for operation excellence2015In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 9-10, 1042-1055 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to stay competitive in today's marketplace, it is vital to reduce activities that do not create value. Lean production has in the last decade been seen as a philosophy to reduce non-value time. The office environment often presents a major improvement opportunity to reduce non-value time. Lean contributes positively to business performance applied in a manufacturing context and is also suggested to do the same in a service context. The purpose of the paper is to analyse and determine how total productive maintenance (TPM) can be applied within the support process and to identify effects from an employee and business perspective. A case study has been performed and a qualitative research approach was selected. Empirical data were gathered by using semi-structured interviews at one case company, but from several teams that had applied TPM. The result was then used as an inductive approach to explore how TPM can be applied in a support process. To implement and apply TPM within an office context, it should be structured in three steps (i) define, (ii) implement and (iii) sustain. TPM should be conducted as a part of the ordinary day-to-day work. The planning and discussions connected to TPM can be included in regular daily departmental stand-up meetings' involving everybody. The work with 5S and maintenance should also be a part of the TPM structure, connecting it as a system and not as an isolated activity. TPM can create value from both a business and an employee perspective. In the employee perspective, TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business perspective, objectives such as cost and quality are improved, but TPM also enables the reduction of waste.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Svensson, Victor
    University of Skövde.
    Preventive maintenance is an enabler for operation excellence in support processes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TPM in a Lean office environment can create values both in a business and an employee dimension. In the employee dimension TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business dimension objectives such as cost, quality and supporting the reduction of waste improved. Preventive maintenance meetings can be included and performed once a month in the ordinary departmental “stand-up meetings”. Methods like 5S, which need to be updated on a continuous basis, and standardized maintenance should also be connected to the TPM work. But first all employees should be trained in order to have the same direction/behavior.

  • 14.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 15. Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Guinery, Jane
    Nottingham University Business School.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    The Unsung Contribution of Production Planners and Schedulers at Production and Sales Interfaces2011In: Behavioral Operations in Planning and Scheduling / [ed] Jan C. Fransoo, Toni Wäfler, John R. Wilson, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, 47-81 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping university.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    New ways of organizing product introductions2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no supplement 1, 4856-4861 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe and reflect on an interactive research approach used to address the challenges on how to improve product introductions, the part of the product realization process associated with the transfer of a product from product development to serial production. In the interactive research approach, research results as well as improvement of practice are given equal importance. The collaboration between researchers and practitioners therefore addresses both the focus and the process of the change. The approach includes four main iterative steps: 1) mapping/diagnosis, 2) feedback of results, 3) participation in development activities, and 4) follow-up/evaluation. The paper reports findings from interactive research in one company within office product industry and one company group, consisting of three company units within the engine industry. Preliminary findings indicate that the participating companies afterwards work in a more structured way with product introductions and that the employees have gained deeper knowledge about product introductions as well as experienced the advantages of working across functional boundaries. Furthermore, the interactive research approach is suitable to run projects from an ergonomics perspective as it focuses on developing both practice and theory, it is human-centered, and it emphasizes broad participation from practitioners.

  • 17.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Karltun, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Towards Understanding and Managing the Learning Process in Mail Sorting2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no 2, 115-126 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This paper was based on case study research at the Swedish Mail Service Division and it addresses learning time to sort mail at new districts and means to support the learning process on an individual as well as organizational level.

    Participants: The study population consisted of 46 postmen and one team leader in the Swedish Mail Service Division.

    Methods: Data were collected through measurements of time for mail sorting, interviews and a focus group.

    Results: The study showed that learning to sort mail was a much more complex process and took more time than expected by management. Means to support the learning process included clarification of the relationship between sorting and the topology of the district, a good work environment, increased support from colleagues and management, and a thorough introduction for new postmen.

    Conclusions: The identified means to support the learning process require an integration of human, technological and organizational aspects. The study further showed that increased operations flexibility cannot be reinforced without a systems perspective and thorough knowledge about real work activities and that ergonomists can aid businesses to acquire this knowledge.

  • 18.
    Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Proceedings of the 36th Encontro Nacional de Engenharia de Produção, João Pessoa, 3-6 October, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O desenvolvimento de produtos (DP) abrange muitas atividades que devem ser executadas por profissionais de diferentes áreas, cada uma vendo o produto de uma perspectiva diferente, mas de forma complementar (ROZENFELD et al., 2006). Há uma vvertente pouco explorada na literatura sobre esse tema que estuda os pontos de contato, ou seja, as atividades que requerem integração para serem realizadas. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste artigo é caracterizar a integração interfuncional em pontos de contato presentes no DP no setor agroindustrial. Foram entrevistados 10 funcionários de duas empresas multinacionais produtoras de sementes que participavam de diversas fases dos processos de DP, sendo que foi possível obter opiniões sobre as características das fases: inicial, intermediária e final. Através da interpretação dos resultados foi possível criar um modelo próprio para explicar as fases do DP, e quais funções atuam em cada uma das fases. Observou-se que dependendo da área que a pessoa trabalha, ela participa somente de determinadas fases, diminuindo seu conhecimento sobre as fases posteriores e vice versa. Não tendo visão multidimensional, que envolve integração interfuncional, as fases do DP e os objetivos das atividades de DP, podem ocorrer conflitos que prejudicam o desenvolvimento como um todo. Isso ocorre, porque muitas vezes dentro de cada fase tem uma equipe formada de diferentes funções integradas, que possuem uma alta integração, porém na passagem de fases, muda-se a equipe e há uma baixa integração, entre as funções da equipe anterior e a equipe subsequente.

  • 19.
    Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Universidade Federal de Viçosa.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Organizações Rurais & Agroindustriais, ISSN 1517-3879, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development (PD) includes many activities that must be performed by professionals from different areas, with a pluralist and complimentary perspective. The existing literature presents an important subject that is poorly explored: the points of contact, that is, activities that require cross-functional integration to be carried out. Thus, the purpose of this study is to characterize the cross-functional integration in the points of contact points of seed development processes, in the agricultural industry. We interviewed 10 employees representing different stages of the PD process, of two multinational seed companies. Based on this it was possible to obtain opinions on the characteristics of the stages: initial, intermediate and final. Through the interpretation of the results, it was possible to create a framework with the following dimensions: cross-functional integration, PD phases, and PD objectives. Depending on the area where the employee works, he/she participated only in a particular phase, decreasing his/her knowledge of the subsequent phases and vice versa. Thus, they do not have a multidimensional view of the PD process, which can be a source of conflicts in the PD process as a whole. There are also cases where, within a given phase, there is a high integration level between functions, however, when the process reaches the next phase, there is a low integration level between the functions of previous and subsequent stages.

  • 20.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013), Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2013, 489-494 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 21.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    A Lewinian approach to managing barriers to university–industry collaboration2017In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management and industry to increase university–industry (U–I) collaboration to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too complex to be tackled within one sector alone. Researchers are often expected to realise these ideas, but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers to accomplishing this. The paper presents an empirical study of researchers’ view on U–I collaboration. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers to collaboration from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study, which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on U–I collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we discuss hindering forces on the individual, intra- and interorganisational levels. In total, we find 18 key areas to identify possible hinders for collaboration and based on a Lewinian perspective, we suggest that removing hindering forces can benefit U–I collaboration. The paper recognises the need to regard universities as equal partners in U–I collaboration for sustainable knowledge production.

  • 22.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Barriers to managing knowledge and learning in university: Industry cooperation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls are made by governments, university management, and industry to increase university–industry cooperation to find solutions for societal and economic problems that are too large and complex to be tackled within one sector alone. These actors want to stimulate knowledge development and learning in university – industry cooperation to achieve innovation and growth. Researchers are often expected to take charge for realizing these ideas but when it comes to everyday research and knowledge development, individuals may encounter barriers for doing this. In this paper, we present an empirical study of researchers’ view on university – industry cooperation. Our focus in the analysis, inspired by the Lewinian field theory, is on the hindering forces that might create barriers for cooperation from a researcher’s perspective. Contrary to the previously used approaches taken in force field analysis, we perform a qualitative study which might be better suited for this framework. In the literature on cooperation and collaboration, ‘orientation-related’ and ‘transaction-related’ barriers have been identified. In our analysis, we also find other hindering forces related to person-task fit, identity, career and resources. These barriers are found on the individual and societal level, in addition to the previous two categories that are on the organizational level.

  • 23.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University.
    Creating a competitive edge when designing production systems: facilitating the sharing of design information2012In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1454, Vol. 4, no 3-4, 257-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing production systems, design information must be shared among functions at the manufacturing company and the external equipment supplier in order to integrate the various work activities. In this paper, factors facilitating the sharing of design information are analysed based on an in-depth case study of a supplier in the automotive industry. First, our findings show that the sharing of design information is promoted by formalisation. Second, informal coordination mechanisms are more crucial for internal integration between specialised functions than for external integration with the equipment supplier. Finally, our findings indicate that personal and language barriers appear more difficult to overcome than organisational bounds or geographical distance. Altogether, the findings provide strong evidence for the importance of sharing design information when designing more sophisticated production systems.

  • 24.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University.
    Design information for efficient equipment supplier/buyer integration2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, 484-502 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying design information and success factors for production equipment acquisition, in order to support the design of high-performance production systems.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research strategy employed was an in-depth case study of an industrialization project, together with a questionnaire of 25 equipment suppliers.

    Findings – The study provides the reader with an insight into the role of design information when acquiring production equipment by addressing questions such as: What type of information is used? How do equipment suppliers obtain information? What factors facilitate a smooth production system acquisition?

    Research limitations/implications – Limitations are primarily associated with the chosen research methodology, which requires further empirical studies to establish a generic value.

    Practical implications – The implications are that manufacturing companies have to transfer various types of design information with respect to the content and kind of information. More attention has to be placed on what information is transferred to ensure that equipment suppliers receive all the information needed to design and subsequently build the production equipment. To facilitate integration of equipment suppliers, manufacturing companies should appoint a contact person who can gather, understand and transform relevant design information.

    Originality/value – External integration of equipment suppliers in production system design by means of design information is an area that has been rarely addressed in academia and industry.

  • 25.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bellgran, Monica
    The critical role of design information for improved equipment supplier integration during production system design2011In: Proceedings of the 44th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acquisition of production equipment is one step of the production system design process. When design and building of production equipment is handed over to an equipment supplier, higher requirements are placed on the design information exchange to secure that the equipment corresponds to technical and financial requirements of the buying company. The paper presents results on characteristics of design information exchanged and success factors for effective collaboration between equipment suppliers and manufacturing companies. Results are based on an in-depth case study at a Swedish manufacturing company and a survey of 25 equipment suppliers.  

  • 26.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Angelis, Jannis
    Information Management for Production System Design with a New Portfolio Approach2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Production Research: Innovation in Product and Production, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective management of information is vital for successful development of new products. However, knowledge is lacking about the management of information during production system design and its effects on innovation. This exploratory case study in the automotive industry furthers understanding of how management of information contributes to the design of robust and dynamic production systems that can handle changing production situations. The results from the case study indicate that the management of information should consider requirements of current and future production system generations facilitating a conscious planning of a production systems portfolio that corresponds to the product portfolio. This approach allows for new ways of designing production system concepts and production technology solutions, which also can accelerate the innovation capabilities of the manufacturing company.

  • 27.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Dual Perspective on information exchange between design and manufacturing2011In: Proceedings of Iced11: Design Information and Knowledge, Vol. 6, Glasgow Design Society , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the exchange of information between the design and manufacturing interface from both perspectives in order to ensure interdepartmental integration and improve the performance of new product development projects. Based on two in-depth case studies, this article illustrates that there are differences in the type of information transferred between design and manufacturing as well as how this information is shared. While design engineers ask for feedback to their work regarding both the product and the project, relies the production system designer heavily on feed-forward information concerning the product per se. For effective new product development, it seems however beneficial that design engineers also should give feedback to the production system concept. The implication is that project managers need to carefully consider how to improve the sharing of information upstream in new product development projects and what communication medium to apply to transfer the information between design and manufacturing.

  • 28.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    User-supplier integration throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment2014In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As production equipment is often designed and built by equipment suppliers rather than made in-house, a collaborative buyer-supplier-relationship could be utilized in order to create robust solutions and enhance innovative ideas. The purpose with this paper is to explore critical user-supplier collaboration activities throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment development. The purpose is accomplished by a literature review and a case study including more than 30 semi-structured interviews at four companies. The challenges vary depending on equipment life cycle phase and user/supplier perspective. A life cycle model with eight stages is proposed including critical interconnected activities for each stage.

  • 29.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    User-supplier collaboration in production equipment development – a lifecycle perspective2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to refine existing theories on collaboration between users and suppliers in joint production equipment development projects by exploring critical collaboration activities throughout the lifecycle stages of the production equipment. By means of a literature review and a multiple case study of two equipment suppliers and two users, a lifecycle perspective on production equipment development is adopted. Our results show that collaboration intensity depends on the specific lifecycle stage of the production equipment. The contributions of this paper are illustrated in a developed lifecycle model in order to facilitate practitioners in organising critical collaboration activities.

  • 30.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University.
    In search for improved decision making on manufacturing footprint: A conceptual model for information handling2011In: Proceedings of the 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, 2011, 63-68 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The footprint strategy of a manufacturing company is frequently highlighted as a key aspect to the company’s competitive advantage. However, research concerning international location decisions is limited. A comprehensive strategy has to function in a world with limited resources and continuous change of values.  The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of the process for efficient production localisation decisions by integrating aspects influencing the design of the manufacturing footprint. Research on drivers for location of manufacturing emphasise input factors, market factors and technological knowhow as key factors. Looking at the entire industrial system, earlier research also illustrates the broad range of roles for the manufacturing plant within a company’s industrial system. Based upon this discussion of the motive for manufacturing location and the strategic role of the manufacturing plant, a conceptual model is introduced emphasising different levels that should be considered during the process of preparing a localisation decision. It serves as a base for more detailed studies on specific aspects, models and factors for manufacturing footprint analysis.

  • 31.
    Burnett, Susan
    et al.
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Mendel, Peter
    Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA.
    Nunes, Francisco
    Lisbon University Institute, Portugal.
    Wiig, Siri
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    van den Bovenkamp, Hester
    Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Karltun, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Robert, Glenn
    King’s College London, UK.
    Anderson, Janet
    King’s College London, UK.
    Vincent, Charles
    Oxford University, UK.
    Fulop, Naomi
    University College London, UK.
    Using institutional theory to analyse hospital responses to external demands for finance and quality in five European countries2016In: Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, ISSN 1355-8196, E-ISSN 1758-1060, Vol. 21, no 2, 109-117 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Given the impact of the global economic crisis, delivering better health care with limited finance grows more challenging. Through the lens of institutional theory, this paper explores pressures experienced by hospital leaders to improve quality and constrain spending, focusing on how they respond to these often competing demands.

    Methods: An in-depth, multilevel analysis of health care quality policies and practices in five European countries including longitudinal case studies in a purposive sample of ten hospitals.

    Results: How hospitals responded to the financial and quality challenges was dependent upon three factors: the coherence of demands from external institutions; managerial competence to align external demands with an overall quality improvement strategy, and managerial stability. Hospital leaders used diverse strategies and practices to manage conflicting external pressures.

    Conclusions: The development of hospital leaders’ skills in translating external requirements into implementation plans with internal support is a complex, but crucial, task, if quality is to remain a priority during times of austerity. Increasing quality improvement skills within a hospital, developing a culture where quality improvement becomes embedded and linking cost reduction measures to improving care are all required.

  • 32.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    A Method for Customer-driven Purchasing: Aligning Supplier interaction and Customer-driven manufacturing2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of a purchaser has traditionally focused on acquiring standard items at the lowest possible cost. The ability to reduce unit cost has been the key performance indicator for purchasers. Most traditional purchasing strategies thus focus on optimizing this situation, focusing on the supplier interface only and not on customer value. However, for many manufacturing companies, the demand from their customers has changed lately. Not only low‐cost standard products but also customized products and short delivery lead times is increasingly required. In order to contribute to the focal actor’s competitiveness, purchasers need a purchasing strategy that supports customer value creation and thus differentiates between acquiring standard items and acquiring customized items. Accordingly, not only the focal actor’s interaction with the supplier needs to be regarded in the purchasing situation, but also the interaction with the focal actor’s customer. This is defined as customer‐driven purchasing in this research.

    The purpose of this research is to develop knowledge that contributes to increased competitiveness of manufacturing companies. The manufacturer can increase competitiveness by further utilizing knowledge available in manufacturing strategy in the purchasing situation. The main objective of this dissertation is to analyze the competitiveness in customer‐driven purchasing and to develop a method for customerdriven purchasing by aligning supplier interaction with customer‐driven manufacturing. The method for customer‐driven purchasing (the CDP method) was developed in collaboration with Combitech AB, Ericsson AB, Fagerhult AB, Husqvarna AB, Parker Hannifin AB, and Siemens Turbomachinery AB. The CDP method consists of three phases, divided into twelve steps. The first phase focuses on identifying strategic lead times and differentiating between varying circumstances for the purchased items. The second phase focuses on analyzing customer‐driven manufacturing while the third phase focuses on analyzing supplier interaction. The method is concluded with the implementation of customer‐driven purchasing.

    When applying the three phases of the CDP method, the case companies have experienced a better alignment between customer expectations and supplier performance since the competitive priorities to pursue in a supplier interaction are identified and taken action upon. Direct visible results of implementing the model are, for example, shortened supply lead time for customized items, and reduced inventory levels for standard items. The CDP method has also helped the companies to identify critical suppliers and how the supplier interaction should be affected by the customer demand for the purchased item. Several indirect results have also been reported, such as, improved internal communication, and a better balance between short supply lead time and low cost. Thus the need to differentiate and balance the goals and key performance indicators for purchasers has become evident. Applying the CDP method has been seen as an important learning process in which the objectives of purchasing and manufacturing are aligned for improved competitiveness. This contributes to establishing purchasing as a strategically important competitive function and to support a holistic view of the focal actor’s competitiveness.

  • 33.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Kunddrivet inköp2013In: Bonnier Ledarskaphandböcker: Inköp & Logistik. Kapitel 4.11. / [ed] Gösta Hultén, Hilda Hultén & Lena Sonne, Stockholm: Bonnier Business Publishing , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Välj rätt nivå av samverkan i kund- och leverantörsrelationer2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Overcoming Contradictions through Cross-functional Integration in an ETO-context2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Engström, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    The lead time tree as a boundary object for developmental learning and improved conditions for purchasers2016In: 5th World P&OM Conference Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contradictions between individuals and different functions in organizations can serve asbasis for a constant challenge which, as it gets responded to and demand is fulfilled, canhelp people to develop and create viable organizations. (Argyris, 1990). Thesecontradictions, handled in an effective way drives, empowers and enables developmentin organizations. In order to get interdisciplinary functions to collaborate collectivelyboundary objects can be useful (Star and Griesemer, 1989). The purpose is toinvestigate if the lead time tree (Bäckstrand, 2012) can be used as a boundary object tosupport knowledge creation process across functional boundaries of purchasing,manufacturing, product development, sales etc.

  • 37.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Jansson, Daniel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Karlsson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Guidelines for designing a purchasing process for small businesses2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose with this paper is to contribute towards a deeper understanding of the purchasing process in SMEs. This is done by investigating general research regarding purchasing, business strategy and SMEs to create a framework of factors influencing purchasing processes in SMEs. The factors are then authenticated with an empirical study of an SME. It is concluded that all influencing factors from the framework can be applied to the SME, but that the SME tend to handle them with a short-term perspective. This paper will provide guidelines for SMEs in order to create purchasing processes with a long-term perspective, which is more integrated with their business strategy.

  • 38.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Customer-driven Purchasing: Empirical applications2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Andersson, Rikard
    Husqvarna AB.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Parker Hannifin AB.
    Kornebäck, Fredrik
    Siemens Turbomachinery AB.
    Ohlson, Nils-Erik
    Siemens Turbomachinery AB.
    Kärnborg, Beatrice
    Combitech AB.
    Malmstedt, Andréas
    Ericsson AB.
    Hjertén, Alexander
    Ericsson AB.
    Spaak, Björn
    Fagerhult AB.
    A method for customer-driven purchasing2013In: Operations Management at the Heart of the Recovery, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Rigor, relevance, funding and qualifications: The catch 22 of University – industry interaction research2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Tiedemann, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Parker Hannifin.
    Skyllt på skylten2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med detta papper är att undersöka hur graden av kundanpassning av ingående komponenter påverkar kostnad och ledtid. För att illustrera denna situation används ett exempel från hydraul pumptillverkaren Parker från när en ingående komponent ändrades från standard till kundunik utan att analysera hur detta påverkade ledtider och leveransförmåga. I pappret visar vi att KDI-metoden som simultant tar hänsyn till strategiska ledtider, grad av kundanpassning och kundorderns position ökar möjligheterna att ta väl underbyggda beslut, att undvika suboptimering och där igenom minska totalkostnaden.

  • 42.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Time-phasing and decoupling points as analytical tools for purchasing2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customization and customer-driven manufacturing are both explicitly based on end-customer relations and customer requirements. The impact of these aspects on internal operations is relatively well known and can be investigated using time phasing and decoupling points. These tools are however rarely used for analyzing purchased material. Based on the time phased product structure, items are categorized according to three criteria: driver, uniqueness, and make/buy. Purchased items can thus be identified using the last criteria and then driver and uniqueness are used as a point of departure for categorizing purchased material. The approach hence provides a platform for development of supplier relations based on the customer requirements which is the core theme of the method for customer-driven purchasing.

  • 43.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Kundorderstyrning och kundanpassning - ett kund- och leverantörsperspektiv2012In: Plans Forsknings- och tillämpningskonferens 2012: Logistik i praktisk tillämpning / [ed] Peter Berling, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44. Cederfeldt, A.
    et al.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Supplier satisfaction: Is there a difference between preferre and non-preferred suppliers?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Chen, C.
    et al.
    Suurmond, R.
    Van Raaij, E.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Purchasing Process Models: Tools for teaching Purchasing and Supply Management2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46. Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Kalmar Industries Supplier Network2012In: Design Structure Matrix Methods and Applications / [ed] Steven D. Eppinger and Tyson R. Browning, MIT Press, 2012, 317-324 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Managing Dynamics in Corporate Networks2014In: World Journal of Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2331-4222, Vol. 2, no 1, 32-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial issue in corporate networks is to identify to what extent different strategic and operational decisions need to be coordinated between the involved companies. In this paper we elaborate on the issue of synchronization of information flow based on interconnectivities between companies in order to coordinate a corporate network by the means of DSM, Dependence Structure Matrix. The results show that DSM can be used to identify interconnectivities among actors in a network and to identify which information that needs to be shared between companies in the network.

  • 48. De Freita, M.R.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M.L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Demand management in the automotive industry: The role of cross-functional integration2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation: a case study at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Industrial Design.
    Design-driven innovation: A literature review2016In: Proceedings of the 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Boston, USA, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
123456 1 - 50 of 255
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