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  • 1.
    Bergström, Adam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Jödicke, Luisa
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Reconfigurability Assessment Model: Assessment of a Manufacturing System's Current State2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s global market and growing competition set an increasing strain to manufacturing companies. Shorter product lifecycles automatically lead to shorter production ramp up periods and, therefore, set a higher strain on the manufacturing systems. The concept of reconfigurable manufacturing systems (RMS) was developed in the early 1990s and has now gained more interest than ever. An RMS is designed to quickly respond to changes in market demand, by adapting its functionality as well as its capacity to the current market requirements. In order to achieve this, an RMS is characterised by six core characteristics: modularity, integrability, diagnosability, convertibility, scalability and customisation. By complying with these characteristics, the manufacturing system can meet the required responsiveness to functionality and capacity changes. Academia has been focusing on the development and design of new RMSs, however, there is a lack in research on converting existing manufacturing systems towards reconfigurability. Additionally, few models assessing a manufacturing system’s current state in terms of reconfigurability are available in literature. The existing reconfigurability assessment models were proven to be rather theoretical and difficult to use by practitioners in industry. Therefore, the need for a reconfigurability assessment model applicable in industry arose. This study focuses on the analysis of enablers of a reconfigurability manufacturing systems as well as on assessing the reconfigurability of an existing manufacturing system in an industrial setting. For this purpose, a detailed reconfigurability assessment model has been developed, based on literature studies and a case study at a case company. A focus of the development of the model has been set on usability in industry. The outcome was an assessment model developed in Microsoft Excel that gives an overview on the reconfigurability of each characteristic as well as the manufacturing system’s overall reconfigurability. The model was subsequently tested and verified at the case company. The final reconfigurability assessment model is presented and explained at the end of this study. This study shows, that through the use of theory about RMS and input from industry it was possible to develop a current state assessment model regarding reconfigurability. To make the model generalisable and adaptable to different industrial settings, further testing in different manufacturing fields and research within RMS is required.

  • 2.
    Chandrashekar, Sharath
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Sawalekar, Vishal
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Forecast and Context Driven Sales & Operations Planning2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Devarakonda, Rakesh Raghavendra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Ramachandrareddy, Sumanth
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Production System waste reduction using Value stream mapping: An Industrial case study2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid rise in global population and market demands have mandated industries to introduce better and quality products to meet up their rushing needs. However, achiev-ing such goals need optimal production system and robust strategies. Exploring in depth it can be visualized that most of the manufacturing set ups suffers losses or relatively lower benefits due to improper and high wastages. Hence it is very important for man-ufacturing industries to explore the techniques which help them to improve their pro-duction system. The key techniques from Lean Manufacturing (LM) such as Value Stream Mapping (VSM) and Ishikawa diagram were explored in this work for enhanc-ing production capacity, reducing rework, reducing wastages and arriving to a well-defined optimal process flow which in turn help in achieving higher productivity. How-ever, the implementation of Lean and Value stream mapping depends on the production scale and has its own significance to different manufacturing setup. With that motive, in this thesis work the emphasis was made on exploring VSM technique for better pro-duction optimization in manufacturing sector.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Gusten
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Persson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Organisational ambidexterity in manufacturing SMEs: An empirical study of managers’ and workers’ perceptions of ambidextrous elements2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational ambidexterity is considered a key to company survival and performance. Despite this, organisational ambidexterity is still a poorly understood phenomenon, especially in an SME context. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate how the compliance with ambidextrous elements is perceived at different levels in manufacturing SMEs, to increase the understanding of organisational ambidexterity in this context. The empirical data was collected through a combination of questionnaire and interview. The case companies in this report perceive that they comply stronger with contextual elements than with structural elements. The strong compliance with contextual elements is motivated by the lack of hierarchies, flexibility in the company, different management structure and low number of employees. This allows employees to perform the contextual elements such as initiative-taking, cooperating, brokering and multitasking. The structural elements including e.g. vision, values, strategies, senior team responsibility and alignment are perceived differently at different  hierarchal levels, indicating that there are subcultures within the hierarchal levels within a company. The biggest difference can be found between the middle managers and the top managers,. Workers perceive that they are not included in explorationb within the company, and that the exploration occur more sporadically than those for exploitation. The definitions of exploration and exploitation vary between the companies which results in a lack of consensus. This makes it difficult for the companies to perform the changes necessary in order to develop and achieve long-term sustainable growth i.e. economical sustainability. The managerial implication of this report concerns four actions: (1) create a common definition for exploration, (2) develop goals for exploration, (3) communicate for buy-in and (4) involve all employees.

  • 5.
    Jonsson Egeman, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Adapting the lead time tree model to include immaterial activities: Extending the lead time tree model to enable mapping, efficiency evaluation and waste identification in order fulfillment processes2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Much research regarding efficiency in manufacturing industry has historically been focused on the material activities of the shop floor. However, companies that merely focus on material activities when trying to improve lead times, risk losing potential for improvements within immaterial activities such as planning, engineering, design, and purchasing, which often constitute the most time consuming parts of the order fulfillment processes. Engineer to order (ETO) products are particularly time consuming regarding their immaterial activities, and the customer is waiting for the products from the very beginning of the order fulfillment process. Shortening the lead time to customer for ETO products is therefore important for customer satisfaction.

    The aim of this study is to adapt an existing lead time tree model currently focused on material activities to also include immaterial activities, enabling a full visualization of all activities contained in order fulfillment processes. The lead time tree model would thereby be able to use as a tool when working on shortening the lead time to customer. A further aim of the study is to investigate how the adapted lead time tree model can be used in further areas as well, in addition to visualizing immaterial activities.

    The adaption of the lead time tree model has been based on the original literary source of the lead time tree model. The original lead time tree model has been analyzed towards theoretical data from a literature study, and towards empirical data about immaterial activities in order fulfillment processes for ETO products, from the case company Kongsberg Maritime Sweden AB (previously Rolls-Royce AB). The result of this has been an adapted lead time tree model that can visualize immaterial activities.

    Several adaptions of the original lead time tree model have been made for it to be able to visualize immaterial activities, while still keeping the basics of the original model. The adapted lead time tree model comprises information that is normally kept separated and that is important when planning and improving a process. Additional information that is needed for each specific case can also easily be included in the lead time tree. The adapted lead time tree model has proven to have additional areas of use within project planning, improvement work regarding lead time reduction and root-cause analysis, and as a boundary object for communication between internal actors and between internal and external actors.

    The adapted lead time tree model is presumably able to map and visualize immaterial activities in other fields of business as well, other than manufacturing, as the nature of immaterial activities remains the same across business environments.

  • 6.
    Sege, Victoria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Balta, Pelda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Benefits & barriers of implementing reconfigurable jigs: A study in offsite manufacturing of unique house elements in Sweden2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to identify the enablers, barriers and benefits of implementing reconfigurable jigs in the off-site manufacturing of unique house elements. Due to de- mands on customization, volume and lowering the cost, there is a need to increase flex- ibility in the industry. The paper focuses on mainly two phases of implementation, which are manufacturing, design and engineering.

    The research questions are answered by applying a single case study method, taking place in a Swedish house manufacturing company. The study consists of four different techniques – interviews, time study, observations, and questionnaire which are sup- ported with an additional literature review. Hence, research questions are answered from a triangulation approach providing nuanced and dynamic perspectives.

    From observations and time study it is concluded that in current situation, changeover in manufacturing is time-consuming due to the difference in complexity of product var- iants, along with a complex and inefficient setup process that is not responsive to a changeable environment. Findings imply that the barriers in both phases include lack of knowledge about reconfigurability, communication, current capabilities of CAD sys- tems as well as training and education. Enablers are found to be awareness of the needs of improvements, long-term mindset and working with product platforms. The benefits of implementing reconfigurable jigs include a reduction of setup time in manufacturing, better storage and sharing of information along with a better interpretation of that in- formation, a better structure in the organisation.

  • 7.
    Vijayakumar, Vivek
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Tom, Arun
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Lead a concept proof to use RFID technology in tracing of bulky goods in logistics: Bring Logistics, Torsvik2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
1 - 7 of 7
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