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  • 1.
    Acheampong, Faustina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Information Technology and Information Systems (CenITIS). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Innovating healthcare through remote monitoring: Effects and business model2017In: Health Care Delivery and Clinical Science: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, IGI Global, 2017, p. 247-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology has been suggested to improve patient health outcomes and reduce healthcare cost. This study explored the business model and effects of collaborative innovation between caregivers and patients on healthcare delivery through remote patient monitoring by interviewing caregivers and surveying atrial fibrillation patients. Findings indicate that remote monitoring enhanced early detection of potential risks and quality of clinical decision-making with patients feeling more empowered and involved in their own care. The remote monitoring system which consisted of a home-based ECG and a web-based service and was offered free to patients, brought together caregivers, patients, service provider and the government as actors. The introduction of remote monitoring increased the workload of caregivers and facilitation of timely diagnostics and decision-making were not realized. IT is an enabler of innovation in healthcare, but it must be integrated into work processes with a viable business model to realize potential benefits and sustain it. 

  • 2.
    Adams, Mary
    et al.
    King’s College London, UK.
    Maben, Jill
    King’s College London, UK.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). King’s College London, UK.
    ‘It’s sometimes hard to tell what patients are playing at’: How healthcare professionals make sense of why patients and families complain about care2017In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from sociological and socio-legal studies of dispute between patients and doctors to examine how healthcare professionals made sense of patients’ complaints about healthcare. We analyse 41 discursive interviews with professional healthcare staff working in eight different English National Health Service settings to explore how they made sense of events of complaint and of patients’ (including families’) motives for complaining. We find that for our interviewees, events of patients’ complaining about care were perceived as a breach in fundamental relationships involving patients’ trust or patients’ recognition of their work efforts. We find that interviewees rationalised patients’ motives for complaining in ways that marginalised the content of their concerns. Complaints were most often discussed as coming from patients who were inexpert, distressed or advantage-seeking; accordingly, care professionals hearing their concerns about care positioned themselves as informed decision-makers, empathic listeners or service gate-keepers. We find differences in our interviewees’ rationalisation of patients’ complaining about care to be related to local service contingences rather than to fixed professional differences. We note that it was rare for interviewees to describe complaints raised by patients as grounds for improving the quality of care. Our findings indicate that recent health policy directives promoting a view of complaints as learning opportunities from critical patient/consumers must account for sociological factors that inform both how the agency of patients is envisaged and how professionalism exercised contemporary healthcare work.

  • 3.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. University of Gothenburg, Faculty of Education, Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, Sweden.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Region Jönköping County, Futurum, Sweden.
    Thor, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Quality indicators and their regular use in clinical practice – results from a survey among users of two cardiovascular National Registries in Sweden2018In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the regular use of quality indicators from Swedish cardiovascular National Quality Registries (NQRs) by clinical staff; particularly differences in use between the two NQRs and between nurses and physicians.

    Design: Cross-sectional online survey study.

    Setting: Two Swedish cardiovascular NQRs: a) Swedish Heart Failure Registry and b) Swedeheart.

    Participants: Clinicians (n=185; 70% nurses, 26% physicians) via the NQRs’ email networks.

    Main outcome measures: Frequency of NQR use for a) producing healthcare activity statistics; b) comparing results between similar departments; c) sharing results with colleagues; d) identifying areas for quality improvement (QI); e) surveilling the impact of QI efforts; f) monitoring effects of implementation of new treatment methods; g) doing research; h) educating and informing healthcare professionals and patients.

    Results: Median use of NQRs was ten times a year (25th and 75th percentiles range: 3 – 23 times/year). Quality indicators from the NQRs were used mainly for producing healthcare activity statistics. Median use of Swedeheart was six times greater than SwedeHF (p<0.000). Physicians used the NQRs more than twice as often as nurses (18 vs. 7.5 times/year; p<0.000) and perceived NQR work more often as meaningful. Around twice as many Swedeheart users had the role to participate in data analysis and in QI efforts compared to SwedeHF users.

    Conclusions: Most respondents used quality indicators from the two cardiovascular NQRs infrequently (< 3 times/year). The results indicate that linking registration of quality indicators to using them for QI activities increases their routine use and makes them meaningful tools for professionals.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-05-01 00:00
  • 4.
    Almers, Ellen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences2018In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 242-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing forest gardens as urban settings for outdoor environmental education in Sweden is a new practice. These forest gardens combine qualities of a forest, e.g., multi-layered polyculture vegetation, with those of a school garden, such as accessibility and food production. The study explores both the perceived qualities of forest gardens in comparison to other outdoor settings and forest garden educators’ ideas, purposes, and experiences of activities in a three-year forest gardening project with primary school children. The data were collected through interviews and observations and analyzed qualitatively. Four reported ideas were to give children opportunities to: feel a sense of belonging to a whole; experience self-regulation and systemic dependence; experience that they can co-create with non-human organisms; and imagine possible transformation of places. Four pedagogical forest garden features are discussed.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Thor, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Lenrick, Raymond
    Rapport om utvärdering av IVO:s lärande tillsyn2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inspektionen för vård och omsorg (IVO) har i sin tillsynspolicy lagt fokus på att främja lärande för att stödja utvecklingen av god kvalitet och säkerhet i vård och omsorg. Under 2017 har IVO givit Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare vid Jönköping University i uppdrag att utvärdera tillämpning av lärande tillsyn. Syftet med denna studie var att belysa om, och om möjligt hur, IVO:s tillsyn kan stödja verksamhetsutveckling och förbättring i de tillsynade verksamheter. Det finns många teoribildningar kring lärande och kvalitetsutveckling. Denna rapport tar utgångspunkt i teorier om organisatoriskt lärande, samskapande och förbättringskunskap och belyser vad som kan bidra, och i så fall hur, till en ömsesidig tillit som leder till ett fördjupat lärande som grund för förbättring.

    Studien omfattar två tillsyner, där deltagarna bestod av personal från de berörda verksamheterna, samt IVO-inspektörer från de regionala IVO avdelningar. Det empiriska materialet samlades in genom intervjuer och en observation. En dokumentgenomgång av relevanta IVO dokument skapade underlag för utvecklandet av studiens intervjuguider. Intervjuerna bandades, transkriberades och analyserades med en metod inspirerad av tematisk analys, som utmynnade i fem teman: (I) Förberedelse inför tillsyn; (II) Genomförande i verksamheten; (III) Resultat i verksamheten; (IV) Förutsättningar för lärande; och (V) Önskemål för ökat lärande. Samtliga teman innehåller både förhållanden som stödjer (främjar) och som försvårar (hindrar) lärande:

    • Förberedelsearbetet ansågs inte bidra till en ökad tillit som förutsättning för lärande. Det uttrycktes en önskan om mer samskapande i förberedelsearbetet redan innan tillsynstillfället
    • Det framkom önskemål om att lärandet, som ett av målen med tillsynen, skulle lyftas tydligare i dialogen vid tillsynstillfället.
    • Det uppfattades som svårt att peka på reella resultat i verksamheterna som direkt berodde på tillsynen, men det beskrevs ändå som viktigt att tillsynen fanns.
    • Det fanns olika uppfattningar om hur IVO:s roll som tillsynsmyndighet påverkade lärandet. Ett större fokus på gemensam uppföljning skulle vara ett sätt att optimera lärandet både i verksamheterna och hos IVO:s inspektörer.
    • Ett lärande skulle gynnas av en tydlig gemensam problembeskrivning, samt fortlöpande uppföljningar och delad kunskap, exempelvis genom goda exempel och dialogkonferenser.

    Generellt fanns en stor samstämmighet mellan IVO:s inspektörer och de verksamhetsföreträdare som intervjuats, men vissa skillnader framkom också. Rapporten avslutas med några avslutande reflektioner.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Melke, Anna
    Erfarenheter från lärandeseminarier: Barn som anhöriga: Reflektioner från följeforskning2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under 2015 genomfördes nationella lärandeseminarier för att stärka implementeringen av den lag som ger barn rätt till information, råd och stöd när en förälder plötsligt avlider, är svårt sjuk eller skadad (HSL 2g §). Satsningen var ett förbättringsarbete som omfattade sex landsting som med hjälp av en projektledning träffades vid fyra tillfällen från januari till september. Två av träffarna skedde i Stockholm och två var digitala. Under våren 2015 knöts följeforskning till arbetet med frågeställningar om vilka resultat förbättringsarbetet gav och hur deltagarna upplevde arbetssättet. Syftet var att lyfta fram vad satsningen gav samt att lära inför framtida satsningar – är lärandeseminarier ett användbart arbetssätt för nationella implementeringssatsningar?

    Rapporten visar att lärandeseminarier tycks vara en användbar form. Teamen kan redovisa att de uppnått många av de mål som de föresatte sig under projekttiden. Det handlade om kartläggning av kunskapsläge och strukturer, kompetensutveckling samt utveckling av rutiner och material. Teamen uppskattade också att få delta i ett nationellt sammanhang som gav inspiration. Samtidigt framkom det önskemål om fortsatt och ännu mer handfast stöd i fortsatt implementering i klinisk verksamhet.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Melke, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. The Göteborg Region Association of Local Authorities, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Learning through networking in healthcare and welfare: The use of a breakthrough collaborative in the Swedish context2017In: International Journal of Healthcare Management, ISSN 2047-9700, E-ISSN 2047-9719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breakthrough Collaborative (BC) aims at learning through networking, mainly at micro level, and is used as a tool to improve care and welfare organizations. The aim of this study was to explore and illuminate the challenges when applying BC model at meso and macro level. In 2010, the Swedish Health and Medical Services Act stated the responsibility of healthcare professionals to consider children’s needs as relatives. This study uses an interactive collaborative research model. To support healthcare organizations in the implementation of the regulation, county councils/regions in Sweden were invited to take part in a BC during 2015. Six teams from different county councils/regions participated. Team members were interviewed several times during the project time. Data were analyzed with an explorative and descriptive qualitative content analysis. The result illuminates the challenges faced when applying BC at meso and macro level. Most challenges concern preparation, support structures and system connections. There are similarities with the challenges met at micro level when BC is used at meso and macro level. But it seems even more important to consider how the team is constituted at meso and macro level to make use of the learnings and achieve long-term impact in the home organization.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Johansson, Rose-Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Elg, Mattias
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Christensson, Lennart
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Using quality improvement methods to implement guidelines to decrease the proportion of urinary retention in orthopaedic care2017In: International Archives of Nursing and Health Care, ISSN 2469-5823, Vol. 3, no 1, article id IANHC-3-065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In patients treated with indwelling urethral catheter (IUC), complications such as catheter associated urinary tract infections are common, while underuse of IUC may cause harmful urinary retention (UR). A quality improvement (QI) program called ‘Indwelling urethral catheter (IUC) - only when needed’ was developed in Jönköping County Council, Sweden, aiming at creating a new approach: hospital staff should be able to identify and manage patients with risk of UR, prevent UR or treat UR without delay, and only use urinary IUCs on appropriate indications. The aim of this study was to describe the process of application of the quality improvement program. The Model for Improvement was used, and process coaches were appointed in the participating units. Their training was based on clinical issues and facts about UR, IUCs, guidelines, QI methods and measurements. Data were collected through prospective and retrospective patient record reviews, and differences were analyzed by inferential statistics.

    Before the intervention, only two patients out of 296 were cared for following the guidelines perfectly. During the intervention, adherence to guidelines showed a rising trend, and reached a new stable level, with an average of 67% adherence to guidelines. A systematic improvement program supported by coaches and improvement tools can increase the adherence to new guidelines and incorporate them into local practice. This study also shows that adherence to guidelines can improve patient safety, in this case a decreased risk for and incidence of UR in an orthopaedic patient population.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Futurum-Academy for Health and Care Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Melke, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Göteborg Region Association of Local Authorities, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum-Academy for Health and Care Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Identification of children as relatives with a systematic approach; a prerequisite in order to offer advice and support2018In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate conditions at all system levels in a specific health care service to develop practices for identification of children as relatives. An interactive research approach with the intention to create mutual learning between practice and research was used. The participating health care service cared for both clinic in- and outpatients with psychiatric disorders. Health care professionals from different system levels (micro, meso, macro) participated, representing different professions. At the first project meeting, it was obvious that there was no systematic approach to identify children as relatives. At the micro level, activities such as a pilot survey and an open house activity were carried out. At the meso level, it was discussed how to better support collaboration between units. At the management (macro) level, it was decided that all units should appoint at least one child agent, with the aim to increase collaboration throughout the whole health care service. To change focus, in this case from only parents to inclusion of children, is an important challenge faced by health care services when forced to incorporate new policies and regulations. The new regulations contribute to increased complexity in already complex organizations. This study highlights that such challenges are underestimated.

  • 10.
    Andersson Bäck, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Avby, Gunilla
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Identity work of successful primary care managers and competing institutional logics2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson Bäck, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Avby, Gunilla
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Medical manager hybrids for handling institutional complexity and change in primary care2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This article deals with hybrid persons combining medical professionalism and management for handling institutional complexity and change in primary care. Primary care and identity are in transition in many western countries, in Sweden emphasized by the 2007 reform for patient choice and competition. Research has shown that embedded hybrid actors, familiar and socialized in a field and to its logics, tend to be influential for handling complexity and change. Yet hydrids and their enactment in primary care is an underexplored area.

    Aim: The aim is to contribute to our understanding of hybrid persons and how they are combining medical professionalism and management in primary care, while managing complexity and change.

    Material and methods: In a case study of six successful primary healthcare centers, public and private, covering 56 interviews and observations with various professions, two medical managers ‘hybrids’ showed to be particularly interesting. These were analyzed in-depth, including analysis of staff’s and colleagues’ experiences and contrasted by other managers and hybrids. For the analysis we draw on institutional logic perspective (Thornton, Occasion & Lounsbury 2012) in order to capture preconditions as well as enactment of such change agents.

    Results/conclusions: The hydrids contributed to innovation, creativity and learning in their primary care centres. At their workplace, coherence and a good ambience coexisted with feelings of high work pace and lacking role clarity among the multidisciplinary staff. Categorized in line with McGivern and colleagues(2015) term as ‘willing hybrids’, the persons studied revealed high ambitions to challenge existing institutional order giving professionalism new forms, while seeking to innovate practices and division of work among healthcare staff in primary care. By doing so the hybrids integrated professionalism and managerialism and were influential in reframing problems and solutions, which aligned several logics at play. However several obstacles related to professional as well as bureaucratic issues appeared along the way.

  • 12.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Elg, Mattias
    Division of Quality Technology and Management, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Interrupted time series versus statistical process control in quality improvement projects2016In: Journal of Nursing Care Quality, ISSN 1057-3631, E-ISSN 1550-5065, Vol. 31, no 1, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To measure the effect of quality improvement interventions, it is appropriate to use analysis methods that measure data over time. Examples of such methods include statistical process control analysis and interrupted time series with segmented regression analysis. This article compares the use of statistical process control analysis and interrupted time series with segmented regression analysis for evaluating the longitudinal effects of quality improvement interventions, using an example study on an evaluation of a computerized decision support system.

  • 13.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Finns kompetensen2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Fysioterapeutens roll för att förbättra sexuell hälsa hos patienten med långvarig smärta2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Förbättringsarbete i Fysioterapi2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Inkludera sexuell hälsa i fysioterapi2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Kartläggning av utbildning i hivprevention och SRHR inom nio högre utbildningar i Sverige2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Rehabilitation and sexual health in chronic disease2016In: Conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexual health in rheumatoid arthritis - The role of the physiotherapist to enhance sexual health2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, no Suppl. 2, p. 46-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual health is often negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but rarely discussed between patients and health care professionals. Experienced reasons for decreased sexual health vary among patients, but pain, stiffness, reduced mobility, fatigue and negative feelings towards one’s own body are common factors. In addition to negative effects experienced to be due to RA, there are also negative influences on sexual health by other factors, such as insufficient physical activity, low self-esteem, depression and stressful influences in life. Physiotherapy is a common intervention for patients with RA and patients have reported improved sexual health due to physiotherapy. Regular physiotherapy interventions for patients with RA often include coaching towards increasing physical activity levels, hydrotherapy, pain reductive treatment and mobility exercises, both individually and in groups. The physiotherapy interventions leading to improved sexual health (according to patients with RA) has been regular interventions for patients with RA and not specifically aimed at enhancing sexual health. The patients do seldom describe that the physiotherapist has informed them of how physiotherapy might enhance sexual health, but they have themselves experienced how physiotherapy has improved their sexual life. Patients describe that they experience joy, increased self-esteem and a more positive approach to their body, when participating in physiotherapy and that this positive feeling is affecting their life, including their sexual life. They also describe how increased physical capacity reduces fatigue and increases their capacity to engage in valued life activities, including sexual activities. The way that the physiotherapist can further enhance sexual health, is by informing the patient of how sexual health is linked to experienced symptoms of RA and how physiotherapy interventions, for example increasing physical activity, can enhance also sexual health

  • 20.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexuell hälsa & rehabilitering2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sweden: Co-creating change – Time to include sexual and reproductive health and rights in health and welfare education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    The co-constructive processes in physiotherapy2017In: Cogent Medicine, ISSN 2331-205X, Vol. 4, p. 1-8, article id 1290308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To employ a person-centred approach, it is essential to work with the patient in deciding the important issues that the physiotherapy intervention should target, and to develop and adjust the individual treatment accordingly. Those co-constructive processes of physiotherapy consist of several parts, aiming to improve patient involvement and to optimize intervention outcomes. This paper aims to discuss and bring forward the role of the co-constructive processes in physiotherapy, by using perspectives from learning strategies and quality improvement strategies. The conclusion is that co-constructive learning processes are useful theories, which can be used in unison with quality improvement strategies for optimal co-construction between patients and physiotherapists and thus improve results of physiotherapy interventions.

  • 23.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Lunds universitet.
    Bergenzaun, Lill
    Lunds universitet.
    Fahlvik Svensson, Sofia
    Lunds universitet.
    Lundqvist, Sara
    Lunds universitet.
    Peterson, Pernilla
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindberg-Sand, Åsa
    Lunds universitet.
    “Should I stay or should I go?”: Tolvhundra doktoranders syn på avhopp och akademisk karriär2016Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Occupational therapy students’ views on addressing sexual health2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual health is an important issue in daily life, but little is known about occupational therapy (OT) students’ views on these matters.

    Aim: To explore occupational therapy students’ views on addressing sexual health in their future professional role.

    Material and methods: A descriptive qualitative study involving 37 OT students in 5 focus groups was performed and analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: Three categories: ‘Sexual health is part of occupational therapy and but not of the OT educational program’; ‘Need for knowledge to identify and intervene related to sexual health problems’; and finally, ‘Communication about sexual health—unknown, untried, but necessary’, formed the theme, ‘Willing to try, wanting to know more, and recognizing not only the difficulties and challenges but also the importance of sexual health in OT practice’.

    Conclusions: OT-students consider sexual health as part of OT-practice, but experience lack of knowledge of sexual health related to disease/disability, cultural diversity, and age and sexual orientation. Educational programs need to cover these matters, including how to address sexual health in OT-practice, to enhance OT’s future competence related to promotion of sexual health for clients.

    Significance: Knowledge on students’ views are vital to guide education on this important, rather neglected, area. 

  • 25.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gard, Gunvor
    Lund University.
    Sexual health - a professional challenge for physiotherapists2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gerbild, Helle
    Health Sciences Research Centre, University College Lillebaelt, Denmark.
    Sexual health education - experiences, challenges and recommendations for physiotherapists2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Ethics and sexual health: Exploration of the ethical code of conduct for physiotherapists concerning sexual health in clinical practice2018In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physiotherapists have an important role in sexual health, but there are specific ethical considerations regarding sexuality and the practice of physiotherapy which require serious consideration. This article aims to illustrate how the professional ethical code of physiotherapy can serve as a tool for ethical clinical reasoning regarding sexual health in clinical physiotherapy practice. We analyse the ethical codes for physical therapy, in relation to a definition of sexual health and the declaration of sexual rights. The analysis outlines several ethical considerations crucial in dealing with sexual health, while also acknowledging the critical role of cultural context in any ethical analysis. We conclude that physiotherapists need to practise ethical reasoning and that the ethical code of physiotherapy can act as a point of departure for reflection on thought-provoking ethical dilemmas to improve the practice of physiotherapy and support clients’ overall health. 

  • 28.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Larsson, Agneta
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Health care students' attitudes towards working with sexual health in their professional roles - survey of students at nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programmes2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Lennartsson, Monia
    Rehabiliteringscentrum, Värnamo.
    Tilltro till den egna förmågan att ordinera fysisk träning vid kranskärlssjukdom hos sjukgymnaster/ fysioterapeuter inom svensk primärvård2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns ett ökat behov av sjukgymnaster som arbetar med hjärtrehabilitering i framtiden. Det kan enligt riktlinjerna ske på sjukhus eller via primärvård. För att kunna erbjuda rätt vård krävs tillgängliga sjukgymnaster med rätt kompetens och tilltro till sin egen förmåga. Mer utbildning om fysisk träning vid kranskärlssjukdom behövs för att öka tilltron till den egna förmågan i mötet med dessa patienter, för att försäkra att patienter med kranskärlssjukdom får en jämlik vård.

  • 30.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stenz, Cathrine
    Gerbild, Helle
    Syddansk Unversitet, Danmark.
    Fysioterapi og Seksuel Sundhet2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Thidell, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Prosthetic and orthotic students’ attitudes toward addressing sexual health in their future profession2018In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Prosthetists and orthotists have a responsibility to direct treatment toward enabling their clients to perform desired activities and to facilitate participation of their clients in all areas of life. This may include provision of assistive technologies to help clients meet goals related to participation in sexual activities. To help prosthetic and orthotic students develop competencies in dealing with the sexual health of their future clients, it is necessary to generate knowledge of their own perceived competence and capacity.

    Objectives:

    To explore prosthetic and orthotic students’ attitudes and competence toward working with sexual health and to evaluate reliability and validity of the Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health questionnaire.

    Study design:

    Cross-sectional study.

    Methods:

    Students enrolled in all three years of an undergraduate prosthetic and orthotic program were requested to complete the Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health questionnaire (n = 65). Reliability and validity were evaluated using the content validity index and Cronbach’s alpha.

    Results:

    Students felt unprepared to talk about sexual health with future clients and thought that they would be embarrassed if they raised the issue. No differences were identified between students enrolled in each of the three years of the program and few differences were observed between male and female students. The content validity index values were low but improved as the students’ level of education increased. Internal consistency of the questionnaire was acceptable (α = 0.86).

    Conclusion:

    Prosthetic and orthotic students are unprepared to address sexual health issues with their future clients. There is a need to provide students with training related to sexual health issues.

    Clinical relevance

    This study indicates the need for additional education of prosthetic and orthotic students in issues related to sexual health and how to address sexual health issues with clients. Results can be used to develop training programs for students and will serve to improve the sexual health of individuals who receive prosthetic and orthotic services.

  • 32.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gard, Gunvor
    Sexual health – A professional challenge for physiotherapists2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Health care students' attitudes toward addressing sexual health in their future profession: Validity and reliability of a questionnaire2016In: International Journal of Sexual Health, ISSN 1931-7611, E-ISSN 1931-762X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To test the reliability and validity of the Students' Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health Questionnaire (SA-SH), measuring students' attitudes toward addressing sexual health in their future professions.

    Method: A cross-sectional online survey (22 items) were distributed to 186 nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students in Sweden, April 2015. Validity and reliability were tested.

    Results: The construct validity analysis led to three major factors: present feelings of comfortableness, future working environment, and fear of negative influence on future patient relations. The construct validity, internal consistency reliability, and intrarater reliability showed good results.

    Conclusion: The SA-SH is valid and reliable.

  • 34.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Larsson, Agneta
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Health care students' attitudes towards working with sexual health in their professional roles: Survey of students at nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programmes2016In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 289-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore differences and similarities in health care students’ attitudes towards working with and communicating with patients about sexual health issues in their future professions. The aim was also to explore whether the students’ gender, age and future professions were influencing factors and whether there was a change in attitude depending on educational levels, gender, age and future professions. The study also aimed to explore the potential development of those differences and similarities in attitudes between health care students having achieved different levels of education and training in their future professions. A cross-sectional quantitative study was performed with an online survey distributed to nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. The students believed that they needed increased sexual health education and increased communication skills about sexual health. Gender and future profession are factors that significantly affect the attitudes of the students towards working with sexual health. Nursing and occupational therapy students have a more positive attitude towards addressing sexual health in their future professions than do physiotherapy students. Further research is needed in this field to improve competence in sexual health for all student groups, particularly physiotherapy students. Further research is also needed to explore the significance of gender regarding education in sexual health and attitudes towards working with sexual health.

  • 35.
    Avby, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Andersson Bäck, Monica
    University of Gothenburg.
    A reform as a lever for innovation and professionalism?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Consistently with international trends, managerial reforms and incentive systems in Sweden have been introduced to achieve quality improvement and increased efficiency in welfare services. Evidence suggests that targeted financial micro-incentives can stimulate change in certain areas of care, but they do not result in more radical change, such as service transformations or innovation.

    Aim: In this study we explore how organizational performance are changing within the context of a patient choice reform in primary healthcare.

    Material and Methods: This qualitative study is based on 48 semi-structured interviews with various professions (managers, physicians, nurses, physical- and occupational therapists, care administrators, and nurse assistants) at five PHCCs, conducted as part of a study designed to explore financial incentives and motivation in PHC in Sweden. The PHCCs were purposively selected to ensure the inclusion of both public and private facilities. All centers had a longstanding reputation for good leadership and high quality care. 

    Results: The findings show how professional fields and traits were dissolving and changing, triggering the emergence of innovative solutions in practice. Through ongoing negotiations of professional boundaries new practices unfolded and professionalism increasingly was achieved through contextual conditions. The expanding and changing of professional boundaries as shown in the study are implied to stimulate innovative processes. Thus, the main findings suggest that innovative practices developed as a relationship between contextual conditions and professionalism. E.g. nurses and physical therapists remitted patients directly to the hospital, multiprofessional teams for patient groups with joint needs handled patients that previous needed hospital care, and nurse assistants became responsible for summing patients with minor hypertension for blood pressure controls and consultations.

    Conclusions: The reform seemed to act as a lever for innovation and professionalism under certain conditions. How work is organized and managed is a contextual factor that not only affects work circumstances, but also provides conditions for innovation and professionalism. Impartial to governments’ ambitions to improve their responsiveness to the needs of citizens by altering market rules, new provider models may be of little assistance in achieving the desired effect on health sector reform outcomes if suitable contextual conditions are missing.

  • 36.
    Avby, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Andersson Bäck, Monica
    University of Gothenburg.
    Transforming primary healthcare: Exploring a new provider model as a lever for innovation and professionalism2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Avby, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Andersson Bäck, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sparf, Anette
    Siljehult, Mats
    Samarbete bygger en stark primärvård2017In: Dagens Nyheter 2017-08-17, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Batalden, Maren
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA, United States.
    Batalden, Paul B.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, United States.
    Margolis, Peter
    Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
    Seid, Michael
    Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
    Armstrong, Gail
    College of Nursing, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, United States.
    Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa
    Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
    Hartung, Hans
    Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Crosshouse, Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, United Kingdom.
    Coproduction of healthcare service2016In: BMJ Quality and Safety, ISSN 2044-5415, E-ISSN 2044-5423, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 509-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names - patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always 'coproduced'. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services.

  • 39. Blackwell, R. W. N.
    et al.
    Lowton, K.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Grudzen, C.
    Grocott, P.
    Using Experience-based Co-design with older patients, their families and staff to improve palliative care experiences in the Emergency Department: A reflective critique on the process and outcomes2017In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 68, p. 83-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Increasing use of emergency departments among older patients with palliative needs has led to the development of several service-level interventions intended to improve care quality. There is little evidence of patient and family involvement in developmental processes, and little is known about the experiences of − and preferences for – palliative care delivery in this setting. Participatory action research seeking to enable collaborative working between patients and staff should enhance the impact of local quality improvement work but has not been widely implemented in such a complex setting.

    Objectives

    To critique the feasibility of this methodology as a quality improvement intervention in complex healthcare settings, laying a foundation for future work. Setting an Emergency Department in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom.

    Methods

    Experience-based Co-design incorporating: 150 h of nonparticipant observation; semi-structured interviews with 15 staff members about their experiences of palliative care delivery; 5 focus groups with 64 staff members to explore challenges in delivering palliative care; 10 filmed semi-structured interviews with palliative care patients or their family members; a co-design event involving staff, patients and family members.

    Findings

    The study successfully identified quality improvement priorities leading to changes in Emergency Department-palliative care processes. Further outputs were the creation of a patient-family-staff experience training DVD to encourage reflective discussion and the identification and application of generic design principles for improving palliative care in the Emergency Department. There were benefits and challenges associated with using Experience-based Co-design in this setting. Benefits included the flexibility of the approach, the high levels of engagement and responsiveness of patients, families and staff, and the impact of using filmed narrative interviews to enhance the ‘voice’ of seldom heard patients and families. Challenges included high levels of staff turnover during the 19 month project, significant time constraints in the Emergency Department and the ability of older patients and their families to fully participate in the co-design process.

    Conclusion

    Experience-based Co-design is a useful approach for encouraging collaborative working between vulnerable patients, family and staff in complex healthcare environments. The flexibility of the approach allows the specific needs of participants to be accounted for, enabling fuller engagement with those who typically may not be invited to contribute to quality improvement work. Recommendations for future studies in this and similar settings include testing the ‘accelerated' form of the approach and experimenting with alternative ways of increasing involvement of patients/families in the co-design phase. 

  • 40.
    Clarke, David
    et al.
    Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, Bradford, United Kingdom.
    Jones, Fiona
    Faculty of Health Social Care and Education, St George's University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Harris, Ruth
    Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    What outcomes are associated with developing and implementing co-produced interventions in acute healthcare settings?: A rapid evidence synthesis2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 7, article id e014650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Co-production is defined as the voluntary or involuntary involvement of users in the design, management, delivery and/or evaluation of services. Interest in co-production as an intervention for improving healthcare quality is increasing. In the acute healthcare context, co-production is promoted as harnessing the knowledge of patients, carers and staff to make changes about which they care most. However, little is known regarding the impact of co-production on patient, staff or organisational outcomes in these settings.

    Aims

    To identify and appraise reported outcomes of co-production as an intervention to improve quality of services in acute healthcare settings.

    Design

    Rapid evidence synthesis.

    Data sources

    Medline, Cinahl, Web of Science, Embase, HMIC, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, SCIE, Proquest Dissertation and Theses, EThOS, OpenGrey; CoDesign; The Design Journal; Design Issues.

    Study selection

    Studies reporting patient, staff or organisational outcomes associated with using co-production in an acute healthcare setting.

    Findings

    712 titles and abstracts were screened; 24 papers underwent full-text review, and 11 papers were included in the evidence synthesis. One study was a feasibility randomised controlled trial, three were process evaluations and seven used descriptive qualitative approaches. Reported outcomes related to (a) the value of patient and staff involvement in co-production processes; (b) the generation of ideas for changes to processes, practices and clinical environments; and (c) tangible service changes and impacts on patient experiences. Only one study included cost analysis; none reported an economic evaluation. No studies assessed the sustainability of any changes made.

    Conclusions

    Despite increasing interest in and advocacy for co-production, there is a lack of rigorous evaluation in acute healthcare settings. Future studies should evaluate clinical and service outcomes as well as the cost-effectiveness of co-production relative to other forms of quality improvement. Potentially broader impacts on the values and behaviours of participants should also be considered. 

  • 41.
    Dahlborg Lyckhage, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Lau, Malena
    Tengelin, Ellinor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Högskolan Väst, Avdelningen för vårdvetenskap på avancerad nivå.
    Normer som hinder för jämlik och rättighetsbaserad vård2015In: Jämlik vård: normmedvetna perspektiv / [ed] Dahlborg Lyckhage, Elisabeth, Lyckhage, Gunnar & Tengelin, Ellinor,, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 37-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Dahlborg Lyckhage, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Lyckhage, GunnarTengelin, EllinorJönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Högskolan Väst, Avdelningen för vårdvetenskap på avancerad nivå.
    Jämlik vård: normmedvetna perspektiv2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Dalteg, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Associations of emotional distress and perceived health in persons with atrial fibrillation and their partners using the Actor–Partner Interdependence Model2016In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 368-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual behavior affects and is affected by other people. The aim of this study was to examine if emotional distress in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and their spouses was associated with their own and their partner’s perceived health. Participants included 91 dyads of patients and their spouses. Emotional distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and perceived health was measured with the Short Form 36 Health Survey. The Actor–Partner Interdependence Model was used for dyad-level analyses of associations, using structural equation modeling. Higher levels of anxiety and depression were associated with lower levels of perceived health in patients and spouses. Higher levels of depression in patients were associated with lower levels of vitality in spouses and vice versa. As AF patients and their spouses influence each other, health-care interventions should consider the dyad to address dyadic dynamics. This may benefit the health of the individual patient and of the couple.

  • 44.
    Dalteg, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Department of Internal Medicine County Hospital Ryhov Jönköping Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    The Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    The Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    The heart is a representation of life: an exploration of illness beliefs in couples living with atrial fibrillation2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 21-22, p. 3699-3709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore illness beliefs in couples where one spouse has atrial fibrillation.

    Background: Beliefs are the lenses through which we view the world, guiding our behaviour and constructing our lives. Couples evolve an ecology of beliefs from their interaction whereby their actions and choices arise from their beliefs. Atrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia that has implications for both patients and partners. A couple's illness beliefs play an important role in convalescence and illness management, and no previous studies have explored illness beliefs in couples living with atrial fibrillation.

    Design: A qualitative hermeneutic design.

    Methods: Data collection constituted in-depth interviews with nine couples (patient and partner together). Hermeneutic philosophy as described by Gadamer was used to interpret and to understand illness beliefs in couples living with atrial fibrillation.

    Results: The findings revealed both core illness beliefs and secondary illness beliefs. From the core illness belief 'The heart is a representation of life', two secondary illness beliefs were derived: atrial fibrillation is a threat to life and atrial fibrillation can and must be explained. From the core illness belief 'Change is an integral part of life', two secondary illness beliefs were derived: atrial fibrillation is a disruption in our lives and atrial fibrillation will not interfere with our lives. Finally, from the core illness belief 'Adaptation is fundamental in life', two secondary illness beliefs were derived: atrial fibrillation entails adjustment in daily life and atrial fibrillation entails confidence in and adherence to professional care.

    Conclusion: Couples' interaction has developed mutual illness beliefs regarding atrial fibrillation that guide them in their daily lives and influence their decisions. The adoption of a family-centred perspective in cardiovascular care settings is warranted. 

  • 45.
    Dalteg, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, The Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, The Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Vaxjo, Sweden.
    The heart is a representation of life: an exploration of illness beliefs in couples living with atrial fibrillation2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S41-S41, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Beliefs are the lenses through which we view the world, guiding our behaviour and constructing our lives. Couples evolve an ecology of beliefs from their interaction whereby their actions and choices arise from their beliefs. Atrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia that has implications for both patients and partners. A couple’s illness beliefs play an important role in convalescence and illness management, and no previous studies have examined illness beliefs in couples living with AF.

    Purpose: To explore illness beliefs in couples where one spouse has atrial fibrillation.

    Methods: Data collection constituted in-depth interviews with nine couples (patient and partner together). Hermeneutic philosophy as described by Gadamer was used to interpret and to understand illness beliefs in couples living with AF.

    Results: The findings revealed both core illness beliefs and secondary illness beliefs. From the core illness belief “Theheart is a representation of life,” two secondary illness beliefs were derived: atrial fibrillation is a threat to life and atrial fibrillation can and must be explained. From the core illness belief “Change is an integral part of life,” two secondary illness beliefs were derived: atrial fibrillation is a disruption in our lives and atrial fibrillation will not interfere with our lives. Finally, from the core illness belief “Adaptation is fundamental in life,” two secondary illness beliefs were derived: atrial fibrillation entails adjustment in daily life and atrial fibrillation entails confidence in and adherence to professional care.

    Conclusion: Couples’ interaction has developed mutual illness beliefs regarding atrial fibrillation that guide them in their daily lives and influence their decisions. The adoption of a family-centred perspective in cardiovascular care settings is warranted.

  • 46.
    Day, Annika L.
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Währborg, Peter
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum Akademi for Health and Care Region Jönköping County.
    Rydå, Ulla
    Jansson, Marian
    An evaluation of daily relaxation training and psychosomatic symptoms in young children2016In: Health Behavior and Policy Review, ISSN 2326-4403, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 198-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We evaluated the efficacy of daily relaxation training on psychosomatic symptoms during one school year among 8-year-old children. Methods: Cortisol in saliva, abdominal circumference including body mass index (BMI), heart rate, rate pressure product (RPP), and stress in children (SIC) were measured. Teachers in the intervention classes were interviewed. The intervention consisted of a daily relaxation therapy (RT). Results: The intervention group showed reduced heart rate. Individuals of the intervention group showed an improvement regarding headaches and the ability to fall asleep. The qualitative results showed that the RT had a calming effect on both the children and the teachers. Conclusions: RT among children may be of use to cope with stress as interpreted by some improved parameters in the intervention group.

  • 47. Desai, A.
    et al.
    Zoccatelli, G.
    Adams, M.
    Allen, D.
    Brearley, S.
    Rafferty, A. M.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Department of Adult Nursing, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, United Kingdom.
    Donetto, S.
    Taking data seriously: The value of actor-network theory in rethinking patient experience data2017In: Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, ISSN 1355-8196, E-ISSN 1758-1060, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 134-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hospitals are awash with patient experience data, much of it collected with the ostensible purpose of improving the quality of patient care. However, there has been comparatively little consideration of the nature and capacities of data itself. Using insights from actor-network theory, we propose that paying attention to patient experience data as having agency in particular hospital interactions allows us to better trace how and in what circumstances data lead (or fail to lead) to quality improvement.

  • 48. Donetto, S.
    et al.
    Malone, M.
    Sayer, L.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery, King's College London, United Kingdom.
    New models to support the professional education of health visitors: A qualitative study of the role of space and place in creating ‘community of learning hubs’2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 54, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In response to a policy-driven workforce expansion in England new models of preparing health visitors for practice have been implemented. ‘Community of Learning hubs’ (COLHs) are one such model, involving different possible approaches to student support in clinical practice placements (for example, ‘long arm mentoring’ or ‘action learning set’ sessions). Such models present opportunities for studying the possible effects of spatiality on the learning experiences of students and newly qualified health visitors, and on team relationships more broadly.

    Objectives

    To explore a ‘community of learning hub’ model in health visitor education and reflect on the role of space and place in the learning experience and professional identity development of student health visitors.

    Design

    Qualitative research conducted during first year of implementation.

    Settings

    Three ‘community of learning hub’ projects based in two NHS community Trusts in London during the period 2013–2015. Participants Managers and leads (n = 7), practice teachers and mentors (n = 6) and newly qualified and student health visitors (n = 16).

    Methods

    Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews analysed thematically.

    Results

    Participants had differing views as to what constituted a ‘hub’ in their projects. Two themes emerged around the spaces that shape the learning experience of student and newly qualified health visitors. Firstly, a generalised need for a ‘quiet place’ which allows pause for reflection but also for sharing experiences and relieving common anxieties. Secondly, the role of physical arrangements in open-plan spaces to promote access to support from more experienced practitioners.

    Conclusions

    Attention to spatiality can shed light on important aspects of teaching and learning practices, and on the professional identities these practices shape and support. New configurations of time and space as part of educational initiatives can surface new insights into existing practices and learning models. 

  • 49. Donetto, S.
    et al.
    Penfold, C.
    Anderson, J.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Maben, J.
    Nursing work and sensory experiences of hospital design: A before and after qualitative study following a move to all-single room inpatient accommodation2017In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 46, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The embodied experience of nursing practice is rarely studied. Drawing on data from an internationally relevant larger study conducted in 2013–14, here we explore the sensory dimension of the embodied experiences of nursing staff working on two acute NHS hospital wards before and after a move to all-single room inpatient accommodation. We undertook a secondary analysis of 25 interviews with nursing staff (12 before and 13 after the move with half [13/25] using photographs taken by participants) from a mixed-method before-and-after study. This analysis focused on the sensory dimensions of nursing staff's experiences of their working practices and the effect of the built environment upon these. Drawing on Pallasmaa's theoretocal insights, we report how the all-single room ward design prioritises ‘focused vision’ and hinders peripheral perception, whilst the open ward environment is rich in contextual and preconscious information. We suggest all-single room accommodation may offer staff an impoverished experience of caring for patients and of working with each other. 

  • 50.
    Engström, Karl
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Snabbare och säkrare övergång för patienter från primärvård till specialistpsykiatri: En empirisk fallstudie av antagandens betydelse för ett förbättringsarbete kring remisser och samverkan2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In Sandviken, the adult psychiatric care is divided between Primary Health Centers and Psychiatry. The transferral of patients was unsafe and meant prolonged time before psychiatric treatment was started as 50 % of the referrals were declined.

    Purpose

    The improvement project aimed to reduce the proportion of declined referrals and to reduce time between referral and psychiatric treatment.

    The study aimed to find out beliefs existing among stakeholders and the effect of these on the improvement work.

    Methods

    The idea to test, a referral template, was chosen in advance of the project start. Several improvement tools were used and one primary focus was to base decisions upon facts.

    The study was an empirical case study with qualitative analysis made on documents and interviews.

    Results

    The improvement project didn’t achieve the set aims. The study showed that beliefs about what was needed and possible to do, contributed to the results of the improvement work.

    Conclusions

    The improvement project showed the importance of testing new ideas. The referral template wasn’t a working solution. Stakeholders beliefs about what was needed and possible to do, and how to do it, was shown to contribute to the results of the improvement work.

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