Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 88
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anderfelt, Filip
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Svensson, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stopp För Mekansiskt vevbord2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ROL Ergo is a company that manufactures and develops height-adjustable tables. Their product line-up consists mainly of electrically operated tables, but also a small-scale of tables where the height is determined by a hand-driven crank.

    One problem with ROL Ergos hand-operated crank table, PR25 2-column 2-stage crank, is the function of stopping the table after 470 mm which is the tables desired stroke. The solution the existing table have, to prevent this from happening, is a plastic stop mounted on top of the table’s outer legs.

    This plastic stop is intended to stop the table when the leg reaches its highest position. The hand crank used to change the height of the table have an integrated torque clutch which is used to prevent that the torque applied to the crank exceeds 4.3 Nm. However, the force applied to the plastic part that is generated by the hand crank is greater than what the plastic part is constructed for. This results in the stop being pushed out of its position and must be mounted back by hand, or in worst case, breaks.

    This report covers the steps taken to find a solution to this problem. Initially, the forces generated by the hand crank in the tables height adjustable system is needed. When these forces were calculated the process of finding concepts and solutions could begin. When a final concept was defined, the solution was verified with simulations and physical tests to ensure the concept’s stop function.

    Through this process the work resulted in a concept where a C formed ring is mounted onto the table’s thread bars. This ensures that the thread bars are prevented to thread further than the desired height. By using results from calculations, simulations and physical tests, the developed concept could be verified to withstand the forces generated by the hand crank in order to stop the table at the desired stroke.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Bridging product development and production using production requirements [blog post]2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Introductory paragraph: Imagine, beginning a day without that first cup of coffee. Pressing a button on the coffee machine makes the process so much easier. Imagine, being on different corners of the world away from your loved ones, how products such as mobile phones or computers bring them nearer to you. You are a person who enjoys spending time with your family, imagine the products makes the day-to-day activities simpler, saves you time to provide more opportunities for safer and quality time with the family. Products, they make our lives simpler, but product development is a complex process.

  • 3.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Supporting production preparation during product development using production requirements2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development is affected by uncertainties due to changing customer requirements, changing regulations, technological developments, long lead times, high product complexities, and geopolitical issues. Automation, increased flexibility of production, and reduced lead times are drivers that allow product development to be competitive in this scenario. Design engineers should be aware of production capabilities to facilitate early producibility assessments and to avoid late changes. Production preparation is identified as an important activity in the product development process, whereby the producibility of a product is assessed. In this thesis, the current state of production preparation during product development is investigated and a method is introduced supporting production preparation using production requirements. The work was carried out using the design research methodology framework and comprised four studies based on the four steps of the framework. The research clarification and descriptive study 1 phases aimed at developing understanding and were done by means of data collection at the companies through interviews and document studies. The next two steps were prescriptive study and descriptive study 2, which aimed at developing and evaluating the support. This was done through observation, workshops, and solution development. The production preparation process is supported by Design for Manufacturing and Assembly, failure mode and effects analysis, lesson-learnt documents, and computer-aided design, and the efficiency of the process is dependent on individual skills and knowledge. Tools to support common understanding, remove ambiguity in requirements, and enable collaboration between design and production engineers are needed. The developed method allows for the identification, definition, structuring, and sharing of production requirements, aligning with varying maturities of product and production systems during product development. This helps improve the collaboration between design and production engineers for production preparation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
    Download (png)
    Cover
  • 4.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    A method to capture and share production requirements supporting a collaborative production preparation process2023In: Proceedings of the Design Society: ICED23, Volume 3 - July 2023, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2023, Vol. 3, p. 273-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production preparation process (3P) enables collaboration between design and production engineers during product development but its efficiency is limited by the abundance of documentation of manufacturing constraints and capabilities. Empirical studies showed that use of production requirements can increase the efficiency of 3P, however, the support for production engineers to capture and share production requirements is scarce. A method to support production engineers in identifying, defining, structuring and sharing production requirements and collaborating with design engineers is presented. The method has three major parts - focus areas and requirement categories, a worksheet for production requirements capturing and prioritization, and a workflow for using the worksheet. The method was developed in collaboration with practitioners and contributes to the existing knowledge by providing production engineers with a structured way of working with production requirements. Evaluation of the method in the case company showed its usability when developing product variants and that additional work is needed to support the development of new product families and assembly lines.

  • 5.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Aligning Production Requirements with Product and Production Maturities: Enhancing Production Preparation during Product DevelopmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Design for Producibility: A Case Study on Theory, Practice and Gaps2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering: Proceedings of the 29th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2022) / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap & J. Stjepandić, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2022, p. 134-143Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changing customer requirements, regulations, technology and regulations, shift to automated assembly and product variety are common challenges faced by many manufacturing industries and alignment between product and production system is critical for business success. Design engineers should be aware of production constraints and capabilities to ensure efficient manufacture and assembly of products that are developed. This requires different and detailed support to guide the work, evaluate different design solutions, enable continuous and concurrent work with design for producibility and production preparation. A study was conducted in three companies to understand alignment and integration of product development and production preparation processes. Also, utilization of production requirements, design for manufacture and assembly (DFMA) and failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA) to support design for producibility (DFP) was studied. Currently, production preparation is done through discussions between design and production engineers. Production preparation and work with DFMA and FMEA is skill and experience dependent. Definition, structuring and sharing of production requirements on different system levels, from production and product perspectives are identified as critical to supporting design for producibility and production preparation. The work with FMEA and DFMA can be developed and improved with systematic and structured way of working with production requirements.

  • 7.
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Product Platforms and Production: Current State and Future Research Directions Targeting Producibility and Production Preparation2021In: Transdisciplinary Engineering for Resilience: Responding to System Disruptions: Proceedings of the 28th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2021) / [ed] L. Newnes, S. Lattanzio, B. R. Moser, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2021, p. 332-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New business opportunities are created when the advantage of changeable manufacturing systems expand beyond increased freedom in production location to increased freedom in product design. However, there are new challenges to overcome, including improved ability to design and adapt products when requirements from stakeholders quickly change and/or new technology rapidly evolves. Simultaneously, the producibility of each design must be ensured while keeping the lead-time of the whole process to the minimum. Changeable product platforms (both flexible and adaptable platforms) are gaining attention in both research and industry. However, the level of alignment and integration of product development and production is critical for the efficiency of the product realization process. In this study, we map the state of practice in five companies with an initial literature review. The companies had no formal platform strategy and faced challenges with variant management and development time, had manual processes for production preparation and reuse of technical solutions and knowledge happened through components and documents. The production preparation and reuse were dependent on the engineer’s competence. Future work will concentrate on identifying how manufacturing inputs can be added as a design asset in a changeable product platform to enhance producibility and production preparation.

  • 8.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohamma
    et al.
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Salomonsson, Kent
    School of Engineering Science, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Image regression-based digital qualification for simulation-driven design processes, case study on curtain airbag2023In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today digital qualification tools are part of many design processes that make them dependent on long and expensive simulations, leading to limited ability in exploring design alternatives. Conventional surrogate modelling techniques depend on the parametric models and come short in addressing radical design changes. Existing data-driven models lack the ability in dealing with the geometrical complexities. Thus, to address the resulting long development lead time problem in the product development processes and to enable parameter-independent surrogate modelling, this paper proposes a method to use images as input for design evaluation. Using a case study on the curtain airbag design process, a database consisting of 60,000 configurations has been created and labelled using a method based on dynamic relaxation instead of finite element methods. The database is made available online for research benchmark purposes. A convolutional neural network with multiple layers is employed to map the input images to the simulation output. It was concluded that the showcased data-driven method could reduce digital testing and qualification time significantly and contribute to real-time analysis in product development. Designers can utilise images of geometrical information to build real-time prediction models with acceptable accuracy in the early conceptual phases for design space exploration purposes.

  • 9.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Data-driven and real-time prediction models for iterative and simulation-driven design processes2022Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of more complex products has increased dependency on virtual/digital models and emphasized the role of simulations as a means of validation before production. This level of dependency on digital models and simulation togetherwith the customization level and continuous requirement change leads to a large number of iterations in each stage of the product development process. This research, studies such group of products that have multidisciplinary, highly iterative, and simulation-driven design processes. It is shown that these high-level technical products, which are commonly outsourced to suppliers, commonly suffer from a long development lead time. The literature points to several research tracks including design automation and data-driven design with possible support. After studying the advantages and disadvantages of each track, a data-driven approachis chosen and studied through two case studies leading to two supporting tools that are expected to improve the development lead time in associated design processes. Feature extraction in CAD as a way to facilitate metamodeling is proposed as the first solution. This support uses the concept of the medial axis to find highly correlated features that can be used in regression models. As for the second supporting tool, an automated CAD script is used to produce a library of images associated with design variants. Dynamic relaxation is used to label each variant with its finite element solution output. Finally, the library is used to train a convolutions neural network that maps screenshots of CAD as input to finite element field answers as output. Both supporting tools can be used to create real-time prediction models in the early conceptual phases of the product development process to explore design space faster and reduce lead time and cost.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
    Download (png)
    Cover
  • 10.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Salomonsson, Kent
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    A CAD-based image regression database enabling real-time prediction early in the design process, a case study on the airbag design processManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development.
    Data-driven and Real-time Prediction Models for Highly Iterative Product Development Processes2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap, J. Stjepandić, IOS Press, 2022, p. 463-472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some high-level technical products are associated with transdisciplinary simulation-driven design processes. Therefore, their design process involves many stakeholders and is prone to frequent changes, leading to a highly iterative process with a long lead time. Despite the decades of statistical approximations and metamodeling techniques on prediction models, companies are still striving toachieve fully automated real-time predictions in early design phases. The literature study shows a gap in existing methods such as not being fully real-time or suffering from high dimensionality. This paper presents a generic model for the development process of such described products and motivation for such modeling through a series of semi-structured interviews with an automotive sub-supplier company. The proposed process model points to the digital verification in every design loop as the bottleneck which is then confirmed by interviewees. As alternative solutions to overcome the problems, a method for data-driven and real-time prediction models is presented to enable the designer to foresee the consequence of their decision in the design phase. To evaluate the method, two examples of such real-time metamodeling techniques, developed in an ongoing research project are discussed. The proposed examples confirm that the framework can reduce lead time spent on digital verification and therefore accelerate the design process in such products.

  • 12.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Salomonsson, K.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering Science, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Cenanovic, Mirza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Balague, H.
    Autoliv AB, Vårgårda, Sweden.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Correlation-based feature extraction from computer-aided design, case study on curtain airbags design2022In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 138, article id 103634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many high-level technical products are associated with changing requirements, drastic design changes, lack of design information, and uncertainties in input variables which makes their design process iterative and simulation-driven. Regression models have been proven to be useful tools during design, altering the resource-intensive finite element simulation models. However, building regression models from computer-aided design (CAD) parameters is associated with challenges such as dealing with too many parameters and their low or coupled impact on studied outputs which ultimately requires a large training dataset. As a solution, extraction of hidden features from CAD is presented on the application of volume simulation of curtain airbags concerning geometric changes in design loops. After creating a prototype that covers all aspects of a real curtain airbag, its CAD parameters have been analyzed to find out the correlation between design parameters and volume as output. Next, using the design of the experiment latin hypercube sampling method, 100 design samples are generated and the corresponding volume for each design sample was assessed. It was shown that selected CAD parameters are not highly correlated with the volume which consequently lowers the accuracy of prediction models. Various geometric entities, such as the medial axis, are used to extract several hidden features (referred to as sleeping parameters). The correlation of the new features and their performance and precision through two regression analyses are studied. The result shows that choosing sleeping parameters as input reduces dimensionality and the need to use advanced regression algorithms, allowing designers to have more accurate predictions (in this case approximately 95%) with a reasonable number of samples. Furthermore, it was concluded that using sleeping parameters in regression-based tools creates real-time prediction ability in the early development stage of the design process which could contribute to lower development lead time by eliminating design iterations.

  • 13.
    Arjomandi Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    System properties to address the change propagation in product realization2020In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems – Real-life applications: Proceedings of the 27th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, Warsaw, Poland, 1-10 July 2020 / [ed] J. Pokojski, M. Gil, L. Newnes, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Clifton, VA: IOS Press, 2020, Vol. 12, p. 343-352Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demanding markets and complex products are only some of the reasons that make changes and variations inevitable through different stages of product realization. From early phases of product development to downstream production phase, these changes or variations cause failure either directly or by propagating to other phases, triggering more fluctuations like the well-known butterfly effect. In this paper, first, the definition of changes in product realization will be reviewed and then different papers and their classification on change related system properties (illites) will be discussed and compared. It was argued that considering a system-level view, one could trace these propagations in the systems as a result of not being robust, flexible, or adaptable, etc. Some of the ambiguity in this semantic field demonstrated and most repeated definitions are identified as the unanimous and agreed-upon definitions in the literature. In the end, a historical comparison of the three identified properties presented. The results of this study help us to understand the multidisciplinary nature of these propagations and identify their stemming turbulent environment. This will be used as a foundation for forthcoming research either to prevent these propagations or utilize their attributes in the product realization.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Dogea, Ramona
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Identifying challenges related to industry 4.0 in five manufacturing companies2021In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, no C, p. 328-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the 4th industrial revolution has resulted in significant improvement in the effectiveness of product and production development. Nowadays, research has been done focused on new technologies of integrated products and production platforms to support decision making in engineering processes. This means that there is the need to continuously explore different ways of integrating product and production platforms in industry. The aim of this paper is directed at finding the current state of practice in today´s industry with respect to their degree of automation. To make this achievable, a methodology based on the interactive research principles and the design research methodology is followed. As input data, six Swedish companies were interviewed in order to draw a picture of their challenges and needs for each lifecycle phase of selected products. The main contribution of this work is the identification of gaps in their product and production platforms as well as methods to address them. Struggling with understanding and adopting Industry 4.0, this paper also reviews the concepts and approaches related to digitalisation of product and production platforms. The results show that there are three application fields the companies have been facing: simulation and calculation, automation as well as data management. Within them, there are common aspects like lack of software tools, design and production automation, data migration and collection, or data handling in production. The findings of the study strongly suggest companies to adopt Industry 4.0 techniques to improve their product and production assets.

  • 15.
    Fagerberg, Erik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Josefsson, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    TORSIONALSTIFFNESS EVALUATION OF A TUBULARFRAME DEDICATED TO A THREEWHEELED SOLAR CAR2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Falk, Andreas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Sandin, Erik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Investigation of the C2C-certification and its potential on a car sun visor: A conceptual study2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes how a car sun visor can be designed in order to meet a sustainability certification called Cradle to Cradle Certified® (C2C). The thesis is a final project for the university program Mechanical Engineering: Product Development and Design at School of engineering, Jönköping University.

    The thesis is in a collaboration with Polestar, a performance electric car brand with the goal to build sustainable electric cars and help create a sustainable society. One way to take this sustainability work forward is to apply C2C certifications to their products. The aim of the project was therefore to present how a sun visor from a Polestar model would meet the C2C requirements, and to develop a concept and prototype that can potentially receive a C2C certification. The project also aimed to present important conclusions about how C2C affects the product development process.

    The project was divided into two main sections, one deeper study of C2C and one conceptual design study. The work began with examining the structure and requirements of C2C. These were then compared to Polestar’s sun visor. Several product development phases were carried out with Bootcamp bootleg and the C2C process to develop concepts that could meet C2C´s and Polestar´s requirements. The concepts were then presented to a focus group in order to select a concept for further development.

    The result is a conceptual sun visor that is well adapted for C2C. The concept has a big focus on sustainable and safe materials, functions for circularity, with an extra focus on a simple disassembly process. According to the project group, the concept is assessed to possess the potential for the third highest ranking in the C2C certification. The project also resulted in a prototype to present the concept, functions and materials.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Fasolo, Camilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Integration of DFMEA and PFMEA for enhanced co-development of product and production2022In: 2022 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM), IEEE, 2022, p. 1546-1550Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work strives to support companies overcoming their challenges in the New Product Development (NPD) by enhancing the co-development of product and production with the integration of Design and Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (respectively DFMEA and PFMEA). A literature review and a case study with two Swedish manufacturing companies help identifying challenges and opportunities to integrate DFMEA and PFMEA reviewing companies’ templates and guidelines and performing two workshops. The results contribute to the knowledge in the field of co-development of product and production.

  • 18.
    Fermér, Arvid
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Sliwa, Petrus
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Utveckling av tillbehör till batteriprodukter2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Forsén, Emelie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Helleblad, Ingrid
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Ergonomisk modifiering av häcksax: Utveckling av det främre handtaget2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Hedge trimmers are used every day by professional users. Because of the hedges different sizes and shapes, the users’ needs to move in many different uncomfortable movements that are not ergonomic or gentle for the body. If the same motion is performed during a longer period with a heavier object, it will wear on joints and muscles that can lead to bigger risks in the future. With an improved ergonomic design in the handle of the hedge trimmers, it can prevent future problems that may arise. 

    In a collaboration between Husqvarna Group and Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola, a new front handle will be designed for one of Husqvarna’s hedge trimmers. The new handle shall give a better ergonomic experience for the wrist and shoulder to decrease the risk for injuries. The project is a further development on a previous project between Husqvarna and Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola from the fall of 2022. The results from the previous project were a vertical handle that could rotate and had five different positions just like the rear handle. The solution for the rotation mechanism is located and the bottom of the handle, which means that to be able to switch position you either need to use two hands or put down the hedge shear on the ground. In this project the rotation mechanism needs to be improved so only one hand is needed to change position. 

    To come up with the result theories have been analyzed and different methods are used. The theories have resulted to get a better understanding about how ergonomics works. The project has gone through a concept generation to get a final concept that can later be modeled up in CAD and then be printed with a SLS 3D-printer to a prototype. Various tests are implemented to get a better validation on the prototype and then it can be compared with the original handle. 

    This project has come to conclusion that a vertical handle with five positions in different angles should be used. The vertical handle is chosen so that the wrist will be in its neutral position for improved ergonomics. The rotation button is located at the top of the handle. By pressing it down, the handle is released and free to rotate and switch position. A protective cover is integrated into the handle so that it follows in every position and always protects the hand from the cutting bar to meet the requirements from the EU-standards for hedge trimmers. 

  • 20.
    Frank, Olle
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Klippfors, Hugo
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Utveckling av exo-skelett till skogshuggare2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport omfattar ett examensarbete skriven för Husqvarna AB av Hugo Klippfors och Olle Frank. Arbetet ägde rum under vårterminen 2023 på Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola. Examensarbetet är den avslutande delen på skribenternas högskoleingenjörsutbildning inom maskinteknik med inriktning produktutveckling och design.Under de senaste åren har aktiviteten på marknaden kring exo-skelett ökat. Både passiva och aktiva exo-skelett till flera olika marknader som logistik, hantverk och inommedicinbranschen existerar, där ett exo-skeletts funktion är att ge ergonomiskt stöd åt muskler och leder. Skogshuggare är ett yrke som är drabbat av bland annat ländryggsbesvär och trots att motorsågar ändrat design och vikten blivit lättare med åren, har besvären kvarstått. Det finns därför behov av förändring på marknaden. På Chalmers tekniska högskola skrevs 2022 ett examensarbete i samarbete med Husqvarna. Målet var att undersöka om exo-skelett skulle kunna minska risken för skador och ett koncept togs fram. Lösningen i fråga tas vid i detta examensarbete, med målet att utvärdera konceptet samt utveckla en prototyp, för att Husqvarna ska kunna utvärdera om detta är något för deras framtida sortiment.Rapporten följer metoder med en produktutvecklingsprocess som innefattar planering, förstudie, produktframtagning, utvärdering med konceptval samt prototypframtagning. Processens metoder och bakomliggande teorier definieras i rapportens gång, som sedan ligger till grund för slutresultatet. De krav och begränsningar som produkten ska utgå ifrån har tagits fram tillsammans med Husqvarna. Detta genom en marknadsanalys ochett antal fokusgrupper som har hållits tillsammans med grupper som Quality Assurance på företaget. Även intervjuer har hållits, samt en konkurrents produkt har testats och evaluerats.Arbetet resulterar slutligen i en färdig prototyp som avlastar ländryggen vid framåtlutande bål. Prototypen ska kunna testas ute i fält av skogshuggare och vidareutveckling för Husqvarna ges förslag på.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Gasic, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Hållbara ersättningsmaterial: Studie innehållande förslag på hållbara ersättningsmaterial till Handledsortos2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Extended product models supporting multidisciplinary design automation2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing organizations often pursue the ability to efficiently and effectively provide custom products for its competitive advantage. Research has shown product configuration to be an effective way of achieving this goal through a modularization, product platform, and product family development approach. A core assumption behind this approach is that the module variants and their constraints are explicitly pre-defined as product knowledge. This is not always the case, however. Many companies require extensive engineering to develop each module variant but cannot afford to do so proactively to meet potential customer requirements within a predictable future. Instead, they attempt to implicitly define the module variants in terms of the process in which they can be realized. In this way, manufacturing companies develop module variants on demand efficiently and effectively when customer requirements are better defined, as justified by the increased probability of profiting from the outcome.

    Design automation (DA), in its broadest definition, refers to computerized engineering support that efficiently and effectively utilizes pre-planned reusable assets to progress a design process. The literature has reported several successful implementations of DA, but especially widespread higher levels of automation are yet to be seen. One DA approach involves the explicit representation of engineering process and product knowledge in the engineers preferred formats, such as computer scripts, parametric geometry models, and template spreadsheets. These design assets are developed using various computer tools, maintained within the different disciplines involved, such as design, simulation, or manufacturing, and are dependent on each other through the product model. To implement, utilize, and manage DA systems in or across multiple disciplines, it is important to understand how the disciplinary design assets depend on each other throughout the product model and how these relations should be constructed to support users without negatively affecting other aspects, such as modeling flexibility, system transparency, and software tool independence.

    To support the successful implementation and management of DA systems, this work focuses on understanding how digital product model constituents are, can, and, to some extent, should be extended to concretize relations toward and between design assets from different tools and disciplines. This research consists of interviews with Swedish industrial companies, technical reviews, literature reviews, and prototype developments, resulting in an increased understanding and the consequent development of a framework that highlights aspects regarding the choice and development of extension techniques.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
    Download (png)
    presentationsbild
  • 23.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Transparency of design automation systems using visual programming – within the mechanical manufacturing industry2021In: Proceedings of the Design Society, Cambridge University Press , 2021, Vol. 1, p. 3249-3258Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One challenge with design automation is system transparency with adjustable granularity because of the many different forms of representation from multiple disciplines. Previous research has focused on visualization through the generation of graphs, packaging into electronic books, and model highlighting. The research presented in this paper focuses instead on a visual programming approach, commonly applied in the building industry, where design assets and external references are wrapped into visual components and managed on a canvas with information input/output relations displayed. This entails additional documentation efforts, but the visualization is arguably more useful as groups and levels of granularity are adjusted by the engineers themselves as a part of the development work. To explore visual programming and its potential benefits as a way of enabling transparency with adjustable granularity of DA systems within mechanical manufacturing industry, an existing textual design automation system was transformed into a visual one using Grasshopper® (a visual programming environment) and discussed with respect to DA system transparency, feature-based CAD, and DA system development.

  • 24.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Johansson, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Multidisciplinary design automation – A conceptual framework for working with product model extensions2020In: International Journal of Agile Systems and Management, ISSN 1741-9174, E-ISSN 1741-9182, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 28-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design automation can be used to support efficient information handling and knowledge processing in computer-based product modelling, as well as make possible new design exploration and optimisation capabilities. To be able to utilise and manage design automation systems over time, it is important to understand how the disciplinary methods and models are dependent on each other through the product model constituents and then how these relations should be built to support maintenance, leveraging and future reuse. Awareness of the concrete representation of relations could support the system's traceability and transparency, and depending on the chosen technique, comprehension and extendability can be affected. This paper presents a conceptual framework for how a set of product model constituents are, can and to some extent, should be extended to define relations in multidisciplinary design automation systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 25.
    Heikkinen, Tim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Extended Product Models – Dealing with Topological Changes and System TransparencyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Matsushita, Taishi
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Siafakas, Dimitrios
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    On the nature of the anisotropy of Maraging steel (1.2709) in additive manufacturing through powder bed laser-based fusion processing2021In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 204, article id 109608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing is growing rapidly as a manufacturing method. Additive manufacturing is a rapid solidification process and may, as such, generate new microstructures with an improvement of mechanical properties compared to conventional manufacturing. The repeatability and deeper understanding of properties repeatability for both mechanical and thermophysical properties are not well-established. In the current study, a complete analysis of the nature of the anisotropy is experimentally analysed to provide input for better understanding of the printing process and the resulting properties as reliability and predictability are important factors to build trust in a new manufacturing process.

  • 27.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Sevastopol, Ruslan
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    Seshendra, Karamchedu
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    Zhang, Qing
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Steggo, Jacob
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    On the Use of Conformal Cooling in High-Pressure Die-Casting and Semisolid Casting2021In: Technologies, E-ISSN 2227-7080, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, tool life in high pressure die casting (HPDC) is of growing interest. A common agreement is that die life is primarily decided by the thermal load and temperature gradients in the die materials. Conformal cooling with the growth of additive manufacturing has raised interest as a means of extending die life. In the current paper, conformal cooling channels’ performance and effect on the thermal cycle in high-pressure die casting and rheocasting are investigated for conventional HPDC and semisolid processing. It was found that conformal cooling aids die temperature reduction, and the use of die spray may be reduced and support the die-life extension. For the die filling, the increased temperature was possibly counterproductive. Instead, it was found that the main focus for conformal cooling should be focused to manage temperature around the in-let bushing and possibly the runner system. Due to the possible higher inlet pressures for semisolid casting, particular benefits could be seen.

  • 28.
    Jarfors, Anders E.W.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Shashidhar, Akash C. G. H.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Yepur, Hrushi K.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Steggo, Jacob
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Andersson, Nils-Eric
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing.
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Build strategy and impact strength of slm produced maraging steel (1.2709)2021In: Metals, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-20, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current paper aimed to study the impact properties of additively manufactured maraging steel (1.2709) using laser powder bed fusion (PBF-L) processing. The specimens were fabricated using 3D Systems ProX 300 equipment under constant specific power input, or Andrew number. The interactions between the build strategy and parameters such as hatch spacing and scan speed was, and the impact strength and fracture were investigated. The impact energy anisotropy was also investigated in parallel and perpendicular to the build direction. Instrumented impact testing was performed, and the fractography supported that the fusion zone geometry dictated the fracture behavior. The influence from gaseous elements such as nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen was found insignificant at the levels found in the printed material. 

  • 29.
    Johansson, Maja
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Persson, Alexandra
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Vidareutveckling av djurtransportbox: Produktutveckling och FEM-beräkning2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sigma Industry South AB in Jönköping is a consulting company that helps the production companies of Jönköping’s region with different consultancy services within product development, industrial design, process technology, calculation, production systems and project management. Husqvarna AB, Fagerhult, Thule Group and Saab AB are examples of companies that buy consulting services from Sigma in Jönköping. This bachelor thesis is performed without a specific company; however, the project has earlier been performed with the company Etebra Maskin & Vagn AB in the course “Industrial placement course”. The starting points in this project are based on what Etebra wished for and wanted to achieve in the last project, but this time without their influence on decisions.

    Etebra is a sales and development company that are aimed at customers in farming, municipalities and industries. The CEO of Etebra, thought that the market was lacking a well-developed animal transport box that also can be delivered in flat packages and wanted Etebra to be the first company to develop this. An animal transport box can be used by farmers when transporting a smaller quantity of animals within the farm. Big animal transport carriage is used frequently today even if only a small quantity of animals is to be transported, which is more inflexible than using a box. The desire from Etebra was to have an animal transport box which is built in a number of modules to reduce shipping costs and to be able to deliver a larger number of boxes at the same time. They also had requirements that the box should be in the same standard as their own big animal transport carriage named MOVA, which is very quiet and easy to use. The floor is built up with pressure impregnated decking with a rubber mat on it and the walls are made of Marin plywood. These materials make the animal transport quieter than sheet metal walls and becomes a safer environment both for the animals but also for the farmer, because scared animals can be dangerous to work with in a closed environment.

    This project will not just be a further development of the original construction. Strength calculations, costs and detail development on new functions will be a big part of the project. The project is built using the design process The Mechanical Design Process of David G. Ullman and different phases of the process. The phases contain parts such as field research, competitor analysis, material analysis, design specifications, idea generation, CAD, solidity calculations, FEM-analysis and cost calculations. The last four parts are made both in the material aluminum and the material steel to answer the thesis’ questions. 

    The final product is made of steel and has some changes from the original constructions, the final product also weighs less but still meets the solidity requirements which can be seen both in manual calculations and FEM-analysis.  Another reason why steel was chosen is because of the cost calculations that is made, steel is cheaper than aluminum. Except for a iteration of the original construction, some sub- and support functions are made such as divider, hooks, mounts and reflexes. These sub- and support functions are included in design specifications and are requirements or wishes both from Etebra and farmers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Vidareutveckling-av-djurtransportbox_Maja-Johansson_Alexandra-Persson
  • 30.
    Johansson, Rasmus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Söderberg, Johannes
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Portable Power-Supply: Framtidens lösning för kommersiella robotgräsklippare.2023Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globe technologies is a company that sells products in the gardening market for both commercial and professional use. This study focuses on developing a battery powered accessory for autonomous mowers. The study investigates the possibility to use autonomous mowers in green spaces that do not have access to power by the grid. To provide the autonomous mower with power the study introduces a portable power supply that provides power to the mower.  The development of the portable power supply starts with a market analysis and that lays the foundation for the project. The report continues with the development of the actual product and finishes off with testing of a prototype. To get the product that is wanted relevant theories and methods is investigated and applied. During the thesis a number of iterations of the product are designed to meet the demands of the requirement specification.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Portable Power Supply
  • 31.
    Jonsson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    A case-based reasoning method including tooling function for case retrieval and reuse in stamping tooling design2023In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 839-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design of sheet metal forming tooling is currently based on that experienced tooling designers with good knowledge of how stamping tools previously have been designed and operated in production, apply their knowledge when making a new design. For retrieving former designs, they often need to rely on their good memory. In this paper, an automatic method for retrieving relevant former cases is presented. A major challenge is defining the similarity between the current and the former cases i.e., finding the relevant parameters to include in the CBR (Case-based reasoning) search. This is here addressed by using CAD model parameters both from former components and the tooling for their production. By interviewing tooling designers in industry, a set of relevant parameters has been identified. To arrive at the correct weight of each parameter, a genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the search results. This resulted in a quick and automated way of retrieving the most relevant former cases and presenting them to the designer. The method has been tested on actual cases with promising results. This has the potential of making sheet metal part and tooling design less reliant on memory and experience.

  • 32.
    Jonsson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Design knowledge reuse in design of progressive stamping tools: A qualitative study2021In: Proceedings of the Design Society , Volume 1 , August 2021, Cambridge University Press, 2021, Vol. 1, p. 1053-1062Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Progressive stamping tools are widely used in mass-production of sheet metal components and their performance is critical as the design of the tool impact the cost of the manufactured component significantly. Knowledge reuse is an important part of successful design in general, and in progressive stamping tool design in particular. In the study described in this paper, 8 tool designers from 5 different Swedish companies were interviewed about (1) at what points in the tool design process they search for previously designed tools for information and knowledge reuse, (2) under what conditions and for what reasons does this reuse take place, and (3) what types of information and knowledge are sought for at each point. The results show that reuse of information and knowledge from previously designed tools happens in many parts of the tool design process. The reasons and conditions for reuse vary depending on where in the process the designer is. High component complexity is one example of a common factor triggering reuse. Also, information about the performance of the tool is important to tool designers, as they only want to reuse information and knowledge from tools with good performance and low maintenance.

  • 33.
    Jonsson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Method for Task-based Model Retrieval for Reuse in Stamping Tool Design2022In: CAD'22 Proceedings, 2022, p. 189-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Shorter lead-times are a constant driver for improving efficiency in the design and manufacturing of stamping tools for sheet metal components. Finding and reusing past solutions in design is an important way for improving efficiency and quality in stamping tool development. This can be done in the form of retrieving CAD-models of relevant past tooling designs. This type of knowledge reuse is standard practice among tool designers through remembering past problems, and solutions from previous projects, or having a collection of good examples of tools of different varieties, to reuse solutions from. Automatically indexing and retrieving relevant CAD-models of the tools can enable the tool designers to conduct the search more systematically and automatically. Retrieving relevant similar CAD-models automatically, however, has some challenges regarding how similarity should be defined, as geometric similarity is ill-defined [4]. A relevant metric of similarity depends on the application context, the objective, and what knowledge that the designer is searching for [3].

    In this work, focus is on variations in the different use cases and situations of the stamping tool design process. The existing work done in the application to stamping tools has provided retrieval mechanisms for blanking dies [1], deep drawn features [6], and overall similarity [5]. In the stamping tool design process, the information and knowledge sought for at different stages are different in nature [2] and require individual similarity metrics and parameters to be effective. An example of this is that, the relevant CAD-models to retrieve when designing the functionality for part ejection from the tool is different from the relevant models when designing forming dies of the same tool.

  • 34.
    Jonsson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stolt, Roland
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Stamping tools for sheet metal forming: Current state and future research directions2020In: Transdisciplinary engineering for complex socio-technical systems – Real-life applications: Proceedings of the 27th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, Warsaw, Poland, 1-10 July 2020 / [ed] J. Pokojski, M. Gil, L. Newnes, J. Stjepandić & N. Wognum, Clifton, VA: IOS Press, 2020, Vol. 12, p. 281-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sheet metal forming tools play an important role in the manufacturing of many products. With shorter product life cycles and demand for shorter time to market for new products, the process for design and manufacturing of stamping tools becomes a critical part. Stamping dies are often designed and manufactured by smaller, specialized companies. For a tooling company, knowledge and experience is an important competitive advantage. Traditionally the design process has been characterized by being based on few key individuals with much experience and craftsmanship. To stay competitive in this market there is a need for more efficient processes, systems, tools and supports in order to become more industrialized. This paper presents results from a study of the state of practice in industry within progressive stamping tool design as well as a review of relevant literature. The design and manufacturing processes for stamping dies in six companies have been investigated through semi-structured interviews, from which the main challenges in the current state for the companies are identified. The results from the interviews was analyzed and compared to the established concepts and frameworks of methods found in the literature review. The results and analysis points in the direction of efforts needed in supporting the formalization and reuse of information and knowledge from previous tool projects and production, especially during the critical steps of tool process planning and creating the tool layout.

  • 35.
    Katturajan, Mano Kannan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Volvo Group of Truck Technologies, Gothenburg..
    WAP, Thamel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing - Surface technology. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD). Volvo Group of Truck Technologies, Gothenburg..
    Assessment of Corrosion-Resistant Anodic Aluminium Oxide Coating2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to investigate the quality of the anodic oxide coating of twotypes of aluminium alloy samples, EN AW-6014 and EN AC-43100, and to identifyappropriate test methods to assess their corrosion resistance properties. The corrosionbehaviors of the anodic oxide coating of the selected aluminium alloys with the surfacestage as-is, anodized, and anodized & scratched are evaluated through standardizedclimate chamber tests, standardized and non-standardized immersion tests, non-standardized climatic cycle tests, and electrochemical tests. The form and extent ofcorrosion that occurs on the alloy samples after the tests are evaluated by visualappearance,surfacemorphology,andthroughcomparisonofcross-sectionalmicroscopic images of samples taken before the test. This study found that impedancetests were easy and quick test methods to check the quality of the anodic oxide layer.The study also concluded that the cyclic testing in artificial seawater and immersiontest in natural seawater at 28 ºC are the most appropriate test methods to assess thecorrosion behavior of the anodic oxide coating of aluminium alloys due to theircapability of identifying the significant differences between surface stages compared tothe pre-test samples.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Assessment of Corrosion-Resistant Anodic Aluminium Oxide Coatings
  • 36.
    Lagesson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Jonasson, Aron
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Fogkoncept för aluminium & galvaniserat stål: Anpassat för elektrifierat semesterfordon2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nufotec is a company that works with mechanical design and product development. The company has worked with a Tranås based company called Inzile in the past. Inzile has built small electrified trucks in the past but are now going to start development of electrified resort vehicles. In 2022 Inzile was acquisitioned by a Spanish company which got Inzile to change track and because they had never built a vehicle like this before, Nufotec was tasked to help.

    Nufotec works with many parts on the project and the large project has been scaled down to smaller parts, which are to be combined to generate a good final product. The project group who writes this study has been assigned a part problem on the large project. The part problem which this study points to, is to join a superstructure of aluminum and a galvanized steel structure. The result which is to be presented is two to three final concepts where joining method, corrosion and loads are considered. 

    The study revealed a large risk of corrosion and because of this a decision was made to eliminate this risk, the decision was to isolate all dissimilar metals from each other. Different joining methods was considered in the study, and it appeared that bolted joints were the best. To test the different concepts, they were put through FEM simulations. This shows where stress and deformation will occur and gives an estimate of what the concepts can withstand. After the simulations, the concepts went into an elimination matrix and the two remaining are the final concepts. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Examensarbete
  • 37.
    Lennartsson, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Sandkuhl, Kurt
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Seigerroth, Ulf
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Modularisation Metrics - Contrasting Industrial Practice and State-of-Research2022In: Proceedings of the Design Society: Volume 2: design2022, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022, p. 2483-2492Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many industrial sectors, modularization of products and services is considered as an important contribution to increased efficiency and competitiveness. Research has developed many modularization approaches, however, there is a gap between industrial practice in modularization and state-of-research in this field, which partly is due to shortcomings in "measuring"the value and state of modularization. This papers contribution is an analysis of industrial real-world cases to contrast practice and research, and a compilation of metrics in the context of modular product design from research. 

  • 38.
    Lennartsson, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Sandkuhl, Kurt
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics. University of Rostock.
    Seigerroth, Ulf
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    The complex reality of modularization: towards an approach for a business-driven modularization of smart products2023In: Leveraging transdisciplinary engineering in a changing and connected world: Proceedings of the 30th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, Hua Hin Cha Am, Thailand, July 11–14, 2023, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2023, p. 52-61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article is to structure and clarify the transdisciplinary reality of modularization as a foundation for handling business-driven modularization of smart products. Lately, the complexity has increased in the industry due to global manufacturing, different customer requirements, legal requirements, digitalization, new business models, and the evolvement of smart products. The increasingly complex reality has been acknowledged on an enterprise engineering level where complexity is one part of different grand challenges for enterprises. This complexity needs to be handled both horizontally (in the whole value chain) and vertically (on all management levels). It is therefore essential to clarify the modularization landscape by bringing together the business domain, and the engineering domain to cater for the future of modularization. The main contribution of this paper is to suggest a conceptualization of the modularization domain through a meta-model that covers essential aspects of business-driven modularization of smart products.

  • 39.
    Lennartsson, Dan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Seigerroth, Ulf
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Sandkuhl, Kurt
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    An Approach Towards Operationalization of Modularization Interfaces for Industrial Product Development2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap, J. Stjepandić, IOS Press, 2022, p. 3-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specification of interfaces is critical in modularization and product architecture development. Literature defines product architecture as (1) the arrangement of functional elements, (2) the mapping from functional elements to physical components (3) the specification of the interfaces between interacting physical components. However, other scholars state that interfaces should include more than physical components, such as spatial, material, energy, and information exchange. This view has been extended to include attachment, transfer, control and communication, power, spatial, field, and environmental interfaces. However, to use interfaces through the product lifecycle and reuse them between product architectures and generations, there must be an approach to handle applicable interfaces in a company. This research contributes by presenting a way to operationalize (investigate an abstract concept, it's essential to make it measurable and tangible) interfaces by introducing interface requirements that are definable, measurable, definable, and testable properties as a part of the interface development process and interface description. The method is illustrated by applying it in an industrial case study.

  • 40.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    André, Samuel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    PLM support for design platforms in industrialized house-building2023In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 265-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this research is to support the customization ability for industrial house building companies striving to offer individualized products but with a strategy which includes a production facility. This is accomplished by analyzing the as-is state in terms of existing engineering assets and by proposing a to-be state using the design platform and product lifecycle management (PLM) support.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study is based on design research methodology and collected data are in-depth interviews, document reviews and workshops and method development. The theoretical baseline is product platforms and the design platform.

    Findings

    The analysis showed that despite use of a platform, inherent assets are disorganized. Still, the identified object-based engineering assets were possible to include in a conceptual proposal for better management, both in the process and product view, using an asset relationship matrix and a PLM system.

    Practical implications

    The results should be applicable for industrial house building and off-site construction companies and offers an approach to identify and manage their assets and platforms which are crucial to stay competitive.

    Originality/value

    Previous research on design platforms has focused on engineer-to-order companies within the mechanical industry. The contribution of this paper lies in the application and support of the design platform for industrial house building and the introduction of PLM system support.

  • 41.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Analysis of product development connected to production for industrialized housebuilding2023In: Leveraging transdisciplinary engineering in a changing and connected world: Proceedings of the 30th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering, Hua Hin Cha Am, Thailand, July 11–14, 2023 / [ed] P. Koomsap, A. Cooper & J. Stjepandić, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2023, p. 112-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized housebuilding (IHB) is a sector within the construction trade where product platforms have been introduced from the mechanical industry to manage the product architecture and allow mass customization. The aim of this study is to analyze product development projects connected to the product platform and the production. For IHB, the backbone is a technical platform where components are designed and combined. Clients are satisfied, avoiding compromising the technical platform and the product architecture of the different variants. However, the adaptation to production is decisive and production has increased automation, with less flexibility in relation to the products. Still, product development has focused on the engineering view and the development of building components which fit in the predefined or well-established production facility while at the same time satisfy customer demands, i.e., maintaining the balance between distinctiveness and commonality. The study has observed one IHB company and two of their development projects focusing on changes in the product architecture for components across several of their product families. The development has been carried out in a bottom-up fashion. The results indicate difficulties in finding solutions, which fit production. An integrated design of production obstructs product development; the selection of project participants may affect the project results, both in terms of prior experience but also the problem-solving ability; the lack of project documentation is costly since experience is not captured, which could be recycled in future developments.

  • 42.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Raudberget, Dag
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Production development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Areth Koroth, Rohith
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Exploring the Technical Platform in Industrialized Housebuilding for Robust Product Architecture2022In: Transdisciplinarity and the Future of Engineering: Proceedings of the 29th ISTE International Conference on Transdisciplinary Engineering (TE2022) / [ed] B. R. Moser, P. Koomsap & J. Stjepandić, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2022, p. 33-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved resource efficiency, in industry and throughout the product life cycle, is a challenge and potentially, integrated product and production platforms can act as support. The aim of this study is to explore the current state of the technical platform in two industrialized housebuilding (IHB) companies from a mixed product architecture perspective. The study is part of a collaboration also involving three manufacturing companies and one IT provider. The research is crossing borders by means of interactive research and transdisciplinary engineering, and more than 50 practitioners and 13 researchers with competences in product management, engineering design, computational engineering, software development, production development, testing, quality, sourcing, and project management have been involved. Product platforms have been introduced in IHB to better control mixed product architectures and allow mass customization. Commonly, there is a technical platform for product architecture management, and a process platform for production management. High customization levels have resulted in an increasing number of variants not efficiently utilizing the technical platform. The results show that strong clients have negative influence on the technical platform while offering multiple products may facilitate simpler management of the technical platform but makes it more difficult to make changes and improvements.

  • 43.
    Lázaro García, Julia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    DESIGN OF SET DISPLAYS FOR BREAD AND BAKERY IN GROCERY STORES2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Master thesis carried out in collaboration with PS Retail, a retail design company from Jönköping, during the spring semester of 2022 as a part of the Industrial Design Master at Jönköping University.

    This project describes the process of design, development and construction of a module focused on the bread and bakery department in grocery stores for EveryDay Sweden, a partner of PS Retail.

    It consists of the development of a new versatile and contemporary assortment of displays that fit the interior of grocery stores, more specifically, for the bread and bakery department. Some of their approaches are to anticipate how supermarkets will evolve over time and design accordingly. In addition, they want the space to be comfortable for everyone, so some ergonomic factors are taken into account. Finally, their goal is to expand to other European markets, so both aesthetics and function must be considered.

    The final result is a module for bread storage and some proposals on how to fit in different environments. It works similar to a drawer, except that when the customer pulls it, the glass is lifted and the bread is exposed. In addition, the proposals represent how this module would look in different shapes and environments, depending on the capacity of the store.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Löfving, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Melander, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Organization, Leadership, Strategy and Entrepreneurship.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Andersson, D.
    Borand AB, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Implementing Hoshin Kanri in small manufacturing companies2021In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 304-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to develop knowledge on the implementation of Hoshin Kanri (HK) in small manufacturing companies. Two research questions are addressed: (1) what factors influence the implementation of HK in small manufacturing companies? (2) How do the factors influence the implementation of HK in small manufacturing companies? Design/methodology/approach: The research presented in this paper is based on an extensive literature review and data from the implementation process in five small manufacturing companies. In the literature review, factors influencing the implementation of HK, lean production and total quality management (TQM) in small manufacturing firms are identified. Thereafter, five implementation cases are analyzed. Findings from the cases are then contrasted with the factors identified in the literature and further theorized. Findings: Seven factors were found to either enable or hamper HK implementation in small manufacturing companies. Management involvement was identified as a critical factor. Management involvement can be typologized as collaborative or demanding, and the types of involvement is decisive in implementation processes within the small manufacturing company context. Originality/value: In this paper, the authors focus on small manufacturing companies as the starting point and relate theoretical and practical results to the implementation processes in this defined target group. Conceptualizing implementation as a learning process, this research contributes to this emerging perspective on small firm development.

  • 45.
    Mastroianni, Benjamin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Babic, Oliver
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    ElectroFlex: Concept design of a tool lanyard with integrated power cable.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For a company that focuses on the use of battery power, the integration into fossil fuel dominated markets can be challenging.  In order to help with integration into new markets, Globe Group AB are developing job-essential accessories that are compatible with their tools and batteries. The purpose of  the work done in this thesis was to develop a concept for a tool lanyard with an integrated electrical cable that is compatible with Globe Group AB’s current line of power tools. During this project it was decided that the research and testing would be conducted and analyzed based off high altitude tree work done by arborists. 

     

    This thesis focuses on the evaluation of research and testing to aid in concept design. A large focus was laid on the implementation of physical testing into early research and development stages, in an attempt to increase the validity of design decisions. The project was carried out by doing preliminary research and testing in order to gain information and metrics that could be used in the concept and prototype design stages. The prototypes were tested and compared to data collected prior in the project, to make statements about the feasibility of the concept and it’s included features. The result of this project was a final concept that includes all features that were deemed necessary through research and testing, a physical prototype, and test data to offer proof of concept.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    mehmood, Saad
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Design and Development of an impeller for 100% PVM: Design and Development of an impeller for 100% PVM for Radinn Hydro Jet.2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project aims to design and develop hydro jet which is integrated to Electric motor, whichis limited to run at 70% PWM. Which limits the efficiency of the system, to make an efficientsystem, hydro jet parameters are not defined which are desired to be defined by design fourimpellors for basic Radinn G2x Jet Pack design. The impellors will be four expected points inHydro Jet and final impellor is assumed to lie between these design points, to find the finalspecifications of the hydro jet, the hydro jet will be designed, using computational fluiddynamics they will be analysed. After analysis, they will be manufactured and tested in poolfacility where MGM controller will be used to measure the numerical data from electric circuitwhich powers the system to analyse the performance parameters to finalize the validity of 100% PWM. Microsoft Excel is used to calculate the Hydro Jet Geometric parameters, which areused in Solid Works, where parametric modelling is used to design impellors based ongeometric parameters calculated in Excel. Using Computational fluid dynamics hydro jetperformance is simulated and analysed. To validate the design further, prototypes aremanufactured and tested using workshop pool testing facility using MGM software. As a result,four hydro jet points are calculated, analysed and tested, four pumps are designed for specificflow rate, velocity and torque is calculated for four hydro jets. They are calculated and verifiedusing computational fluid dynamics, as a result flow rate, velocity and torques are calculatedfor all four hydro jets. Four impellors are manufactured and then tested in Radinn work shopand as a result current, power and rpm of the hydro jets are measured using MGM software.From power, rpm and current the torque can be calculated, while rpm is compared againstpredicted computational fluid dynamics results. The results from this project is limited toRadinn G2x jet pack, motor and other parts of the hydro jet’s Jet pack are standard parts

  • 47.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Andersson, David
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Fjellstedt, Fredrik
    Hoshin Kanri.
    Löfving, Malin
    Träcentrum Nässjö Kompetensutveckling AB.
    Implementing Hoshin Kanri: How to Manage Strategy Through Policy Deployment and Continuous Improvement2022Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses on the implementation of Hoshin Kanri. It is a response to most books on strategic planning that tend to downplay the implementation and only describe the fully implemented planning process. The power of this book originates from a project in which a team of five professionals over a period of three years implemented Hoshin Kanri in 14 companies; results were drawn from 130 workshops with leadership teams. The project team subsequently ran several accelerators inside large and small companies as well as public institutions. All these experiences together form the implementation focus of the book.

    Moreover, the organization of the book mirrors the message of its scientific thinking, which is also the basic principle of Hoshin Kanri:

    • Chapter 1 focuses on the basic analysis—Is Hoshin Kanri something for your organization?
    • Chapter 2 addresses the ambition—What is the vision for strategy work in your organization?
    • Chapter 3 presents the conditions needed for effective strategic work.
    • Chapter 4 discusses the choice of implementation strategy and your role as the change agent.
    • Chapter 5 describes how Hoshin Kanri works when implemented.
    • Chapter 6 addresses coaching/mentoring and the Kata philosophy.
    • Chapter 7 presents important analytical tools.
    • Appendix 1 describes the journey made by a medium-sized construction company.

    Essentially, this book describes in a concrete and structured way how you—the change agent—can use Hoshin Kanri in your organization to tackle large and complex challenges.

  • 48.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Andersson, David
    Borand AB, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Management innovation in SMEs – taking psychological ownership of Hoshin Kanri2023In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management innovations are an important source of competitive advantage, but we lack knowledge on the implementation process, not least in small- and medium-sized companies (SMEs). Recognising that psychological ownership (PO) represents a crucial aspect of the implementation process, we address micro-foundational characteristics of the implementation process. PO and critical incident theory (CIT) provide a lens enabling this micro analysis. The empirical setting is the implementation of Hoshin Kanri, a strategic management system in eight small companies. From the analysis of the eight cases, we operationalise four dimensions that characterise how PO evolves in the implementation process: types of PO incidents, frequency of PO incidents, incidents indicating an increase or decrease in PO, and incidents addressing individual or collective PO. Looking at how PO is developed both among CEOs and managers in SMEs, we use the four dimensions to characterise the evolvement of PO within the focal organisations. In doing so, our article elaborates on PO as a driver and, if insufficiently developed, an impediment to effectively implementing management innovations.

  • 49.
    Melander, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Müllern, Tomas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Anderssson, David
    Borand AB, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Träcentrum Nässjö, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Collaborative Research—in Dialogues We Trust2022In: Systemic Practice and Action Research, ISSN 1094-429X, E-ISSN 1573-9295, Vol. 35, p. 655-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By building upon the prior work exploring the nature of practicing and knowing in collaborative research (CR), this article argues that focusing on how trust evolves in collaborative dialogue could enhance the learning potential in CR projects. Drawing from 42 workshops within a CR project, we analyze how dialogue and learning practices develop trust. We use the dialogical framework developed by Walton and Krabbe (1995) to identify and classify 107 dialogues. From our data, we identify three distinct dialogical patterns (educating, inquiring and practicing). These three dialogical patterns are related to four learning practices that are conceptualized as knowledge sharing, knowledge gapping, knowledge bettering and knowledge speculating. Combined, these dialogical patterns and learning practices develop collaborative trust in CR projects. We propose that these results represent an emerging conceptual language that addresses the development of trust in managing CR projects. This conceptual language can both improve managerial practice in the CR context and inspire future theory building.

  • 50.
    Persson, Kasper
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Product design and development (PDD).
    User-centered design of an attachable battery pack for arborists2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globe Group, a company under the brand Greenworks Tools, is one of the industry leaders in battery-powered outdoor equipment, developing tools that deliver the performance of a gasoline-powered tool without the hassle and emissions associated with it. Gasoline-powered tools are still prevalent in the field of arboriculture where arborists work daily with chainsaws while performing tree felling and pruning.

    Now a new type of chainsaw is in development by Globe Group which is characterized by its lightweight and large battery capacity, which brings extraordinary battery life. This feature is possible by redesigning the chainsaw to support an external battery, which is housed in a separate battery pack instead of placing the battery directly inside the tool. The aim of the project is to adapt and design the battery pack for arborists by using a user-centered design approach with focus on ergonomics. This is done by having a close cooperation with the arborists during the whole project, from pre-study to final concept evaluation, to explore and fulfill the needs of the user. By using a wide range of research and design methods, a final concept is developed to reach the needs of the user and company.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
12 1 - 50 of 88
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf