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  • 1.
    Abdelmageed, Mohamed Elnourani
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Skärin, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Developing a line balancing tool for reconfigurable manufacturing systems: A tool to support investment decisions2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This thesis aims to developing a decision-making tool which fits in a reconfigurable manufacturing system (RMS) milieu used to identify whether to introduce and produce a new product into an already existing assembly line or to invest in a new assembly line. To fulfil the purpose, four research questions were developed. 

    1. Which line balancing problem-solving techniques exist in the literature?
    2. Which investment costs can be considered vital for new assembly lines as a    consequence from new product introductions?
    3. Can a decision-making tool be designed to evaluate new product introductions which considers both line balancing KPIs and investment costs in an assembly line?
    4. To what extent can criteria in the RMS theory be linked with the attributes of the    designed decision-making tool to support its applicability?

    Method - Literature studies were performed in order to create a theoretical foundation for the thesis to stand upon, hence enabling the possibility to answer the research questions. The literature studies were structured to focus on selected topics, including reconfigurable manufacturing systems, line balancing, and assembly line investment costs. To answer the third research question, which involved creating a decision-making tool, a single-case study was carried out. The company chosen was within the automotive industry. Data was collected through interviews, document studies and a focus group.

    Findings & analysis - An investigation regarding which line balancing solving-techniques suit RMS and which assembly line investment costs are critical when  introducing new products has been made. The outputs from these  investigations set the foundation for developing a decision-making tool which enables fact-based decisions. To test the decision-making tool’s compatibility with reconfigurable manufacturing systems, an evaluation against established characteristics was performed. The evaluation identified two reconfigurable manufacturing system characteristic as having a direct correlation to the decision-making tool. These characteristics regarded scalability and convertibility.

    Conclusions - The industrial contribution of the thesis was a decision-making tool that enables fact-based decisions regarding whether to introduce a new product into an already existing assembly line or invest in a new assembly line. The academic contribution involved that the procedure for evaluating the tool was recognized as also being suitable for testing the reconfigurable correlation with other production development tools. Another contribution regards bridging the knowledge gaps of the classifications in line balancing-solving techniques and assembly line investment costs.

    Delimitations - One of the delimitations in the thesis involved solely focusing on developing and analysing a decision-making tool from an RMS perspective. Hence, other production systems were not in focus. Also, the thesis only covered the development of a decision-making tool for straight assembly lines, not U-shaped lines.

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    Abdelmageed & Skärin (2021)
  • 2.
    Alcayaga, Christian Junior
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Hoffsten, Jakob
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    A framework for enabling operators to use simulation for continuous improvement2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a time where digitalization is becoming more and more necessary to work with, tools such as simulation is becoming more of a standard to be able to make decisions made on facts. Within previous research there is a gap in the research, as the factors enabling operators to use simulation is an unexplored topic. Therefore, to fill this gap and provide the industry with help, this study fulfills the purpose: 

    Create a framework for enabling operators to use simulation for continuous improvements. 

    By looking at the different areas in the production and identifying challenges within the production, information handling between the departments and the structure of the company, the purpose of this study is fulfilled. The purpose was achieved through the usage of two research questions. 

    What are the challenges in practice for enabling operators to use simulation for continuous improvements? 

    How can these challenges be overcome, to enable operators to use simulation for continuous improvements? 

    To answer the research questions, a case study was performed alongside a literature review. The case study consisted of interviews performed at a case company within the automotive industry. The gathered empirical and theoretical data was then analyzed trough a thematic analysis. 

    The conclusion of this study was that, for enabling operators to use simulation for continuous improvements, companies must first have the right organizational structure, were a foundation for continuous improvement is present. The reason for this being that if a company desires to work with simulation tools, they must first work in an environment where suggestions and improvements are supported. 

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  • 3.
    Alghalayini, Rami
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Improving an internal material handling system. A case study of a Swedish company in food industry2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, customers are exerting a lot of pressure on companies by demanding for best product quality, customized products, reduced product lead time and reliable product delivery. Therefore, for companies to be highly competitive, there is need to improve productivity and delivery performance by having an efficient material flow. Nevertheless, the task of making the material to flow efficiently throughout the manufacturing process up to when the customer receives the product is not easy. To solve this, companies are focusing on the material handling system as it has an impact on efficient material flow and productivity. Hence, the aim of this project was to explore how an internal material handling system can be improved to guarantee a better delivery performance.

    To fulfil the aim, a single case study was undertaken at a dairy food producing company in Jonkoping. The information on the subject area was obtained through interviews, observation at the company and an extensive literature review. The information that was obtained was assessed in accordance with the framework of the project that includes; principles and physical elements used for designing a material handling system, software and information, and human and management.

    Combined analysis of the findings from the empirical study and the extensive literature review helped to identify the problems faced in an internal material handling system of the company. This was followed by identifying ways of improving material handling system and thereafter, improvement suggestions were made targeting enhancement of the delivery performance of the system.

    In conclusion, the findings indicate that improvement of an internal material handling system does not only depend on improving the physical attributes of the system, far from it, it is more dependent on having an efficient and effective information system. Another factors that came out is that there should be a proper integration of the material handling system and the workers operating the system. From a systems perspective this research has added information sharing and human and management to the one dimensional physical elements improvement of a material handling system.

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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Amaresh, Amaresh
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Oooramvely, Kuriachen
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Standardization in a High Mix Low Volume Company: A Case Study2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The market has been evolving from mass production towards mass customization, which has increased the complexity level for the companies. Unlike in mass production companies where the tasks are routine and standardized, the mass customization types of companies have a varied work demand which makes the work environment complex. These types of mass customization companies are known as High Mix Low Volume type of companies basically because of their characteristics of having a high mix in products and comparatively low volume production. 

    This thesis research was done with DEWTON INDUSTRIES, Kochi in India. Although product variety and complexity has been answered using technology development and modularization in the previous studies, there has been less focus given to reducing the complexity from the production process point of view. It is also evident that there is limited literature and research done regarding the standardization in High Mix Low Volume type companies both in the academia and in the industry. Hence, understanding the problems regarding standardization in a High Mix Low Volume company and how to handle them has been of a major importance at this point of time.

    The purpose of the research is to see how standardization can be increased in HMLV companies. The research approach used here was the case study to collect the necessary data to achieve the results. The data collection techniques used were interviews, observations and literature review, which gave the guidelines and suggested solutions to the identified problems related to standardization in High Mix Low Volume company in the production department. 

    The findings from the research suggest that standardization in HMLV production is very important for the companies in their current market demands. This is because standardization has a major effect on the quality of end products, production lead time, working standards of employees in the production department and design department. Various problems can occur, and only standardized procedures can solve these problems. It has been well exemplified in this thesis work, how these standardized procedures can increase the quality of the products, increase production speed, and also profit for the company.

    This research paper can be used as a guideline by other HMLV companies, while they plan to implement standardization in the production department. To the best of our knowledge this research was one of a kind in this particular field of study and also provides a base for in-depth research on each identified problem.

     

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    fulltext
  • 5.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Department of Materials and Production, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Department of Intelligent Production Systems, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Continuing Engineering Education in Changeable and Reconfigurable Manufacturing: Implications of Problem-Based Learning in Industrial Practice*2023In: International Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0949-149X, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 1118-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly volatile and complex manufacturing environments make the continuous development of engineering professionals’ knowledge and competences in changeable and reconfigurable manufacturing a major source of competitiveness in manufacturing companies. Enablers of this include modular and platform-based product and manufacturing system design, as well as industry 4.0 related technologies and digitalisation. Therefore, this paper focuses on Continuing Engineering Education (CEE) in changeable and reconfigurable manufacturing and investigates the implications of applying a university-industry collaborative approach to Problem-based Learning (PBL) for CEE in company-settings. The paper builds on a four-year CEE initiative from Swedish manufacturing industry and includes insights from implementing a CEE course in changeable manufacturing, which was designed based on PBL principles and run as an industry-university cooperation for four consecutive years. Implications addressed in the paper relates to (1) PBL as a suitable approach for CEE, (2) Research transfer to industry through PBL-based CEE, and (3) industry-university collaboration for CEE, which provides valuable insights on how to conduct successful CEE in knowledge fields that are fast evolving in order to enable fast industry transitions. 

  • 6.
    Andersson, Felicia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Stjernberg, Agnes
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Managing Successful Change Initiatives: An Investigation of Critical Success Factors for Six Sigma Introduction in Large Manufacturing Enterprises in Sweden2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Six Sigma is one of the most successful improvement strategies of the last 5 decades and has been implemented worldwide by organizations in different sectors and sizes. Despite the popularity, 60% of all Six Sigma initiatives are abandoned or end in failure. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to investigate what factors large manufacturing enterprises in Sweden need to prioritize to introduce Six Sigma successfully. The research was conducted as a holistic multiple-case study where qualitative data was collected through semi-structured interviews with three companies. A thematic analysis was made to identify patterns between the companies about critical success factors associated with Six Sigma, Change Management, and Organizational culture. It was shown that Company 1 has introduced Six Sigma but has no defined plan on how to move forward with the initiative. Company 2 has fully introduced the method and is actively working with it, while Company 3 has failed with the introduction of Six Sigma. All identified factors were rated as either a success or a failure factor for each case company. The success factors differentiating Company 2 from the other case companies have been evaluated to be the most critical success factors. Top management commitment, Organizational support, Organizational culture, Communication, and Strategic plan have been identified as the most critical success factors that must be prioritized to introduce Six Sigma successfully. Furthermore, cultural factors such as communication between departments, supportive managers, and committed top management have been identified as important to introduce Six Sigma successfully. The results of this study can be applied to successfully introduce change initiatives in large manufacturing enterprises in Sweden. 

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  • 7.
    Anderzon, Samuel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Davidsson, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Agile Practices in Production Development: Investigation of how agile practices may be applied in a production development context and what the expected effects are.2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization has continuously brought an increased competition among companies, which entails a need for faster and more frequent deliveries of new products. Traditional project management methods, such as stage-gate and waterfall, are commonly used in production development projects and builds on a sequential approach. These methods have proven to have some disadvantages in flexibility, long lead times and it often creates communication barriers between the actors at each stage. The software industry has already encountered these obstacles and responded by introducing agile project management. Which improves the adaptability and allow changes to be made, due to new requirements from stakeholders or customers, throughout the entire development process. However, it remains unknown how agile models can improve production development. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate how agile models can be applied to production development and what the effects are. 

    The authors have performed a case study at eight different companies within the automotive industry. The purpose of it has been to gain a deeper understanding about the case companies current production development processes and review how familiar the organizations are with the concept of agile project management. The extraction of the empirical data was conducted by questionnaires, interviews, and document reviews. An analyzation was done by comparing the empirical findings with the theoretical background out of eleven different categories that relates to project management (e.g., project goals, process, customer integration etc.). The analyzation concluded that the case company exclusively conducts their production development project by using a sequential approach. 

    The analyzation and the eleven categories where, together with the theoretical background about agile project management, later used to create the result by brainstorming different practices to become more agile. The results are presented out of three different scenarios, depending how agile the companies would like to be. For instance, are two process models suggested, one that is completely agile and one that is a hybrid of an agile and a stage-gate. Furthermore, are the implementation of self-organized teams, holistic approach towards internal and external partners, and reduced demand for documentation some of the practices that are suggested. Additionally, are three considerable aspects for the implementation presented. 

    The expected outcome and effects of applying these practices are discussed in the final chapter. Some of these outcomes are a company culture that will attract and retain talented personnel, where shared responsibilities and authorities triggers the employees to an increased commitment and sense of ownership towards their projects. Furthermore, are the companies expected to experience a more flexible and responsive approach towards conducting production development projects with a high focus on customer requirements and creating customer value. 

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    Agile practices in production development
  • 8.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    A method to capture and share production requirements supporting a collaborative production preparation process2023In: Proceedings of the Design Society: ICED23, Volume 3 - July 2023, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2023, Vol. 3, p. 273-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production preparation process (3P) enables collaboration between design and production engineers during product development but its efficiency is limited by the abundance of documentation of manufacturing constraints and capabilities. Empirical studies showed that use of production requirements can increase the efficiency of 3P, however, the support for production engineers to capture and share production requirements is scarce. A method to support production engineers in identifying, defining, structuring and sharing production requirements and collaborating with design engineers is presented. The method has three major parts - focus areas and requirement categories, a worksheet for production requirements capturing and prioritization, and a workflow for using the worksheet. The method was developed in collaboration with practitioners and contributes to the existing knowledge by providing production engineers with a structured way of working with production requirements. Evaluation of the method in the case company showed its usability when developing product variants and that additional work is needed to support the development of new product families and assembly lines.

  • 9.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Aligning Production Requirements with Product and Production Maturities: Enhancing Production Preparation during Product DevelopmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Design for Producibility: A Case Study on Theory, Practice and Gaps2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering: Proceedings of the 29th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2022) / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap & J. Stjepandić, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2022, p. 134-143Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changing customer requirements, regulations, technology and regulations, shift to automated assembly and product variety are common challenges faced by many manufacturing industries and alignment between product and production system is critical for business success. Design engineers should be aware of production constraints and capabilities to ensure efficient manufacture and assembly of products that are developed. This requires different and detailed support to guide the work, evaluate different design solutions, enable continuous and concurrent work with design for producibility and production preparation. A study was conducted in three companies to understand alignment and integration of product development and production preparation processes. Also, utilization of production requirements, design for manufacture and assembly (DFMA) and failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA) to support design for producibility (DFP) was studied. Currently, production preparation is done through discussions between design and production engineers. Production preparation and work with DFMA and FMEA is skill and experience dependent. Definition, structuring and sharing of production requirements on different system levels, from production and product perspectives are identified as critical to supporting design for producibility and production preparation. The work with FMEA and DFMA can be developed and improved with systematic and structured way of working with production requirements.

  • 11.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Product Platforms and Production: Current State and Future Research Directions Targeting Producibility and Production Preparation2021In: Transdisciplinary Engineering for Resilience: Responding to System Disruptions: Proceedings of the 28th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2021) / [ed] L. Newnes, S. Lattanzio, B. R. Moser, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2021, p. 332-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New business opportunities are created when the advantage of changeable manufacturing systems expand beyond increased freedom in production location to increased freedom in product design. However, there are new challenges to overcome, including improved ability to design and adapt products when requirements from stakeholders quickly change and/or new technology rapidly evolves. Simultaneously, the producibility of each design must be ensured while keeping the lead-time of the whole process to the minimum. Changeable product platforms (both flexible and adaptable platforms) are gaining attention in both research and industry. However, the level of alignment and integration of product development and production is critical for the efficiency of the product realization process. In this study, we map the state of practice in five companies with an initial literature review. The companies had no formal platform strategy and faced challenges with variant management and development time, had manual processes for production preparation and reuse of technical solutions and knowledge happened through components and documents. The production preparation and reuse were dependent on the engineer’s competence. Future work will concentrate on identifying how manufacturing inputs can be added as a design asset in a changeable product platform to enhance producibility and production preparation.

  • 12.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohamma
    et al.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Salomonsson, Kent
    School of Engineering Science, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Image regression-based digital qualification for simulation-driven design processes, case study on curtain airbag2023In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today digital qualification tools are part of many design processes that make them dependent on long and expensive simulations, leading to limited ability in exploring design alternatives. Conventional surrogate modelling techniques depend on the parametric models and come short in addressing radical design changes. Existing data-driven models lack the ability in dealing with the geometrical complexities. Thus, to address the resulting long development lead time problem in the product development processes and to enable parameter-independent surrogate modelling, this paper proposes a method to use images as input for design evaluation. Using a case study on the curtain airbag design process, a database consisting of 60,000 configurations has been created and labelled using a method based on dynamic relaxation instead of finite element methods. The database is made available online for research benchmark purposes. A convolutional neural network with multiple layers is employed to map the input images to the simulation output. It was concluded that the showcased data-driven method could reduce digital testing and qualification time significantly and contribute to real-time analysis in product development. Designers can utilise images of geometrical information to build real-time prediction models with acceptable accuracy in the early conceptual phases for design space exploration purposes.

  • 13.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Data-driven and real-time prediction models for iterative and simulation-driven design processes2022Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of more complex products has increased dependency on virtual/digital models and emphasized the role of simulations as a means of validation before production. This level of dependency on digital models and simulation togetherwith the customization level and continuous requirement change leads to a large number of iterations in each stage of the product development process. This research, studies such group of products that have multidisciplinary, highly iterative, and simulation-driven design processes. It is shown that these high-level technical products, which are commonly outsourced to suppliers, commonly suffer from a long development lead time. The literature points to several research tracks including design automation and data-driven design with possible support. After studying the advantages and disadvantages of each track, a data-driven approachis chosen and studied through two case studies leading to two supporting tools that are expected to improve the development lead time in associated design processes. Feature extraction in CAD as a way to facilitate metamodeling is proposed as the first solution. This support uses the concept of the medial axis to find highly correlated features that can be used in regression models. As for the second supporting tool, an automated CAD script is used to produce a library of images associated with design variants. Dynamic relaxation is used to label each variant with its finite element solution output. Finally, the library is used to train a convolutions neural network that maps screenshots of CAD as input to finite element field answers as output. Both supporting tools can be used to create real-time prediction models in the early conceptual phases of the product development process to explore design space faster and reduce lead time and cost.

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  • 14.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    A CAD-based image regression database enabling real-time prediction early in the design process, a case study on the airbag design processManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Data-driven and Real-time Prediction Models for Highly Iterative Product Development Processes2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap, J. Stjepandić, IOS Press, 2022, p. 463-472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some high-level technical products are associated with transdisciplinary simulation-driven design processes. Therefore, their design process involves many stakeholders and is prone to frequent changes, leading to a highly iterative process with a long lead time. Despite the decades of statistical approximations and metamodeling techniques on prediction models, companies are still striving toachieve fully automated real-time predictions in early design phases. The literature study shows a gap in existing methods such as not being fully real-time or suffering from high dimensionality. This paper presents a generic model for the development process of such described products and motivation for such modeling through a series of semi-structured interviews with an automotive sub-supplier company. The proposed process model points to the digital verification in every design loop as the bottleneck which is then confirmed by interviewees. As alternative solutions to overcome the problems, a method for data-driven and real-time prediction models is presented to enable the designer to foresee the consequence of their decision in the design phase. To evaluate the method, two examples of such real-time metamodeling techniques, developed in an ongoing research project are discussed. The proposed examples confirm that the framework can reduce lead time spent on digital verification and therefore accelerate the design process in such products.

  • 16.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Salomonsson, K.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering Science, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Balague, H.
    Autoliv AB, Vårgårda, Sweden.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Correlation-based feature extraction from computer-aided design, case study on curtain airbags design2022In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 138, article id 103634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many high-level technical products are associated with changing requirements, drastic design changes, lack of design information, and uncertainties in input variables which makes their design process iterative and simulation-driven. Regression models have been proven to be useful tools during design, altering the resource-intensive finite element simulation models. However, building regression models from computer-aided design (CAD) parameters is associated with challenges such as dealing with too many parameters and their low or coupled impact on studied outputs which ultimately requires a large training dataset. As a solution, extraction of hidden features from CAD is presented on the application of volume simulation of curtain airbags concerning geometric changes in design loops. After creating a prototype that covers all aspects of a real curtain airbag, its CAD parameters have been analyzed to find out the correlation between design parameters and volume as output. Next, using the design of the experiment latin hypercube sampling method, 100 design samples are generated and the corresponding volume for each design sample was assessed. It was shown that selected CAD parameters are not highly correlated with the volume which consequently lowers the accuracy of prediction models. Various geometric entities, such as the medial axis, are used to extract several hidden features (referred to as sleeping parameters). The correlation of the new features and their performance and precision through two regression analyses are studied. The result shows that choosing sleeping parameters as input reduces dimensionality and the need to use advanced regression algorithms, allowing designers to have more accurate predictions (in this case approximately 95%) with a reasonable number of samples. Furthermore, it was concluded that using sleeping parameters in regression-based tools creates real-time prediction ability in the early development stage of the design process which could contribute to lower development lead time by eliminating design iterations.

  • 17.
    Ashour Pour, Milad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Deployment of additive manufacturing and robotics for increasing flexibility in productions2022In: SPS2022: Proceedings of the 10th Swedish production symposium / [ed] A. H. C. Ng, A. Syberfelt, D. Högberg & M. Holm, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2022, p. 533-541Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As manufacturing industry seeks different strategies and technologies to respond to the ever-increasing demands in markets that prioritize versatility of products with low-volume productions, certain technologies and strategies gain more attraction and form higher acceptance levels among different sectors. Individual firms are driven by their market requirements. Various factors including product specification, assembly sequence, and manufacturing operations are central to the decisions that are made with respect to the type of technology to respond to market dynamics. Additive Manufacturing (AM) is one of the technology alternatives that has exhibited remarkable strengths in countering market disruptions. Although AM can be utilized along conventional technologies (i.e., subtracting and forming) in a hybrid context to combine advantages and offset weaknesses of each category, the arguments supporting its applications would need to be formulated rigorously to ensure investments are rightfully justified. Another alternative continuously investigated by companies is automation and more specifically, using robotics for various purposes e.g., operations like welding and painting, material handling, machine tending, etc. Both industrial robots and the applications that require a collaboration between humans and robots can be valid in this context. Considering advancements in AM and Automation and their potentials in increasing flexibility, expediting operations, and leveraging cost advantages, this paper explores how AM and automation in tandem could improve flexibility in productions. Results of this study can be used for proposing a conceptual model which will be further developed and then tested on industrial cases in future studies. While this study incorporates raw data about processing requirements in production that has been obtained via interviews with industrial companies, inputs about the technologies i.e., AM and robotics are derived from literature.

  • 18.
    Ashourpour, M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Azizpour, G.
    Husqvarna AB, Huskvarna, 56182, Sweden.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Real-Time Defect and Object Detection in Assembly Line: A Case for In-Line Quality Inspection2023In: Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Establishing Bridges for More Sustainable Manufacturing Systems / [ed] Silva, F., Pereira, A., Campilho, R., Springer, 2023, p. 99-106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of flawed assemblies and defective parts or products as early as possible is a daily struggle for manufacturing companies. With the ever-increasing complexity of assembly operations and manufacturing processes alongside the need for shorter cycle times and higher flexibility of productions, companies cannot afford to check for quality issues only at the end of the line. In-line quality inspection needs to be considered as a vital part of the process. This paper explores use of a real-time automated solution for detection of assembly defects through YOLOv8 (You Only Look Once) deep learning algorithm which is a class of convolutional neural networks (CNN). The use cases of the algorithm can be extended into detection of multiple objects within a single image to account for not only defects and missing parts in an assembly operation, but also quality assurance of the process both in manual and automatic cells. An analysis of YOLOv8 algorithm over an industrial case study for object detection shows the mean average precision (mAP) of the model on the test dataset and consequently its overall performance is extremely high. An implementation of this model would facilitate in-line quality inspection and streamline quality control tasks in complex assembly operations.

  • 19.
    Axelsson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Åslin, Rasmus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Real-Time Locating System (RTLS) Applicability for ERP Integration: Guidelines for Applicability and Barriers and Enablers for RTLS and ERP Integration2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Real-time Locating Systems (RTLS) are used to identify and locate physical assets in real-time. Essentially, the aim of RTLS is to increase process visibility and thus provide accurate process data concerning for example, lead times, cycle times and inventory control. Today, process visibility is one of the most critical aspects for manufacturing companies in their quest for higher quality and shorter lead times. Since the introduction of Industry 4.0, RTLS has received an upswing in attention in the literature. However, despite the technical advances, enterprises are struggling to fully comprehend the entire impact of RTLS. Further, when integrating RTLS and other IT systems, such as the ERP, business operations can be carried out based on real-time information, providing more value than a standalone RTLS. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system is the core IT system for enterprises. The ERP is in turn divided into several modules: Manufacturing, Warehouse, Human resources, Sales & Distribution, and Finance & Accounting. Evaluating the applicability for each module will provide a holistic view on RTLS and ERP integration that has a wider perspective than previous studies on the topic. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to examine and evaluate the applicability of integrating RTLS with the various ERP modules and present a set of guidelines for RTLS and ERP integration. The guidelines will be created based on the following research questions. RQ1: How can the various ERP modules utilize RTLS data? RQ2: What barriers and enablers are there when integrating RTLS and ERP?

    Research method. An extensive literature review and interviews with industry experts were conducted. Thematic analysis and thematic narrative analysis were applied to extract relevant information form the literature review and industry expert interviews. Thematic synthesis was applied to synthesize the information received from the result of the thematic analysis and thematic narrative analysis, thence answer the research questions, and create the guidelines.

    Findings. Applicability was found for all ERP modules and the main barriers identified was lack of mature processes, knowledge, and cost. The guidelines created in the study included five main steps. 1) organizational enablers, 2) IT structure enablers, 3) ERP module applicability, 4) knowledge and understanding, and 5) business case generation. The guidelines were presented in text and as a picture.

    Contributions. This study has contributed to research by expanding the perspective on RTLS and ERP integration further than previous studies on the topic. The study showed that all ERP modules can utilize the RTLS data to provide value for that particular module. This study contributes to industry by providing guidelines that can be utilized by managers and decision makers in their process of evaluating RTLS implementation Managers and decision makers can use these guidelines to create a fundamental understanding of how RTLS can create value for all ERP modules. This knowledge is a key to create profitable business cases. The guidelines will therefore facilitate enterprises to overcome the initial knowledge barriers and thus, contribute to the acceleration of the RTLS expansion within the industry.

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  • 20.
    Balasubramaniam, Arjun
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Navuluri, Naga Lakshmana Naidu
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Analysis and improvement of material handling in a highly customized multi-variant product-based production system2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty first century manufacturing is characterized by customer specific products. Customers expect greater differentiation in the products that companies offer to them, thus changing the whole landscape of production. Greater the variety of products being offered to customers, greater is the complexity of shop floor operations. This complexity is translated to all the operations in the shop floor including material handling and inventory control. To overcome this situation, many manufacturers have turned to “Lean Manufacturing” to gain a competitive edge in the market by reducing costs and improving productivity in all operations throughout the shop floor.

    Therefore, this purpose of this thesis is to analyze the material handling of a highly customized multi-variant product-based production system. The thesis represents a case study that was done at a caravan manufacturing company in Tenhult, Sweden. During the study, data was gathered from field notes, observations and multiple semi-structured interviews. The findings were analyzed with respect to a theoretical background which was generated through an extensive literature review that was carried out throughout the research.

    Our analysis was based on a systems approach where the findings were categorized into three dimensions that affect material handling and inventory control. These dimensions are warehouse management systems, culture, and production management, which contribute to successful implementation of lean into the material handling operations and inventory control.

    In conclusion, the results show that efficient material handling and inventory control can only be achieved by finding a synergy between technology, people and organization. Our results also show that soft issues like organizational culture and employee culture need to be addressed along with technological issues because only when an alignment between people, technology and business objectives and values is achieved, lean implementation can be successful. Our results also show the need for better supplier customer collaboration to reduce inventory levels and material handling operation.

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  • 21.
    Bangalore Rajanna, Raghunandan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Prasad Nallaye karthikeyan, Harvind
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Value Stream Analysis of Online Deliveries at Ecommerce Department in a Logistic Company2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Lean production is one of the proven approaches for identifying and eliminating the activities that do not add value to the customers and delivering and provide the best possible quality service to customers. Implementation of lean is deemed to be feasible in any organization regardless of its size or industry background. For initiating lean in an organization there are many tools, techniques and approaches that are available. Value Stream Mapping (VSM) is one such tool that is touted as cost-effective and easy to be implemented. This thesis proposes to conduct Value Stream Analysis (VSA) at at e-commerce (online) department at the case company to understand their material and information flows by analyzing the current state and develop implementable solutions to improve the overall productivity of the online deliveries. The tasks to perform are:

    · To map the current state value stream.

    · To identify wastages and propose solutions to eliminate them.

    · To provide productivity improvement proposals.

    A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods were used in this study for data collection and data analysis. This project, which is designed as a longitudinal case study that pri-marily focuses on gathering accurate, real-time data related to the product family, and on drawing a visual representation of the current materials and information flow. VSM has been implemented and the data were analysed. The results obtained from this study concludes that, VSM is an appropriate technique to initiate lean ways of work in larger firms that lacks sufficient knowledge and experience on lean. In addition to it, produc-tivity improvement proposals provided in this study are considered to be key factors in initiating lean transformation in an organization from a technical point of view while, management support and acceptance of change is necessary from an organizational point of view. This thesis will be useful to researchers, professionals and others con-cerned subject to understand the significance of value stream mapping in larger e-com-merce logistic firms.

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  • 22.
    Bergström, Adam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Jödicke, Luisa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Reconfigurability Assessment Model: Assessment of a Manufacturing System's Current State2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s global market and growing competition set an increasing strain to manufacturing companies. Shorter product lifecycles automatically lead to shorter production ramp up periods and, therefore, set a higher strain on the manufacturing systems. The concept of reconfigurable manufacturing systems (RMS) was developed in the early 1990s and has now gained more interest than ever. An RMS is designed to quickly respond to changes in market demand, by adapting its functionality as well as its capacity to the current market requirements. In order to achieve this, an RMS is characterised by six core characteristics: modularity, integrability, diagnosability, convertibility, scalability and customisation. By complying with these characteristics, the manufacturing system can meet the required responsiveness to functionality and capacity changes. Academia has been focusing on the development and design of new RMSs, however, there is a lack in research on converting existing manufacturing systems towards reconfigurability. Additionally, few models assessing a manufacturing system’s current state in terms of reconfigurability are available in literature. The existing reconfigurability assessment models were proven to be rather theoretical and difficult to use by practitioners in industry. Therefore, the need for a reconfigurability assessment model applicable in industry arose. This study focuses on the analysis of enablers of a reconfigurability manufacturing systems as well as on assessing the reconfigurability of an existing manufacturing system in an industrial setting. For this purpose, a detailed reconfigurability assessment model has been developed, based on literature studies and a case study at a case company. A focus of the development of the model has been set on usability in industry. The outcome was an assessment model developed in Microsoft Excel that gives an overview on the reconfigurability of each characteristic as well as the manufacturing system’s overall reconfigurability. The model was subsequently tested and verified at the case company. The final reconfigurability assessment model is presented and explained at the end of this study. This study shows, that through the use of theory about RMS and input from industry it was possible to develop a current state assessment model regarding reconfigurability. To make the model generalisable and adaptable to different industrial settings, further testing in different manufacturing fields and research within RMS is required.

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  • 23.
    BHAT, MANOJ MANJUNATH
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    BHANDARKAR, VIGNESH
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Investigating the impact of lean philosophy for identification and reduction of delays associated with performance of production line2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the present world scenario, the rapid industrialization and growth of manufacturing sector has led to the rise of large number of companies focusing on increase in profitability for sustaining the company’s profit margin at a higher level. While most of the companies fail to differentiate between productivity, profitability and performance as all the three growth indicators have different factors affecting them. The productivity of a system is evaluated through the ratio of output and input whereas the profitability is evaluated by measuring the capital flow. But the performance of any system is measured by the speed, quality and time consumed for delivery of a product. Thus, the preliminary growth indicator to be focused by any company must be productivity as it defines the effective input and efficient output of a system or production line and further provide attention for performance. Any productive system to function smoothly must include less amount of wastes, these wastes need not be a particular form. According to lean philosophy there are basically eight wastes arising in a system which has to be considered for elimination or reduction preferably. These wastes not only affect a particular process, while causes negative effects on the performance of entire system by causing delays in the process which increases nonvalue added time and reduces the actual operating time of a process. The present study focuses on exploring lean philosophy for identifying the existing delays of a production system and to further investigate the root causes influencing these delays which effect delivery of product. This study involves a deductive approach of qualitative type of research and the methods used for data collection includes a single case study with systematic literature review of data on which analysis is carried out and derived results are concluded in the final chapter of this research. The conclusion will be based on the results obtained from analysis of data carried out with the aid of tools existing under lean philosophy. The research is concluded by suggesting the solution for reducing delays utilizing simple tools of lean philosophy which can be utilized by manufacturing firms with effective utilization of existing machinery, men and methods and low investment of capital.

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  • 24.
    Boldt, Simon
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Supporting long-term production development: Towards production platforms2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With shrinking product life cycles and increasing competitive pressure, the traditional way of developing production systems is becoming obsolete. A longer-term perspective that considers the stream of product realisation projects to be implemented in the production system over its lifetime is required. Because of the success of different platform strategies in the product domain, platforms in the production domain are deemed a viable avenue for exploration to reach longevity in production capabilities. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to support a long-term view of production development through production platforms. This aim is addressed through two research questions (RQs). RQ1 is ‘What challenges and enablers exist for long-term production development?’ and should identify hindrances and good practices towards reaching long-term production development. RQ2 is ‘How can a platform approach support long-term production development?’ and describes how a platform approach for long-term production development could be. Four studies were conducted and reported in the four appended papers. The research is based on an interactive research approach with three empirically-based studies and one systematic literature review. The findings indicate that production development is conducted from a short-term perspective. Several challenges were identified regarding long-term production development, as well as the fact that the use of production platforms is not applied in industry. Further, the production platform literature is found to be still rather limited but it has been concluded that production platforms are an approach to describe the production system and its assets to facilitate reuse. Support for achieving long-term production development is presented, including production capability mapping (PCM) support. PCM support enables platform descriptions to be generated and used as a foundation in long-term production development to create a production system that possesses a higher ability to absorb changes. 

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  • 25.
    Boldt, Simon
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Utmaningar och möjligheter för långsiktig produktionsutveckling [bloggpost]2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ingress: I dagens konkurrensutsatta marknad behöver företag anpassa sin produktionsutveckling för att uppnå långsiktig hållbarhet och konkurrenskraft. Detta innebär att vi måste ta steg bort från att bara optimera för dagens krav och istället inkludera osäkerheten i framtiden i våra beslut. Detta angreppssätt är en av de viktigaste utmaningarna vi står inför idag.

  • 26.
    Boldt, Simon
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Linnéusson, Gary
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Exploring the Concept of Production Platforms - A literature review2021In: Procedia CIRP: Towards Digitalized Manufacturing 4.0 / [ed] D. Mourtzis, Elsevier, 2021, Vol. 104, p. 158-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production platforms can be considered as the foundation for the design, development, and reconfiguration of a production system. Even though, the product platform domain has been extensively researched and applied widely in practice, this is not the case in the production domain regarding production platforms and reconfigurable production systems. Therefore, this paper reviews the current product and production platform literature to distinguish the production platform co-development research. A systematic literature review has been carried out to explore the concept of production platforms and pinpoint what research gaps that needs to be bridged.

  • 27.
    Boldt, Simon
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Evaluation of Reconfigurability in Brownfield Manufacturing Development2020In: SPS2020: Proceedings of the Swedish Production Symposium, October 7–8, 2020 / [ed] K. Säfsten & F. Elgh, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2020, Vol. 13, p. 513-524Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable manufacturing firms adapting their manufacturing capabilities to meet the market demands in a cost-efficient way the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing was initiated. A majority of the research within this field targeting production development has been focused on greenfield development methods, enabling the developers to ignore context and constraints that brownfield development methods cannot. The greenfield focus in reconfigurability research has resulted in how to find optimal solutions to reconfiguration problems. Taking a brownfield focus on reconfigurable manufacturing development would enable to move step-by-step towards a reconfigurable manufacturing strategy instead of the all-or-nothing approach of greenfield development methods. This study investigates through a literature review what assessment tools and methods that exists in literature, and classifies them into four categories, i.e. Configuration evaluation, Element of evaluation, Pre-design evaluation, and Potential evaluation. It is found that there only exist two assessment tools for potential evaluation. Through a multiple case study, the potential evaluation process is evaluated, and three gaps is identified, i.e. lack of connection to strategy, lack of predefined goals for reconfigurability, and the difficulty in interpreting the result of the analysis. These gaps are then address in a new conceptual assessment process for assessing the potential of reconfigurability. The conceptual assessment process links the six reconfigurability characteristics throughout the whole assessment process to link manufacturing strategy to the improvement suggestions.

  • 28.
    Boldt, Simon
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Bergström, A.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Jödicke, L.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Assessment of Reconfigurability Level within Existing Manufacturing Systems2021In: Procedia CIRP: Towards Digitalized Manufacturing 4.0 / [ed] D. Mourtzis, Elsevier, 2021, Vol. 104, p. 1458-1463Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable firms adapting their manufacturing capabilities to meet the market demands in a cost-efficient way the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing was established. A starting point towards implementing reconfigurable manufacturing in a brownfield setting is to identify the current level of reconfigurability. In this paper a model to assess the level of reconfigurability is proposed. The assessment model has been developed through a multiple case study in collaboration with industry. The model is founded on the characteristics of reconfigurability and provides indication of the reconfigurability level.

  • 29.
    Boldt, Simon
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Linnéusson, Gary
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Challenges Towards Long-Term Production Development: An Industry Perspective2022In: Towards Sustainable Customization: Bridging Smart Products and Manufacturing Systems: Proceedings of the Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production Conference and the World Mass Customization & Personalization Conference / [ed] A.-L. Andersen, R. Andersen, T. D. Brunoe, M. S. S. Larsen, K. Nielsen, A. Napoleone & S. Kjeldgaard, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 113-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-performing product realisation process in order to introduce new products with high frequency to a low cost, is becoming more of a pre-requisite for manufacturing companies. In a multiple case study, this paper investigates applied industrial practices in production development to support the production realisation process and reports on the current ways of working and challenges therein. The areas of current production development practices, production platforms, standardised work, and knowledge development are explored. Identified challenges towards long-term production development based on the explored areas are presented. The inclusion of future need of production system adaptions from future products is argued for to increase its efficiency. Through including future need of the production system, the notion of considering one product at the time during industrialisation is challenged and a more proactive perspective can be taken. The production platform approach is considered as one enabler for such an improved production development.

  • 30.
    Boldt, Simon
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Linnéusson, Gary
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design.
    Mapping production capabilities: Proposing support towards changeable production2023In: Production Processes and Product Evolution in the Age of Disruption: Proceedings of the 9th Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production Conference (CARV2023) and the 11th World Mass Customization & Personalization Conference (MCPC2023), Bologna, Italy, June 2023 / [ed] F. G. Galizia, M. Bortolini, Springer, 2023, p. 330-337Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional way of developing production systems is often limited by merely considering an imminent new product. The longevity of a production system’s lifecycle is at risk following this approach and may create a focus on the current functionality and capacity rather than on fulfilling future product requirements. Changeable production address this challenge, however, support for production engineers to consider more changeable solutions is lacking. Thus, this paper proposes support for evaluating production capabilities and mapping how new products may impact the production system. The support is developed in two industrial cases which studied current production capabilities and future requirements put on two automatic assembly lines. The support allows for estimates of the cost of repurposing the assembly lines to accommodate the new products and paves the way for seeing beyond the dedicated manufacturing paradigm towards increased levels of changeable production.

  • 31.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Non-virgin textile materials challenging the purchasing role in a circular industry2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the era of moving towards a Circular Economy (CE), companies are facing challenges in redesigning their supply chains, towards managing i.e., recycled material and new requirements. Today, the textile industry is one of the segments that affects environmental sustainability most. Therefore, this paper’s purpose is to explore how non-virgin textile materials challenging the purchasing role in a circular industry, especially related to the perspective from Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs). And the resulting research question is, therefore, what different challenges must a purchasing organization manage related to textile products in a circular industry.

  • 32.
    Carlson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Diener, Derek
    RISE.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Kurilova-Palisaitiene, Jelena
    Linköping University.
    Nilsson-Lindén, Hanna
    RISE.
    Vogt Duberg, Johan
    Linköping University.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University.
    REMAnufactuRing – Key enABLEr to future business (REMARKABLE)2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circularity through remanufacturing

    Remanufacturing can be described as a process of bringing used products to “like-new” functional state. It is an industrial process whereby products referred as cores are restored to useful life. During this process the core pass through a number of remanufacturing steps, e.g., inspection, disassembly, part replacement/refurbishment, cleaning, reassembly, and testing to ensure it meets the desired product standards’.

    Remanufacturing involves not only new processes but also necessitates changes in product design, the adoption of new business models, advancements in information management, and the inclusion of sustainability assessments. These assessments ensure that the new designs and circular business models implemented are not only circular but also sustainable. All these aspects form a crucial part of the REMARKABLE project, contributing to the development of a comprehensive remanufacturing ecosystem.

    The purpose of the REMARKABLE project is to support manufacturers to become more resilient, circular, and sustainable through remanufacturing and contribute to a more efficient use ofresources.

    Project activities and initial results

    The REMARKABLE project involves six highly engaged manufacturing companies from a variety of sectors that will collaborate during 2022-2025. At first, workshops have taken place with each company to identify needs, challenges and ambitions. In addition, five student projects have been conducted during spring 2022 along with two study visits at participating companies.

    Initial company discussions shows that remanufacturing tends to question current business models and generate grounds for circular business models development (e.g. leasing, rental, deposit system). Remanufacturing often also questions the current value network and the actors in it, as remanufacturing flows can generate need of new business relationships whilst maintaining current business models.

    Remanufacturing poses challenges due to small batch sizes, low automation, and reliance on manual labor. Flexibility and specific capabilities are needed to handle uncertainties, complexity in planning, and ensure efficiency. Tools, methods, and frameworks are necessary to effectively balance all three pillars of sustainability. The development process of remanufacturing systems plays a critical role in achieving sustainability performance which also requires effective information management.

    Commonly, the products are not adapted for remanufacturing. Within the REMARKABLE project we are investigating how to make the products easier to remanufacture by design. This includes for example aspects of making the product easier to clean and disassemble.

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    Poster
  • 33.
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Hansbo, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Larson, M. G.
    Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics, Umeå University.
    Finite element procedures for computing normals and mean curvature on triangulated surfaces and their use for mesh refinement2020In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, ISSN 0045-7825, E-ISSN 1879-2138, Vol. 372, article id 113445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we consider finite element approaches to computing the mean curvature vector and normal at the vertices of piecewise linear triangulated surfaces. In particular, we adopt a stabilization technique which allows for first order L2-convergence of the mean curvature vector and apply this stabilization technique also to the computation of continuous, recovered, normals using L2-projections of the piecewise constant face normals. Finally, we use our projected normals to define an adaptive mesh refinement approach to geometry resolution where we also employ spline techniques to reconstruct the surface before refinement. We compare our results to previously proposed approaches.

  • 34.
    Chandrashekar, Sharath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Sawalekar, Vishal
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Forecast and Context Driven Sales & Operations Planning2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 35.
    Das, Sudip Kumar
    et al.
    Bharti School of Engineering, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Zhang, Junfeng
    Bharti School of Engineering, Laurentian University.
    A physics-based estimation of mean curvature normal vector for triangulated surfaces2019In: Proceedings of the International Geometry Center, ISSN 2072-9812, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 70-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this note, we derive an approximation for the mean curvature normal vector on vertices of triangulated surface meshes from the Young-Laplace equation and the force balance principle. We then demonstrate that the approximation expression from our physics-based derivation is equivalent to the discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator approach in the literature. This work, in addition to providing an alternative expression to calculate the mean curvature normal vector, can be further extended to other mesh structures, including non-triangular and heterogeneous meshes. 

  • 36.
    Devarakonda, Rakesh Raghavendra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Ramachandrareddy, Sumanth
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Production System waste reduction using Value stream mapping: An Industrial case study2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid rise in global population and market demands have mandated industries to introduce better and quality products to meet up their rushing needs. However, achiev-ing such goals need optimal production system and robust strategies. Exploring in depth it can be visualized that most of the manufacturing set ups suffers losses or relatively lower benefits due to improper and high wastages. Hence it is very important for man-ufacturing industries to explore the techniques which help them to improve their pro-duction system. The key techniques from Lean Manufacturing (LM) such as Value Stream Mapping (VSM) and Ishikawa diagram were explored in this work for enhanc-ing production capacity, reducing rework, reducing wastages and arriving to a well-defined optimal process flow which in turn help in achieving higher productivity. How-ever, the implementation of Lean and Value stream mapping depends on the production scale and has its own significance to different manufacturing setup. With that motive, in this thesis work the emphasis was made on exploring VSM technique for better pro-duction optimization in manufacturing sector.

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    final report_T10_Rakesh_Sumanth
  • 37.
    Dhayanithi, Amarnath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Sureshkumar, Deepak
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    COST OPTIMIZATION IN PRODUCTION SYSTEMS: USING LEAN MANUFACTURING2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the era of globalization, every company is trying its best to sustain its company’s name and their product in its respective market.

    The overreach goal of the thesis to optimize the cost in the production system using lean manufacturing. To attain the primary goal of the thesis, three layered approach has been carried out.

    Firstly, the non-value-added activities in the shop floor has been identified. The tools like VSM and spaghetti diagram is used to identify the non-value-added activities

    Secondly, the lead time of a particular product has been calculated for a particular product. The lean tools like JIT,5s, TQM, TPM has been used to reduce the lead time. TQM is used to identify the quality issues, TPM is used to identify the maintenance problems and JIT &5s is used to identify the problems in tool arrangement and delivery of the raw materials.

    The last part of the thesis is to measure the cost-effectiveness by implementing lean manufacturing to produce a particular product family. Tools like Activity based costing is used to allocate the cost involved in the various activities that can be measured by the cost drivers and cost pool. To measure the performance of the production system OEE is used in this thesis

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  • 38.
    Enell, Emil
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    The future of riding lawnmowing2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Riding lawnmowers is a tool that has the same main function as all other mowers, to cut the grass. Since the first lawn care product were introduces new functions has not been developed. Togheter with SIGMA in Jönköping a new design concept is developed to find new ways to interact with the product but at the same time communicate clearly that the product is developed towards the company Husqvarna.

  • 39.
    Eriksson, Gustav
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Isendahl, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Conceptual decision support tool for RMS-investments: A three-pronged approach to investments with focus on performance metrics for reconfigurability2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today's society is characterized by a high degree of change where the manufacturing systems are affected by both internal and external factors. To adapt to current manufacturing requirements in the form of short lead-time, more variants, low and fluctuating volumes, in a cost-efficient manner, new approaches are needed. As the global market and its uncertainties for products and its lifecycles change, a concept called 'reconfigurable manufacturing system' has been developed. The idea is to design a manufacturing system for rapid structural change in both hardware and software to be responsive to capacity and functionality. A company's development towards the concept is often based on a strategy of incremental investments. In this situation, the challenges are to prioritize the right project and maximize the performance as well as the financial efficiency of a multi-approach problem. The report is based on three different issues. Partly how to standardize relevant performance-based metrics to measure current conditions, how new performance-based metrics can be developed in collaboration with reconfigurability characteristics, and set a direction for how decision models can be used to optimize step-based investments. The study is structured as an explorative study with qualitative methods such as semi-structured interviews and document study to get in-depth knowledge. Related literature addresses concepts in search areas such as reconfigurable manufacturing system, key performance indicators, investment decisions, and manufacturing readiness levels.

    The findings are extracted from interviews and document studies that generate a focal company setting within the automotive industry, which acts as the foundation for further analysis and decisions throughout the thesis. The analysis results in sixteen performance measurements where new measures been created for product flexibility, productionvolume flexibility, material handling flexibility, reconfiguration quality and diagnosability using reconfigurability characteristics. A conceptual decision support model is introduced with an underlying seven-step investment process, analyzing lifecycle cost, risk triggered events in relation to cost, and performance measurements. The discussion chapter describes how different approaches are used during the project that has been revised by internal and external factors. Improvement possibilities regarding method choice and the aspects of credibility, transferability, dependability, and conformability are discussed.

    Furthermore, the authors argue about the analysis process and how the result has been affected by circumstances and choices. The study concludes that a three-pronged approach is needed to validate the investment decision in terms of system performance changes, cost, and uncertainty. The report also helps to understand which performance-based metrics are relevant for evaluating manufacturing systems based on operational goals and manufacturing requirements.

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  • 40.
    Eriksson, Gusten
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Persson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Organisational ambidexterity in manufacturing SMEs: An empirical study of managers’ and workers’ perceptions of ambidextrous elements2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational ambidexterity is considered a key to company survival and performance. Despite this, organisational ambidexterity is still a poorly understood phenomenon, especially in an SME context. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate how the compliance with ambidextrous elements is perceived at different levels in manufacturing SMEs, to increase the understanding of organisational ambidexterity in this context. The empirical data was collected through a combination of questionnaire and interview. The case companies in this report perceive that they comply stronger with contextual elements than with structural elements. The strong compliance with contextual elements is motivated by the lack of hierarchies, flexibility in the company, different management structure and low number of employees. This allows employees to perform the contextual elements such as initiative-taking, cooperating, brokering and multitasking. The structural elements including e.g. vision, values, strategies, senior team responsibility and alignment are perceived differently at different  hierarchal levels, indicating that there are subcultures within the hierarchal levels within a company. The biggest difference can be found between the middle managers and the top managers,. Workers perceive that they are not included in explorationb within the company, and that the exploration occur more sporadically than those for exploitation. The definitions of exploration and exploitation vary between the companies which results in a lack of consensus. This makes it difficult for the companies to perform the changes necessary in order to develop and achieve long-term sustainable growth i.e. economical sustainability. The managerial implication of this report concerns four actions: (1) create a common definition for exploration, (2) develop goals for exploration, (3) communicate for buy-in and (4) involve all employees.

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  • 41.
    Ettehad, Melina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Challenges for Textile SMEs to Reach Sustainability2023In: Production Processes and Product Evolution in the Age of Disruption: Proceedings of the 9th Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production Conference (CARV2023) and the 11th World Mass Customization & Personalization Conference (MCPC2023), Bologna, Italy, June 2023 / [ed] F. G. Galizia, M. Bortolini, Springer, 2023, p. 393-403Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The textile industry has a significant environmental impact while at the same time playing an important role in society. There is a need to improve the textile industry's sustainability. Textile SMEs encounter numerous challenges to reach sustainability. This paper aims at recognizing the challenges by collecting, analyzing, and discussing some theoretical and empirical data. At the end of this paper, six main groups of challenges are presented: lack of stakeholder knowledge about sustainability, lack of resources, lack of communication, and effective legislation. Also, recognizing the relevant needs and finding some conceptual solutions for textile SMEs to overcome the challenges and reach more sustainability are considered as future work of this study.

  • 42.
    Gasslander, Lina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Holmberg, Gustav
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Integrating digital marketing strategies and efficiency when designing an assembly line with high product variations: A case study performed at Habo Plast AB2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The volatile nature of the current market situation forces companies to improve their competitiveness in different ways. An important but unexplored research area is the integration between production marketing and production efficiency. This research area is important as it can assist companies to improve their competitiveness. The integration between digital marketing and production was examined in this study, and to which extent this integration affects the ability to design an effective and flexible assembly line at a case company. An abductive research approach formed the methodology during this research project, which was a case study where literature review, interviews and observations was used to gather data. The deductive approach facilitated the ability to analyze existing theories and form guidelines to follow when designing an efficientand flexible assembly line. The abductive approach facilitated the integration of the digital marketing strategies with the design of an efficient and flexible assembly line. The analysis showed that the digital marketing attributes had both positive and negative impacts on the production efficiency. It was also stated that using the production as a marketing tool can in fact result in a positive outcome for both parts. Using the production as a part of the marketing strategy could encourage companies to keep the production space clean and structured, which in turn have a positive effect on the production efficiency. The study results also indicated that it is important to consider possible trade-offs that might occur when using the production as a marketing tool. In the case of Habo Plast, the main trade-offs that was found was that the shape of the assembly line is not aligned with both the efficiency and Habo Plast’s marketing purpose. The trade-offs for production marketing are, however, dependent on companies’ chosen marketing attributes and can therefore not be generalizable for all companies. As this subject is an unexplored research area, suggestions for further research are also included in this report. 

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  • 43.
    GONDI, REVANTH SAI
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    KURUGONDA, RINESH
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Developing a standardized framework for achieving efficient material flow by eliminating effects of non value added activities2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s competitive global market every companies strive to overcome challenges that occur during manufacturing in order to gain profits and stay in competition. Overcoming challenges include elimination or reduction of non-value adding activities that are happening in production. To eliminate non-value adding activities and achieve desired workflow it is important to follow set of successful strategies which suits production system. In this current research framework has been proposed which aids reduction of non-value adding activities and also plays an important role in achieving efficient material flow. Current research is carried out in a single case study at a Swedish manufacturing firm where identification of effects of existing non-value-added activities in major aspects of material flow was carried out. By analysing the findings from case company along with data from literature review effects of NVA on material flow were identified in production facility and solution has been recommended in the form of framework to overcome these problems. In the conclusion a set of strategies were developed into a framework by analysing the effects of existing NVA in production facility has been further recommended for implementation at case company to check for generalisability of developed framework. This framework aids in overcoming common problems associated with material flow along with eliminating effects of NVA activities and also helps improving productivity which enhances proper flow of materials into line.

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  • 44.
    Gowda Shivaprasad, Chethan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Paul, Joe
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    An efficient scheduling and planning system to increase productivity in Third Party logistics.: System to provide alternative planning and scheduling for unexpected situations.2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concentrates on implementing an efficient scheduling and planning system for a Third-Party Logistics Company as a 3PL has more restrictions and parameters on how their work gets carried out on daily basis. The problems associated with the case company is that the company has poor scheduling and planning system which is leading to decrease in productivity and increase in backlog of work. Due to lag in information flow between the stakeholders, planner is unable to predict the different situation. In this technological era, it is important to enhance planning and scheduling which directly reflects on productivity. On understanding the present problem based on interview with the traffic department, questionnaires to the shopfloor employees and observations made, authors selected particular framework by referring different journal articles which led to find the solution for the problem.

    This report gives the solution for enhanced scheduling system by integration of digitalization. Digitalization helps in reaching the updated information faster which is required for planning and scheduling process. An efficient scheduling and Planning system always help in a smooth functioning of any production facility. It keeps the work to be done on track and helps the employee in finishing the task for the day in the best possible way. This thesis is carried out and conclusion is achieved by solving the existing problem for the case company. This system may further enhance by incorporating RFID system which updates the information faster with more data required for planning and scheduling system.

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  • 45.
    Gustafsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Heed, Victor
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Rotorsaksanalys av lackskador2021Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Having a high quality of its production is important for all companies, the quality must be high both during and after the processing process. In order to maintain a high quality, companies should actively work to strengthen their quality. This thesis deals with the quality problem that paint damage entails for the company. A well-proven method in quality technology is to carry out a root cause analysis in the event of repeated quality deficiencies of a similar type.

    By building an understanding of production, a feasibility study was conducted on the current situation. The feasibility study provided a deeper understanding of the vital building blocks of production, but also much about theories about Lean production, which is a corporate strategy on which the company builds its production. The description of the current situation provided an understanding of how big the problem of paint damage was for the company. The description also showed that at present only five why is used, which is the method for finding root causes for quality deficiencies.

    Based on the company's pursuit of Lean production without losses, a root cause analysis was applied for the paint damage to the cab line to identify its actual cause of the damage. These reasons are further discussed and set against the proposed measures that were developed together with employees at the company. The proposed measures were then ranked from largest to smallest likely to be implemented in the future.

    Finally, the conclusions and recommendations on which the study was based are presented.

  • 46.
    Gwinner, Andreas
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Implementation framework to realize the Smart Factory: Development of a practical framework to leverage the organizational implementation of the Smart Factory2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Global megatrends and the resulting challenges for manufacturing companies, have brought up the concept of Industry 4.0 (I4.0) and its heart the Smart Factory (SF). Through I4.0 and the application of SF companies can increase their creation of value, however the degree of value depends on the way of implementation. Scholars and studies of successful SF implementation are still in an infant stage, and companies find little guidance in literature. Therefore, research question one targets on how to implement the SF and research question two on the investigation of success factors, challenges and outcomes of the successful SF implementation.

    The literature review included 216 scholars in the field of SF implementation. On this basis, a theoretical proposition was developed, to guide data collection and analysis. For development of the practical framework, multiple case studies have been chosen. Through an orientation study, seven cases in a multinational manufacturing company have been selected for the research. The developed framework has been validated again with the experts in the company.

    The developed implementation framework consists out of two parts. A strategic implementation process, including a SF maturity model to support the gradual advancement towards the SF and an operational implementation process for SF technologies, to advance to the higher maturity level. The framework represents a step-by-step approach including key activities, success factors and challenges of each phase. To justify an implementation, different outcomes have been clustered and organized to provide an overview.

    As this work is based on the current advancement of the research field, it first provides a condensed summary of SF implementation and second, through answering RQ1 and RQ2 closes research gaps. Hence, it contributes to the further advancement of the research field by providing a clear framework on the implementation approach and key factors, as well as a starting point for further research.

    With the SF implementation framework, this work provides the missing connection between a directed strategic approach and new technology implementation with a step-by-step guideline to facilitate the implementation of SF. The framework represents a guideline, to be used by managers, including the most important aspects to consider.

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    Implementation framework to realize the Smart Factory
  • 47.
    Göranson, Leo
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Abrahamsson, Oscar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Design study with Husqvarna Group: Designstudie för Husqvarna Group2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 48.
    Harisekar, Vigneshwar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Increasing sustainability performance in a SME: Focusing on lean and green2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The SMEs are considered as the backbone of the country, they are contributing the biggest part of the country’s GDP (Gross domestic product). The SMEs are showing rapid growth and facing tough competition to satisfy the customer needs. The purpose of the report is to identify the solution to increasing sustainability performance and having the focus on the pillars of sustainability social, economic, and environmental in an SME within the production systems. The research is focused on enriching the qualitative study, to have an in-depth understanding, and triangulation of method has been used. The findings collected from the case company about the production system and current sustainability performance are presented. Then, lean and green paradigms are presented along with the overlapping factors. Then the findings are analyzed which includes the cause-effect relationship for lean and green followed by a selection of lean and green tools such as 5S and VSM are analyzed. 

    The research provides a solution to regain its competitiveness for the SME in the current industrial development by incorporating lean and green principles into their production systems. The initial step for attaining it to kick start with 5S and, Value stream mapping. The conclusion of this research showing the sustainability performance improvement suggestions is presented using lean and green tools into the SME. This research will be much needed for the present scenario especially for the SMEs, as they are the backbone of the country’s economy. This serves as a motivation and moves their focus to attain sustainability to serve evergreen with their customers. Finally, the future work of this research work along with managerial suggestion is presented which ensures to minimize the CO2 with leaner and green tools.

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  • 49.
    Hedlund, Andreas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Blom, Daniel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Correlation-based analysis on thin walled tubes2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the transportation sector, crash structures are often used to protect their inhabitants inthe event of a collision. These crash structures frequently utilize thin-walled tubes as energyabsorbers. The process of developing thin-walled tubes is iterative based and requires mul-tiple simulations, making it resource intensive. This thesis researches how thin-walled tubesare developed today, what kind of challenges exist in the development process and whattools and methods are used to shorten the development lead times. Later a new methodfor assessing TWBs crashworthiness before a simulation is investigated. In this method43 cross-section geometries from thin-walled tubes used in automobiles are parameterized.These tubes are later subjected to a dynamic crash simulation along their longitudinal axis.Results from these simulations are correlated to their respective parameters in order to findmeaningful relation between the parameters and results. It was found that the circumferenceof a cross-section correlates with its crashworthiness. With this finding, the developmentlead times of thin-walled tubes could be shortened by reducing the amount of required FEMsimulations.

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  • 50.
    Hedlund, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Namroud, Larsina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    A framework for digitalized information management in food value chains: A study in the Swedish bread and bakery manufacturing industry2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Information management is crucial for a food manufacturing company as it increases productivity, lowers cost, and enables traceability as well as data-driven decision-making. A lack of information management leads to consequences such as lack of customer demand and requirements, which result in high inventory or stockout. The purpose of this study is to enable digitalized information management in food value chains, and this study aims to know which information needs to be considered for data-driven decision-making. The purpose and aim align with adapting to the current trends of industry 4.0 and digitalized information management. To fulfill the purpose, two research questions are formulated: (1) What type of information needs to be considered for data-driven decision-making in food value chains? and (2) How should the parts of the value chain be digitalized to enable data-driven decision-making in food value chains? 

    Method: The chosen approach for this study was an inductive approach and the chosen strategies were a literature review and a single case study in the Swedish food manufacturing industry. To gain an understanding of the case company’s value chain, interviews were used as a data collection technique. The interviews were then analyzed and then combined with the literature review to answer both the research questions. The quality of the study was evaluated by using thetrustworthiness criteria. There were also five principles, when it comes to research ethics, that were used during this study.  

    Findings: After the conducted interviews, the relevant actors were identified and mapped in the case company’s value chain. It was found that the company used a lot of manual information management procedures, which led to several challenges for data-driven decision-making within the company. The mapping revealed which information was relevant for the respective actors within the case company. This provided a starting point from which empirical and theoretical data were studied to address these challenges and answer the two research questions and fulfill the purpose of this study.  

    Analysis: To build a framework for digital information management, it was necessary to customize existing equipment and resources, adapt the process to the specific industry, and move toward the concept of industry 4.0. With these elements in mind, the framework was created using data acquired from both the literature research and the case study. The framework consists of a loop, that allows for continual improvement.  

    Conclusion: Applying the correct technology is important for digitalized information management, and the food manufacturing industry suffers from limited technologies in this aspect. This thesis informs the reader on how to digitalize information management. The academic contribution is a theoretical framework for the digitalization of information management using industry 4.0 concepts, which can support companies to generate revenue.

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