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  • 1.
    Abbasi, Sina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Swedish housing market: An investigation of whether there exists a bubble in the market for one- or two dwelling buildings2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    College of Engineering, TEMEP, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The main support mechanisms to finance renewable energy development2014In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 40, 876-885 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that the major part of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern aimed at reducing carbon emissions. In addition, major consumer countries are looking for alternative sources of energy to avoid the impact of higher fossil fuel prices and political instability in the major energy supplying countries. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reduce carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovation and the creation of green jobs. This study compares three main support mechanisms employed by governments to finance renewable energy development programs: feed-in-tariffs, tax incentives, and tradable green certificates. Considering that many of the promising technologies to deploy renewable energy require investment in small-scale energy production systems, these mechanisms could be used to enhance renewable energy development at the desired scale. Employing a carbon emission tax or emission trading mechanism could be considered ideal policies to mitigate emissions at the lowest cost. The comparison of feed-in-tariffs and renewable portfolio standard policies showed that the former is good when a policy to develop renewable energy sources with a low level of risk for investors is considered. However, the latter is an appropriate policy when a market view policy is applied by the government. Finally, considering technological progress and the cost reduction for power generation by renewable energy sources, we suggest that support mechanism policies should be reconsidered from the financial point of view. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Main Support Mechanisms to Finance Renewable Energy Development2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that the major part of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern aimed at reducing carbon emissions. Additionally, major consumer countries are looking for alternative sources of energy to avoid the impact of higher fossil fuel prices and political instability in the major energy supplying countries. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reduce carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovation and creation of green jobs. There are three main support mechanisms employed by governments to finance renewable energy development programs: feed-in-tariffs, tax incentives, and tradable green certificates. Considering that many of the promising technologies to deploy renewable energy require investment in small-scale energy production systems, these mechanisms could be used to enhance renewable energy development at the desired scale. Employing a carbon emission tax or emission trading mechanism could be considered ideal policies to mitigate emissions at the lowest cost. The comparison of feed-in-tariffs and renewable portfolio standard policies showed that the former is good when a policy to develop renewable energy sources with a low level of risk for investors is considered. However, the latter is an appropriate policy when a marketview policy is applied by the government.

  • 4.
    Abolhosseini, Shahrouz
    et al.
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Altmann, Jörn
    TEMEP, Seoul National University.
    A Review of Renewable Energy Supply and Energy Efficiency Technologies2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption will comprise an increasing share of global energy demand during the next two decades. In recent years, the increasing prices of fossil fuels and concerns about the environmental consequences of greenhouse gas emissions have renewed the interest in the development of alternative energy resources. In particular, the Fukushima Daiichi accident was a turning point in the call for alternative energy sources. Renewable energy is now considered a more desirable source of fuel than nuclear power due to the absence of risk and disasters. Considering that the major component of greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, there is a global concern about reducing carbon emissions. In this regard, different policies could be applied to reducing carbon emissions, such as enhancing renewable energy deployment and encouraging technological innovations. Two main solutions may be implemented to reduce CO2 emissions and overcome the problem of climate change: replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources as much as possible and enhancing energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss alternative technologies for enhancing renewable energy deployment and energy use efficiency.

  • 5.
    Adam, Frane
    et al.
    Institute for Developmental and Strategic Analyses (IRSA).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    The meaning and importance of socio-cultural context for innovation performance2013In: Innovation in Socio-Cultural Context, New York: Routledge, 2013, 1-21 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Adam, Liljeroos
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Hjalmarsson, Gabriel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Valuation of Amenities in the Housing Market: A Hedonic Price Approach2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper intends to examine what fraction of house prices can be accredited to the distance between residential properties and proximity to parks, water and city centers. Although a large body of work on the subject of amenities and house prices using a hedonic model already exists, we wish to contribute with an in-depth analysis on these variables of focus. The empirical analysis uses a dataset concerning 8319 single family house purchases in the Swedish municipality of Jönköping, collected during the years 2000 to 2011. The main findings show that house prices are negatively effected as the distance increases to amenities and that by testing for land value as the dependent variable, we highlight the importance of geographical location while ignoring charac-teristics surrounding the house.

  • 7.
    Adinugrahan, Sapto
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Ridwan, Mochamad
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Efficiency of Foreign Debt Portfolio Management in Emerging Economies2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Fluctuation of exchange rate has affected the increasing burden of foreign debt payment in emerging economies. This issue has negatively influenced the economic growth. It has been a severe obstacle considering that governments have to issue public debt denominated in foreign currency to finance the budget deficit. Hence, there is an urgent necessity to implement an efficient public debt management to minimize the exchange rate exposure. This thesis analyses how efficient the foreign debt portfolio management is in the 14 emerging economies under examination in the period of 1990-2013. Panel Dynamic Fixed-effect Estimator and Granger Causality approach are applied to analyze how responsive the currency composition of foreign debt portfolio to the exchange rates movement. The thesis examines the four biggest foreign debt shares that are denominated in US dollar, Euro, British pound, and Japanese yen, and the related exchange rates movement in the economies under consideration. The observation concludes that the foreign debt portfolio management in these emerging economies is not efficient or not optimal. The evidences prove that changes in the exchange rates of Euro, British pound, and Japanese yen relative to US dollar Granger cause changes in respected debt shares. It means that there is no substitution effects from the appreciation of the currencies vis-à-vis the US dollar during the year of observation.

  • 8.
    Akbas, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Are students acting rational?: A study in Behavioural finance.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Finance taught in schools generally starts with the efficient market hypothesis, which holds the assumptions of rational investors and markets where all information available is reflected. In recent years however, a lot of critique has been given to efficient markets and its assumptions of rationality. The greatest reason to this is because of crashes and irregularities in the market.

    The field of behavioural finance has been in existence for many years but is not as established as the efficient market hypothesis. It says that investors may act irrational and are mostly trying to explain the reasons why. People’s behaviour is being closely studied in order to see patterns of behaviour and this has resulted in different heuristics and biases. Heuristics are instances that come to mind when making a decision and differ a lot depending on what kind of decision you are making.

    Since there are many different heuristics, this thesis only focused on one: the affect heuristic. The method was constructed in a specific way in order to show if the students showed affect in their answers. Also, a check for home bias was made.

    This thesis presents the behaviour of two different groups of students, finance students from Sweden and MBE-students from Germany. It was proved that both of the groups were acting irrational in their investment decisions. The reason to their irrationality is both because the method was constructed in a way to strategically mislead them but also because of the data collection. There were also some differences noticed depending on age groups, former studies in finance and work experience in finance. The affect heuristic was clearly shown in the answers by both groups of students.

    A home bias was also noticed in the answers. It was proven that 10,3 percent of the Swedish students invested in Swedish companies in both their first and second choice, even though the three best companies were German. None of the German Students decided to invest in a Swedish company in both the first and second choice.

  • 9.
    Andersson, David Emanuel
    et al.
    National Yat-sen University, Taiwan.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Analysing Creative Cities2011In: Handbook of Creative Cities / [ed] David Emanuel Andersson, Åke E. Andersson, Charlotta Mellander, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, 3-13 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    National Yat-sen University, Taiwan.
    Mellander, CharlottaJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.Andersson, Åke EJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Handbook of Creative Cities2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the publication of The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida in 2002, the ‘creative city’ became the new hot topic among urban policymakers, planners and economists. Florida has developed one of three path-breaking theories about the relationship between creative individuals and urban environments. The economist Åke E. Andersson and the psychologist Dean Simonton are the other members of this ‘creative troika’. In the Handbook of Creative Cities, Florida, Andersson and Simonton appear in the same volume for the first time. The expert contributors in this timely Handbook extend their insights with a varied set of theoretical and empirical tools. The diversity of the contributions reflect the multidisciplinary nature of creative city theorizing, which encompasses urban economics, economic geography, social psychology, urban sociology, and urban planning. The stated policy implications are equally diverse, ranging from libertarian to social democratic visions of our shared creative and urban future.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Emma
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Relationship Between Interest Rates and Bank Risk-taking: An investigation of the Euro area2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    Andersson, Erik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Relationship Between House Prices and the Stock Market2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stocks and houses are the two major assets on the balance sheet of American households. Changes in the two markets have a large influence on wealth and the general economy. This thesis investigates the relationship between the stock market and the house market in the U.S from 1987 to 2013. The sample period is unique since it includes two structural breaks, the dot-com bubble and the most recent financial crisis. A bivariate correlation analysis is applied to investigate the correlation and the Granger causality test, based on a vector autoregressive model (VAR), investigates the causality between the two variables. The causality test is performed with and without GDP and interest rates as control variables. In order to investigate a potential dynamic causality, the full sample period is divided into two periods. The bivariate correlation analysis concludes that a large and positive correlation exists between the two markets. All causality tests indicate a unidirectional causality running from the stock market to the house market. An impulse response function (IRF) is estimated in order to investigate the size and timing of the causality. The IRF concludes that a one percentage change in the stock market affects the house market by 0.032581 percent three years later, corresponding to a change in the value of real estates possessed by American households of 7.04 billion of dollars. The same number amounts to 47.00 billion of dollars five years later. It is concluded that the relationship has a significant influence on the wealth of American households hence a need for developing a hedging instrument which reduces the ramifications from changes in the stock market is large. 

  • 13.
    Andersson, Lina
    et al.
    Department of Economics and Statistics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    Department of Economics and Statistics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hussain, Shakir
    School of Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Shukur, Ghazi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Ethnic origin, local labour markets and self-employment in Sweden: A Multilevel Approach2013In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 50, no 3, 885-910 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the importance of ethnic origin and local labour markets conditions for self-employment propensities in Sweden. In line with previous research, we find differences in the self-employment rate between different immigrant groups as well as between different immigrant cohorts. We use a multilevel regression approach in order to quantify the role of ethnic background, point of time for immigration and local market conditions in order to further understand differences in self-employment rates between different ethnic groups. We arrive at the following: The self-employment decision is to a major extent guided by factors unobservable in register data. Such factors might be, that is, individual entrepreneurial ability and access to financial capital. The individual’s ethnic background and point of time for immigration play a smaller role for the self-employment decision but are more important than local labour market conditions.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Ctr Excellence Sci & Innovat Studies CESIS, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Baltzopoulos, Apostolos
    Nordregio, Nord Ctr Spatial Dev, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lööf, Hans
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Ctr Excellence Sci & Innovat Studies CESIS, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden .
    R&D strategies and entrepreneurial spawning2012In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 41, no 1, 54-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes how different R&D strategies of incumbent firms affect the quantity and quality of their entrepreneurial spawning. When examining entrepreneurial ventures of ex-employees of firms with different R&D strategies, three things emerge: First, firms with persistent R&D investments and a general superiority in sales, exports, productivity, profitability and wages are less likely to generate entrepreneurs than firms with temporary or no R&D investments. Second, start-ups from knowledge intensive business service (RIBS) firms with persistent R&D investments have a significantly increased probability of survival. No corresponding association between the R&D strategies of incumbents and survival of entrepreneurial spawns is found for incumbents in manufacturing sectors. Third, spin-outs from KIBS-firms are more likely to survive if they start in the same sector, indicating the importance of inherited knowledge. These findings suggest that R&D intensive firms are less likely to generate employee start-ups, but their entrepreneurial spawns tend to be of higher quality. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Heterogeneous Distributions of Firms Sustained by Innovation Dynamics — A Model with Empirical Illustrations and Analysis2012In: Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, ISSN 1566-1679, E-ISSN 1573-7012, Vol. 12, no 2, 239-263 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a framework of innovation dynamics to appreciate observed heterogeneity of firm size distributions, in which dynamics refer to exit and entry of product varieties and variety markets of individual firms. The analysis is based on a model of variety-triplets where every such triplet in the economy is identified by a unique combination of a variety, destination and firm. New variety triplets are introduced by innovating firms in a quasi-temporal setting of monopolistic competition. Ideas for variety-triplets arrive to firms according to a firm-specific and state dependent Poisson process, whereas variety triplets exit according to a destination-specific Poisson process. The empirical analysis employs a detailed firm-level data base which provides information about all variety triplets. Firm size is measured by a firm’s number of variety triplets. The empirical results are compatible with the model predictions of (i) a persistent distribution of firm sizes, (ii) frequent events of exit and entry, and (iii) state dependent entry, where a state may be given by each firm’s composition of triplets and/or other firm attributes.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regional policy as change management: theoretical discussion and empirical illustration2012In: Innovation governance in an open economy: shaping regional nodes in a globalized world / [ed] Annika Rickne, Staffan Laestadius and Henry Etzkowitz, New York: Routledge, 2012, 136-161 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Lund.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Lööf, Hans
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Introduction: Innovation and  Growth - From R&D Strategies of Innovating Firms to Economy-Wide Technological Change2012In: Innovation & Growth: From R&D Strategies of Innovating Firms to Economy-Wide Technological Change / [ed] Martin Andersson, Börje Johansson, Charlie Karlsson and Hans Lööf, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 1-17 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Market-Size and Employment: Separating Scale and Diversity Effects2013In: Metropolitan Regions / [ed] Johan Klaesson, Börje Johansson, Charlie Karlsson, Springer, 2013, 261-273 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regional Interaction and Economic Diversity: exploring the role of geographically overlapping markets for a municipality's diversity in retail and durables2008In: Innovation, Agglomeration and Regional Competition / [ed] Johansson, B., Karlsson, C. & Stough, R.R., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Socio-cultural contexts of small innovative and enterprising regions: An empirical analysis using the Gnosjö region in Sweden as a benchmark2014In: The social dynamics of innovation networks / [ed] Roel Rutten, Paul Benneworth, Dessy Irawati, Frans Boekema, Routledge, 2014, 81-100 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The sources of the urban wage premium by worker skills: Spatial sorting or agglomeration economies?2014In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 93, no 4, 727-747 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the respective importance of spatial sorting and agglomeration economies in explaining the urban wage premium for workers with different sets of skills. Sorting is the main source of the wage premium. Agglomeration economies are in general small, but are larger for workers with skills associated with non-routine job tasks. They also appear to involve human capital accumulation, as evidenced by the change in the wage of workers moving away from denser regions. For workers with routine jobs, agglomeration economies are virtually non-existent. Our results provide further evidence of spatial density bringing about productivity advantages primarily in contexts when problem-solving and interaction with others are important.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
    Lööf, Hans
    Royal Inst Technol, CESIS, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Small business innovation: firm level evidence from Sweden2012In: Journal of Technology Transfer, ISSN 0892-9912, E-ISSN 1573-7047, Vol. 37, no 5, 732-754 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines innovation among very small firms and provides new insights into both internal and external determinants of patenting. Applying a non-linear panel data approach to about 160,000 observations on manufacturing firms in Sweden for the period 2000-2006, the following facts emerge: (i) in contrast to larger firms, innovation in micro firms with 1-10 employees is not sensitive to variation in internal financial resources, (ii) skilled labour is even more important for innovation among micro firms compared to other firms, (iii) affiliation to a domestically owned multinational enterprise group increases the innovation capacity of small businesses, (iv) small firms' innovation is closely linked to participation in international trade and exports to the G7-countries, and (v) there is no statistically significant evidence that proximity to metropolitan areas, or presence in a specialized cluster, increases the innovativeness of the smallest firm.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, CIRCLE, Lund, Sweden.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    External Trade and Internal Geography: Local Export Spillovers by Industry Characteristics and Firm Size2012In: Spatial Economic Analysis, ISSN 1742-1772, Vol. 7, no 4, 420-445 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exporting firms in a region may reduce export entry costs for other local firms either through market or non-market interactions. This paper tests this proposition by analyzing whether the probability of exporting among Swedish firms is positively associated with the local presence of exporters in their region and industry. Our results support this conjecture, while also providing some support for such export spillovers being more important in contract-intensive industries and small firms. The results for different industries and size-classes of firms are also sensitive to whether we focus on firms' export status or restrict the sample to export starters.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Economics of creativity2009In: New directions in regional economic development / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Åke E. Andersson, Paul C. Cheshire, Roger R. Stough, Berlin: Springer, 2009, 79-95 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of us have got an education adapted to the demands for specialized labor emanating in industry or public administration. Most of the jobs have been decided according to the basic principle of division of labour, generating productivity of the work. According to this principle the worker should be specialized to perform certain highly specialized tasks without any greater space for improvisation or change of work routines. Adam Smith (1776, 1904) argued strongly in favour of a far-going division of labor (or specialization of the workforce) as a way of achieving growth of productivity. However, Adam Smith clearly saw the potential conflict between creativity and productivity by division of labor and specialization of the work force: In the progress of the division of labor, the employment of the far greater part of those who live by labor, that is, of the great body of the people, comes to be confined to a few very simple operations; frequently to one or two. But the understandings of the greater part of man are necessarily formed by their ordinary employments. The man whose whole life is spent in performing a few simple operations, of which the effects to are, perhaps, always the same, or very nearly the same, has no occasion to exert his understanding, or to exercise his invention in finding out expedience for removing difficulties which never occur. He naturally loses, therefore, the habit of such exertion and generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become. (Wealth of Nations, II)

  • 25.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Knowledge Accessibility, Economic Growth and the Haavelmo Paradox2013In: Metropolitan Regions: Knowledge Infrastructures of the Global Economy / [ed] Klaesson, Johan, Johansson, Börje, Karlsson, Charlie, New York: Springer, 2013, 73-90 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic growth has conventionally been modelled for space-less economies. Econometrically, growth models have mostly been estimated on time series of national economies with minimal distinctions between economies as large as Japan or the USA and as small as the smallest economies of Asia and Europe. This approach to the analysis of economic growth is especially dangerous when the impact of scientific and technological knowledge is important for the process of growth. Creative activities and the formation of knowledge are highly clustered in space. Thus, the spatial distribution of accessibility to knowledge capital and investments determines economic growth of nations and other spatial aggregates.

    The Haavelmo paradox contrasts chaos as the generic property of non-linear dynamic models with the fact that most statistics on macroeconomic growth processes tend towards persistent constant positive rates of growth. The paradox can be resolved if the non-linear dynamic model is subdivided into fast, private variables and very slow, public variables. Modelling spatial accessibility of knowledge as a slow, public variable and machinery and similar material capital as a relatively faster, private variable ensures stable growth, at least in the short and medium terms of the economic growth processes.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Productivity of and Returns to Knowledge Investments ÅE Andersson Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of InnovatioManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Returns to Education Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of InnovationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Time and Capital in Dynamic and Spatial Economic TheoryAuthors Åke E AnderssonPublication date2012/5/7Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Time, Space, and Capital2012In: The Spatial Market Process / [ed] Andersson David Emanuel, London: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, 57-77 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öresundsregionen: Den dynamiska Metropolen2013Book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Andersson, David Emanuel
    Nottingham University Business School China.
    Daghbashyan, Zara
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hårsman, Björn
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Location and spatial clustering of artists2014In: Regional Science and Urban Economics, ISSN 0166-0462, Vol. 47, 128-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surveys of artists' location choices show that they disproportionately reside in large cities. This paper introduces a model that attempts to explain this urban preference. The model includes four factors: access to other artists; access to consumer demand; access to service jobs; and housing affordability. These four factors are combined in a spatial equilibrium model. An equilibrium spatial distribution of artists is derived from the model and is correlated with the actual distribution among Swedish municipalities. Subsequently, the model is used for an econometric estimation of factor effects. The results show that access to other artists and local access to service jobs are important localization factors. Educated labor used as a proxy for consumer demand has a significant effect on artists' location choices.

  • 32.
    Andersson, Åke E.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Beckmann, Martin J.
    Brown University, USA.
    Economics of knowledge: Theory, models and measurements2009Book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Anxo, Dominique
    et al.
    Department of Economics and Statistics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Hussain, Shakir
    Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK .
    Shukur, Ghazi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The demand of part-time in European companies: a multilevel modelling approach2012In: Applied Economics, ISSN 0003-6846, E-ISSN 1466-4283, Vol. 44, no 8, 1057-1066 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Part-time work is one of the most well-known « atypical » working time arrangements. In contrast to previous studies focusing on the supply side, the originality of our research is to investigate the demand-side of part-time work and to examine how and why companies use part-time work. Based on a large and unique sample of European firms operating in 21 member states, we use a multilevel multinomial modeling in a Bayesian environment. Our results suggest that the variations in the extent of part-time workers at the establishment level is determined more by country-specific features than by industry specific factors.

  • 34.
    Ax, Åsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Jebrail, Jessica
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Swedish SMEs Established in China: - How to finance business and financial obstacles encountered2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Small- and medium size enterprises are well known for being the backbone of the economy. They are the key factors of the economic growth as well as for innovating and developing products and services. Financial obstacles often occur for Swedish SMEs when they are searching for ways of financing the business. The lack of necessary financing to help SMEs’ businesses grow has been brought up in many institutions supportive of Swedish SMEs.

    This study is conducted to examine and give an understanding of how Swedish SMEs established in China are financing their businesses since strong internal financing results in a decrease for a need for external financing. Furthermore, the study is looking at what type of financial obstacles SMEs may encounter.

    For this purpose the relevant arguments are presented and discussed. This is done through a qualitative approach as well as hermeneutic phenomenology for a more in depth analysis on how certain Swedish SMEs are financing their business in China. The writers have chosen to interview Swedish SMEs who in some way are in the business of manufacturing and production and who are established in China.  Interviews were also conducted with representatives from financial institutions in order to gather information on how Swedish SMEs can access external financing. All of the interviews were performed in a semi-structured manner. When the information was gathered some of the Swedish SMEs requested the answers to be anonymous, therefore the writers is keeping all answers from the responding SMEs anonymous in the result and analysis part of the thesis. The answers from the financial representatives are however clearly stated which respondent answered what. Additionally, the writers found that most of the existing research on financing can explain the SMEs financial decisions, yet there was some adaption needed in regards to the theories in order for them to fit into the context of the Swedish SMEs and financiers.

    Moreover, the authors found that there is no large financing gap or demand to require additional credit from traditional banks or other financiers. Hence, the participating Swedish SMEs established in China mainly obtain financing from shareholder equity or other internal sources to finance their business.

  • 35.
    Babil, David
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Cash Management: Improving The Liquidity for Jonsons Byggnads AB With Cash Management2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background: Cash management means the management of liquidity in order to meet their day-to-day commitment. The result of poor focus on cash management often means that the financial assets are bound. The management of liquidity is not something new but cash management is a modern way of doing that. Cash management is a very broad subject which involves many factors, this paper will focus on examine how the liquidity is managed in Jonsons Byggnads AB, in order to improve the liquidity through cash management thinking. Jonsons Byggnads AB is a local construction firm located in Jönköping. This paper will examine the firm’s liquidity with focus on payment/payout routines, liquidity management, short-term financing and the connection between accounts receivables and payables.

     

    Purpose: The purpose is to examine Jonsons bygg’s liquidity today in order to later recognize which factors within cash management that can strengthen the liquidity position for Jonsons Byggnads AB.

    Method: This is a qualitative study based examining the liquidity management for Jonsons Byggnads AB. The collection of the data and information was gathered by interviews, observations and balance sheet/income statement (Jonsons Byggnads AB). The interviews were done with Fadi Babil (The owner of Jonsons Byggnads AB) and two other staff members, which have chosen to be anonymous. Fadil Sadiku (Financial advisor at Swedbank) have also been interviewed in order to gather information about various products Swedbank offers to improve the liquidity for Jonsons Byggnads AB.

    Conclusion: The result of this study showed us that Jonsons Byggnads AB have good liquidity position even though the company does not have anyone employed to manage the liquidity. Even though Jonsons bygg’s liquidity position is healthy, there are some areas that can be improved. Improvements in the payment/payout routines can be done by computerizing the sales ledger system completely and therefore be more efficient and profitable. Connecting the invoices to an account with higher interest is also an approach to be more profitable. Since the accounts being used today have almost no interest. 

  • 36.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Human capital in firms and regions: Impact on firm productivity2014In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 93, no 3, 557-575 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the importance of human capital for firm productivity and makes a clear distinction between the role of human capital inside and outside of the firm. A multilevel model is used for the business service sector in Sweden controlling for heterogeneity across the industry and municipal level. Human capital in firms in terms of education, experience, and cognitive skills and the firm's overall access to human capital has a positive impact on firm productivity. In addition, firm attributes explain the largest proportion of firm productivity variance.

  • 37.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regional variation of returns to education2013Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regional Variation of Returns to EducationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regions, Human Capital and New Firm Formation2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis shows the importance of human capital at the individual, firm, and regional level through its effects on returns to education, firm productivity and new firm formation. The thesis further shows the importance of banks as a determinant for new firm formation at the local level. The thesis comprises of five chapters, one introductory chapter followed by four independent chapters, empirical in their nature.

    The second chapter in the thesis, Regional Variations of Returns to Education, analyses individuals’ return to education in different regional contexts. The results show that returns to education differ according to type of location. Conclusively, the often-assumed hypothesis of equal returns to education for all regions in a country can be rejected. The second chapter, Human Capital and Firm Performance, uses a firm perspective and tests how human capital, within and outside the firm, influences firm productivity. Results show that both types of human capital are positively associated with firm productivity. Overall, it is firm attributes that explain most of the productivity variance. The third chapter, Accessibility to Human Capital and New Firm Formation, compares how human capital influences new firm formation in different regional categories. Overall, it is the access to human capital at the local and intra-regional level that increases the new firm formation rate. However, the influence from human capital differs across the regional categories and their position in the hierarchical system. The last chapter, Banks and New Firm Formation, analyses how different characteristics of the local bank sector influence new firm formation. The average size of bank branches per capita, independent banks, bank branches per capita and the competitive level are positively associated with local startups.

  • 40.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Returns to Education across the urban-rural hierarchy2014In: The Review of Regional Studies, ISSN 0048-749X, Vol. 44, no 1, 33-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Returns to education are mainly influenced by the characteristics of the individual. However, returns also depend on location characteristics; suggesting location premia can exist for educational attainment. This paper analyzes regional variations to returns from education using Swedish municipalities. The political geography of Sweden assists the analysis since it can be divided into four categories based on size and commuting patterns. Based on the obtained results, the often-assumed hypothesis of equal returns to education for all regions in a country can be rejected. The highest returns to education are found in municipalities at the top of the urban-rural hierarchy (dense and large municipalities), and the lowest are in the most peripheral municipalities.

  • 41.
    Backman, Mikaela
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Who says life is over after 55? Entrepreneurship and an aging population2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regional variations in returns to education2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Returns to Education: A Regional Perspective2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Determinants of entrepreneurship. Is it all about the individual or the region?2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well established at whatever spatial level studied that economic actors exhibit a strong tendency to cluster. Despite this fact many explanations to entrepreneurship only considers the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs. This is certainly not a satisfactory state-of-the-art. It is obvious that the influence of spatial factors must be considered carefully. In this paper we illustrate empirically that variations in the rate of entrepreneurship are explained not only in terms of characteristics of entrepreneurs, such as education, sector of employment, occupation, experience and income but also by the characteristics of i) the localities where they worked before they became entrepreneurs, ii) the localities where they currently started their firm and iii) the regions where these localities are situated. The characteristics of localities include size, population density, firm density and type of locality (metropolitan, urban, semi-rural or rural). The estimations use a multi-level approach to decipher the how much of the variance that can be explained by the different levels (individual, locality and region). The data used in this study is micro-level data for Sweden provided by Statistics Sweden.

  • 45.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Determinants of entrepreneurship: Is it all about the individual or the region?2013In: International Review of Entrepreneurship, Vol. 11, no 3, 1-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Who says life is over after 55? Entrepreneurship and an aging population2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies confirm a positive inverted U-shaped relationship between age and entrepreneurship. This paper analyses if this statement is true also for Sweden. By focusing on those above the age of 50, this paper adds knowledge about how individuals close to their retirement act in terms of self-employment and to what extent they contributeas entrepreneurs to the overall society. First, it analyses at the regional level the propensity of older people to start firms with a focus on the relationship between different age cohorts and the rate of new firm formation. At the second stage, an individual perspective is taken where the probability to become self-employed is expected to increase as individuals become older but at a decreasing rate. By decomposing the population in different age cohorts, it is possible to find differences in the probability of becoming self-employed. To increase and deepen the knowledge about the relationship between age and entrepreneurship this paper further adds to existing literature by separating regions into different categories along the urban-rural hierarchy. The results in this paper confirm that the rate of entrepreneurship first increases and then decreases with age. Individuals above both 55 and 64 have a positive influence on the rate of entrepreneurship at both the regional as well as the individual level. The impact is stronger in locations that are more rural.

  • 47.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Kohlhase, Janet
    University of Houston, Department of Economics, Houston, TX.
    The Influence of Diversity on the Formation, Survival and Growth of New Firms2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our paper investigates how diversity of the labor force influences the rate of new firm formation and the performance of new firms in urban areas. A diversified labor force within the firm and in the external environment influences the formation, survival and growth of firms. We explore these issues with both aggregate data at the municipal level and individual data at the firm level for the years 1993-2010. We measure diversity using entropy measures that account for a wider range of differences than is typically used. Our empirical analysis finds a positive influence of diversity of the labor force on the rate of new firm formation at the municipal level. At the level of an individual firm, we find that the diversity of the firm’s labor force is positively associated with the survival and growth of new firms. Our results add to the literature on the workings of agglomeration economies through variations in human capital, information spillovers and innovation.

  • 48.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Regional Level of Human Capital - What are the Determinants?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Bai, Lu
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Effects of global financial crisis on Chinese export: a gravity model study2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 50.
    Barasinska, Nataliya
    et al.
    Deutsche Bundesbank.
    Schäfer, Dorothea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. DIW Berlin .
    Is Crowdfunding Different? Evidence on the Relation between Gender and Funding Success from a German Peer-to-Peer Lending Platform2014In: The German Economic Review, ISSN 1465-6485, E-ISSN 1468-0475, Vol. 15, no 4, 436-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the literature on traditional banking, lenders often discriminate against female borrowers. However, studies of Peer-to-Peer lending in the United States find that female borrowers have better chances of obtaining funds than do males. We provide evidence on the success of female borrowers at a large German peer-to-peer lending platform. Our results show that there is no effect of gender on the individual borrower's chance to receive funds on this platform, ceteris paribus. Several robustness checks confirm this finding. Hence, female discrimination seems to be eased by the wisdom of the lending crowd'.

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