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  • 1. Adair, B
    et al.
    Ullenhag, A.
    Rosenbaum, P.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Keen, D.
    Imms, C.
    A systematic review of measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and of their alignment with the family of Participation-Related ConstructsIn: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Alrawi, Sura
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Younan, Manar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    High Molecular Weight (HMW) snabbtypning av Clostridium difficile med MALDI-TOF MS: Genom två metoder direkt och proteinextraktion2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Andersson, Sara
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lidman, Emma
    Underdiagnostisering av tarmparasiter hos patienter med diarrébesvär2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Underdiagnosis of intestinal parasites in patients with diarrhea

    A compilation from the Swedish public health authority indicates that infections caused by Cryptosporidium spp. increased in Sweden from 47 cases in 2004 to 594 cases in 2016 and Giardia intestinalis causes around 1300 infections per year. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of parasites in patients with diarrhea. Furthermore, the study investigated whether samples taken with E-swab could be analyzed with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of Cryptosporidium spp., Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and G. intestinalis rather than Sodium acetate-acetic acid-formaline fixative (SAF-fixative). Prevalence of parasites in fecal samples was collected from 200 samples from patients with bacterial issue ordered. For evaluation of E-swab, 22 frozen, unfixed samples that were positive for intestinal parasites was used. Twelve positive E-swab samples was used as comparative positive controls. This was analyzed using real-time PCR. Bacteria was counted for 9.5% of the infections whilst parasites counted for 14% of the infections. The conclusion was that E-swab could replace SAF-fixative in the diagnosis of intestinal parasites and that there is that an underdiagnosis of intestinal parasites.

    Keywords: Cryptosporidium spp, Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Giardia intestinalis, real-time PCR, E-swab, prevalence.

  • 4.
    Bengnér, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Béziat, Vivien
    Department of Medicine, Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bengt-Olof
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Malmberg, Karl Johan
    Department of Medicine, Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Independent skewing of the T cell and NK cell compartments associated with cytomegalovirus infection suggests division of labor between innate and adaptive immunity.2014In: Age (Omaha), ISSN 0161-9152, E-ISSN 1574-4647, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 571-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection induces profound changes in different subsets of the cellular immune system. We have previously identified an immune risk profile (IRP) where CMV-associated changes in the T cell compartment, defined as a CD4/CD8 ratio < 1, are associated with increased mortality in elderly people. Since natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in the defense against viral infections, we examined whether the expansion of CD8 + T cells seen in individuals with CD4/CD8 ratio < 1 is coupled to a parallel skewing of the NK cell compartment. A number of 151 subjects were examined with CMV serology and a flow cytometry panel for assessment of T cell and NK cell subsets. CMV-seropositive individuals had higher frequencies of CD57 + and NKG2C + NK cells and lower frequencies of NKG2A + NK cells, in line with a more differentiated NK cell compartment. Intriguingly, however, there was no correlation between CD4/CD8 ratio and NK cell repertoires among CMV-seropositive donors, despite the profound skewing of the T cell compartment in the group with CD4/CD8 ratio < 1. Conversely, donors with profound expansion of NK cells, defined as NKG2C + NK cells with high expression of CD57 and ILT-2, did not display more common changes in their T cell repertoire, suggesting that NK cell expansion is independent of the T cell-defined IRP. Altogether, these results indicate that the effect of CMV on CD8 T cells and NK cells is largely nonoverlapping and independent.

  • 5.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Didactics in Social Sciences.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

    Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

    Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

    Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-08-22 00:00
  • 6.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Division of Medical Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Peri-radiographic guidelines for children with autism spectrum disorder: a nationwide survey in Sweden2017In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of guidelines and routines used nationwide when children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are taken care of and examined in a radiology department during a peri-radiographic process.

    METHOD: A nationwide survey was compiled and distributed to 94 radiology departments throughout Sweden, i.e. those performing more than 100 000 radiographic examinations annually. The survey was designed as a web questionnaire with seven questions on possible guidelines and/or routines for the departments when preparing and taking care of children with ASD in conjunction with a radiographic procedure. The data were scrutinized, using descriptive statistics.

    RESULTS: In total, 86 radiology departments responded to the survey (response rate 92%). Of those departments, 40 did not examine children with ASD. None of the departments included in the study had existing guidelines underpinning the routines when preparing and performing radiographic examinations for children diagnosed with ASD. A few departments (n = 8) would set aside more time for the procedure if it were known in advance that the child to be examined had been diagnosed with ASD. Also, some departments (n = 7) had radiographers who were more experienced in the care of children who would be appointed to perform examinations for children with ASD.

    CONCLUSION: It is suggested that guidelines should be developed in order to increase interaction in a supportive way and decrease anxiety during the peri-radiographic process with children with ASD.

  • 7.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Are radiographers prepared to meet children with special needs, when seen for an examination?2017In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 58, no 1 Suppl., p. 16-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Anxiety is often experienced by children undergoing health care procedures, and children with autism spectrum disorders (ADS) experience more anxiety than typically developed children. A prerequisite for obtaining an optimum procedure is firstly based on the health care provider’s knowledge about children with ASD, but may also depend on the use of guidelines. Two previous national surveys showed, that none radiology or paediatric departments and a minority of anaesthesiology departments throughout Sweden use specific guidelines when seeing children with ASD. Following, the purpose was to develop guidelines to use when caring for and preparing children with ASD in those settings.

    Methods: A modified Delphi method was used, including19 experts identified from the two afore mentioned surveys. The questions considered in the process, proceeded from previous research and the results from the surveys. The experts’ responses regarding the importance of each item, were analysed and scrutinized between each round.

    Results: The Delphi process resulted in guidelines consisting of 15 items and a checklist with 16 aspects. The items cover the areas: planning and involving parents, features in the environment, use of time, communication, thehealth care professionals. The checklist covers the child’spattern of communication, anxiety, sensory stimuli, special interests and likes/dislikes.

    Conclusions: To obtain an optimum caring encounter when a child with ASD is seen in the preoperative and radiology setting, a meticulous planning is important and the environment should be adjusted for the needs of the child. To accomplish this, guidelines need to be in place and be followed.

  • 8.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Ekedahl, Susanne
    Rosenlund Primary Care Unit, Jönköping, 551 85, Sweden.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Division of Clinical Physiology, Department of Medicine and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University; and Department of Clinical Physiology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bronchial responsiveness to dry air hyperventilation in smokers may predict decline in airway status using indirect methods2013In: Lung, ISSN 0341-2040, E-ISSN 1432-1750, Vol. 191, no 2, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Disabling respiratory symptoms and rapid decline of lung function may occur in susceptible tobacco smokers. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) elicited by direct challenge methods predicts worse lung function outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BHR to isocapnic hyperventilation of dry air (IHDA) was associated with rapid deterioration in airway status and respiratory symptoms.

    Methods

    One hundred twenty-eight smokers and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals with no history of smoking were investigated. All subjects completed a questionnaire. Spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) measurements were recorded before and after 4 min of IHDA. The tests were repeated after 3 years in 102 smokers and 11 controls.

    Results

    Eighty-five smokers (66 %) responded to the challenge with a ≥2.4-Hz increase in resonant frequency (F res), the cutoff limit defining BHR, as recorded by IOS. They had higher F res at baseline compared to nonresponding smokers [12.8 ± 3.2 vs. 11.5 ± 3.4 Hz (p < 0.05)] and lower FEV1 [83 ± 13 vs. 89 ± 13 % predicted (p < 0.05)]. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that wheezing (odds ratio = 3.7, p < 0.01) and coughing (odds ratio = 8.1, p < 0.05) were significantly associated with hyperresponsiveness. An increase in F res was recorded after 3 years in responding smokers but not in nonresponders or controls. The difference remained when subjects with COPD were excluded.

    Conclusions

    The proportion of hyperresponsive smokers was unexpectedly high and there was a close association between wheezing and coughing and BHR. Only BHR could discriminate smokers with rapid deterioration of airway status from others.

  • 9.
    Bölte, S.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mahdi, S.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coghill, D.
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Gau, S. S. -F
    National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Holtmann, M.
    University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Karande, S.
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, F.
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Rohde, L. A.
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Segerer, W.
    Swiss Paraplegic Research, Nottwil, Switzerland.
    de Vries, P. J.
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Selb, M.
    ICF Research Branch a cooperation partner within the WHO Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifcations in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.
    Standardised assessment of functioning in ADHD: consensus on the ICF Core Sets for ADHD2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with significant impairments in social, educational, and occupational functioning, as well as specific strengths. Currently, there is no internationally accepted standard to assess the functioning of individuals with ADHD. WHO’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health—child and youth version (ICF) can serve as a conceptual basis for such a standard. The objective of this study is to develop a comprehensive, a common brief, and three age-appropriate brief ICF Core Sets for ADHD. Using a standardised methodology, four international preparatory studies generated 132 second-level ICF candidate categories that served as the basis for developing ADHD Core Sets. Using these categories and following an iterative consensus process, 20 ADHD experts from nine professional disciplines and representing all six WHO regions selected the most relevant categories to constitute the ADHD Core Sets. The consensus process resulted in 72 second-level ICF categories forming the comprehensive ICF Core Set—these represented 8 body functions, 35 activities and participation, and 29 environmental categories. A Common Brief Core Set that included 38 categories was also defined. Age-specific brief Core Sets included a 47 category preschool version for 0–5 years old, a 55 category school-age version for 6–16 years old, and a 52 category version for older adolescents and adults 17 years old and above. The ICF Core Sets for ADHD mark a milestone toward an internationally standardised functional assessment of ADHD across the lifespan, and across educational, administrative, clinical, and research settings. © 2018 The Author(s)

  • 10. Carlberg, L.
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of SwedenIn: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Carlsson, Emma
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    The importance of psychological and physical stressors on diabetes-related immunity in a young population – an interdisciplinary approach2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of immunological disorders such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasingly common amongst children, adolescents and young adults. There is also an increase in psychosomatic symptoms (depression, insomnia, anxiety, headaches and fatigue etc.) as well as a decrease in physical activity amongst young people, affecting the well-being and overall health of our younger population. It is therefore important to study the effects of psychological and physical stressors on the immune system, to evaluate their impact on juvenile health.

    Aim: This thesis explores the impact of psychological and physical stressors on the cellular immune system with special focus on diabetes-related immunity in a young population, using an interdisciplinary approach.

    Method: When exploring the impact of psychological and physical stressors such as psychological stress due to exposure to psychological stressful experiences or degree of physical activity/training on the cellular immune system in children, adolescents and young women, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid (TT) and β-lactoglobulin (βLG)) as well as diabetes-related autoantigens (insulin, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), tyrosine phosphatase-2 (IA-2) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)) and secreted cytokines and chemokines were measured by multiplex fluorochrome technique (Luminex). Populations of Thelper (Th) cells (CD4+), T-cytotoxic (Tc) cells (CD8+), B cells (CD19+), Natural Killer (NK) cells (CD56+CD16+) as well as regulatory T (Treg) cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127-), and their expression of CD39 and CD45RA were studied by flow cytometry. Diabetes-related parameters (glucose, C-peptide,proinsulin, pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY) were measured to studyβ-cell activity and appetite regulation and cortisol was used as a biological marker for psychological and physical stress.

    Results: Children in families exposed to psychological stress showed an imbalanced cellular immune response as well as an increased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens. Also, previous exposure to psychological stress as well as current exposure to psychological stress in young women showed an increased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens. Further, previous exposure to psychological stress in young women showed increased numbers of circulating CD56+CD16+ NK cells as wellas decreased numbers of circulating CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- Treg cells. High physical activity in children showed decreased spontaneous immune response as well as a decreased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens, while low physical activity in children showed an increased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens. Further, endurance training in adolescents, especially in adolescent males and young adolescents, showed an increased immune response towards the diabetes-related autoantigen IA-2.

    Conclusion: It is evident that psychological and physical stressors such as exposure to psychological stress and degree of physical activity/training impact the cellular immune system. Experiences associated with psychological stress seem to have a negative effect on the cellular immune system in a young population, causing an imbalance in the immune system that could possibly induce diabetes-related immunity. High physical activity in children seems to have a protective effect against diabetes-related immunity. In contrast, low physical activity in children and endurance training in adolescents seems to induce diabetes-related immunity. It is very likely that psychological stressful experiences, low physical activity and intense training such as endurance training all play important roles in the immunological process leading to the development of type 1 diabetes.

  • 12.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Psychological Stress in Children May Alter the Immune Response2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and β-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, β-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p < 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing β cells.

  • 13.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Ludvigsson, J.
    Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n  = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65, insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P  < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

  • 14. Cherfan, Pierre
    et al.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Jonasson, Lena
    Effects of simvastatin on human T cells in vivo2007In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 193, no 1, p. 186-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Studies on expression and regulation of phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase 2 in gastrointestinal tissues with special reference to colorectal cancer1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 16.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Löfgren, Sture
    Hugander, Anders
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Expression and gene polymorphisms of the chemokine CXCL5 in colorectal cancer patients2007In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 97-102Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Löfgren, Sture
    Hugander, Anders
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Polymorphisms of Fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 and plasma levels of its ligand CX3CL1 in colorectal cancer patients2007In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1195-200Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Gustafson-Svärd, C
    Weström, B
    Tagesson, C
    Söderkvist, P
    Group I phospholipase A2 mRNA expression in rat glandular stomach and pancreas: Ontogenic development and effects of cortisone acetate.1992In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1130, no 1, p. 47-51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hong, Thaitrinh
    Vietnam National University.
    Nguyen, Linh Tu Thi
    Vietnam National University.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Common 4977 bp deletion and novel alterations in mitochondrial DNA in Vietnamese patients with breast cancer2015In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 4, p. 1-7, article id 58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis and ageing. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion is one of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations in human tissues and may play a role in breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion in BC tissue and its association with clinical factors.

    We determined the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion in cancer and normal paired tissue samples from 106 Vietnamese patients with BC by sequencing PCR products.

    The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion was significantly more frequent in normal tissue in comparison with paired cancer tissue. Moreover, the incidence of the 4977 bp deletion in BC tissue was significantly higher in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive as compared with ER negative BC tissue. Preliminary results showed, in cancerous tissue, a significantly higher incidence of novel deletions in the group of patients with lymph node metastasis in comparison with the patients with no lymph node metastasis.

    We have found 4977 bp deletion in mtDNA to be a common event in BC and with special reference to ER positive BC. In addition, the novel deletions were shown to be related to lymph node metastasis. Our finding may provide complementary information in prediction of clinical outcome including metastasis, recurrence and survival of patients with BC.

  • 20.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hugander, A
    Sirsjo, A
    Decreased levels of precursor transforming growth factor beta1 in human colorectal cancer.2001In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 597-601Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hugander, A
    Sirsjö, A
    Söderkvist, P
    Enhanced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear beta-catenin are related to mutations in the APC gene in human colorectal cancer.2001In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 21, no 2A, p. 911-915Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hugander, Anders
    Häll-Karlsson, Britt-Marie
    Sirsjö, Allan
    RFX-B, a MHC class II transcription factor, suppressed in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.2002In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 213-216Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hugander, Anders
    Löfgren, Sture
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Polymorphism and circulating levels of the chemokine CXCL12 in colorectal cancer patients2007In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hugander, Anders
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Expression of CD137 and CD137 ligand in colorectal cancer patients2006In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1197-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hugander, Anders
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Protein expression of the chemokine, CCL28, in human colorectal cancer.2006In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 315-319Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lilja, I
    Weström, B
    Tagesson, C
    Söderkvist, P
    Gustafson-Svärd, C
    Ontogeny of group II phospholipase A2 gene expression in rat stomach and ileum.1995In: Biology of the Neonate, ISSN 0006-3126, E-ISSN 1421-9727, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 113-121Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Samuelsson, A
    Hugander, A
    Söderkvist, P
    Differential expression of cyclooxygenase 2 in human colorectal cancer.1999In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 730-732Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Samuelsson, A
    Hugander, A
    Söderkvist, P
    Gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2, group II and cytosolic phospholipase A2 in human colorectal cancer.1998In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 18, no 5A, p. 3283-3287Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zar, Niklas
    Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Protein expression and gene polymorphism of CXCL10 in patients with colorectal cancer2014In: Biomedical Reports, ISSN 2049-9442, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 340-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) promote leukocyte attraction to sites of inflammation and cancer. Certain chemokines promote and regulate neoplastic progression, including metastasis and angiogenesis. One such chemokine, CXCL10, was found to be expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue. To gain insight into the prognostic significance of CXCL10, we investigated whether the levels of this chemokine were altered in the colorectal tissue or plasma of CRC patients. Using Luminex technology for protein analyses, we observed a significantly higher CXCL10 protein level in cancer tissue compared to that in paired normal tissue. Moreover, significantly higher plasma levels of CXCL10 were detected in patients compared to those in control subjects and the plasma levels of CXCL10 in disseminated disease were found to be significantly higher compared to those in localized disease. The single‑nucleotide polymorphism rs8878, which has been described in exon 4 in the 3'‑untranslated region of the CXCL10 gene, was investigated using a TaqMan system. There were significant differences in genotype distribution and allelic frequencies between CRC patients and control subjects. In conclusion, altered CXCL10 protein concentrations in CRC tissues or plasma and the rs8878 genotype variant of CXCL10 may contribute to the prediction of clinical outcome.

  • 30.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Department of Surgery, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gene polymorphism in DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC6 and association with colorectal cancer in Swedish patients2016In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, no 9, p. 736-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC6 have been proposed to participate in the pathological process of cancer by modulating the DNA repair capacity. This study evaluated the susceptibility of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) XRCC1 (rs25487, G > A) and XRCC6 (rs2267437, C > G) to colorectal cancer (CRC) and their association with clinical parameters in Swedish patients with CRC. Using the TaqMan system, these SNPs were screened in 452 patients and 464 controls. No significant difference in genotype distribution was found between the patients and controls, or any significant association with cancer-specific or disease-free survival in patients. However, we showed that the carriers of allele A in XRCC1 (rs25487, G > A) were connected with a higher risk of disseminated CRC (Odds Ratio = 1.64; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.12–2.41, p = 0.012).

  • 31.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Zar, Niklas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Department of Laboratory Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Polymorphism of the p38 beta gene in patients with colorectal cancer2014In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 8, p. 1093-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways have been proposed to participate in the pathological process of cancer by affecting inflammation, proliferation, metastasis and cell survival. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs2235356, ‑1628A→G) in the promoter region of the p38β gene has been proposed as a genetic modifier for colorectal cancer (CRC) in a Chinese population. The present study evaluated the susceptibility of patients possessing this SNP to CRC, in addition to determining its association with clinical parameters in Swedish patients with CRC. Using the LightSNiP genotyping assay, this SNP was screened in 389 patients with CRC and 517 control subjects. No significant difference in the genotype distribution or in the allelic frequencies was identified between the two groups nor was any association identified with the clinical parameters. These findings indicate that the ‑1628A→G polymorphism of the p38β gene is not significantly associated with a susceptibility to CRC in a Swedish population.

  • 32.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Ström, Karin
    Dep. of Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital Jönköping Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Dep. of Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zar, Niklas
    Dep. of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindh, Mikael
    Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Dep. of Laboratory Medicin, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    DNA promoter methylation status and protein expression of interleukin-8 in human colorectal adenocarcinomas2012In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 709-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  Interleukin-8 (IL-8) also referred to as CXCL8, a member of the CXC chemokine family that attracts neutrophils and other leukocytes, has been associated with cancer. Angiogenesis is a prime regulator of tumour expansion and data support that IL-8 is a potent angiogenic factor. Epigenomic instability has been postulated to play a role for the development of multiple neoplasias including colorectal cancer (CRC). DNA methylation of cytosine residues in CpG dinucleotides leads to transcriptional silencing of associated genes.

    Method  In this study, we comparatively analysed the protein expression of IL-8 in plasma, tumour and paired normal tissue and methylation status of the IL-8 gene to evaluate its impact on CRC.

    Results  Collectively, by using Luminex technology, we noted a significantly higher IL-8 level in cancer tissue compared to paired normal tissue and that CRC patients exhibit significantly higher plasma levels than healthy controls. Analysed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, we detected IL-8 hypomethylation in 64% of the cancerous tissue cases but no hypomethylation was found in paired normal tissue. We noted that the CRC patients with IL-8 hypomethylation revealed a significant higher level of IL-8 protein in cancerous tissue, which tended to be associated with distant metastasis. We also observed that patients with distant metastasis showed a significantly higher plasma level of IL-8 in relation to patients without distant metastasis.

    Conclusion  Our results suggest that the predominance of high plasma levels of IL-8 in patients with distant metastasis in combination with the hypomethylation of the IL-8 promoter region might be a useful marker of the disease advancement.

  • 33.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Thai, Trinh Hong
    Key Laboratory of Enzyme and Protein Technology, College of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zar, Niklas
    Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Detection of Cytomegalovirus DNA in Colorectal Tissue from Swedish and Vietnamese Patients with Colorectal Cancer2013In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 4947-4950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been implicated as a factor, which might be associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. Data from studies with HCMV-infected tumour cell lines have highlighted an oncomodulatory potential of HCMV. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HCMV DNA in CRC tissue compared to matched normal tissue, and its association with clinical factors.

    Patients and Methods: We used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HCMV DNA in 202 cancerous and paired normal tissue from Swedish (n=119) and Vietnamese (n=83) CRC patients.

    Results: Overall, the HCMV DNA rate was significantly higher in cancerous in relation to paired normal tissue. Furthermore, a significantly higher frequency (39.8%) of HCMV DNA was observed in cancer tissues from the Vietnamese patients compared to the Swedish patients (15.1%). The prevalence of HCMV DNA in CRC tissue of 50% of those with disseminated disease tended to be higher compared to those with localized disease, with a prevalence of 33.3% in Vietnamese patients.

    Conclusion: Our observations indicate that the prevalence of HCMV DNA differs significantly between cancer and matched normal tissues. Thus, these data support a possible role of CMV in CRC. Moreover, we noted differences between Swedish and Vietnamese patients, indicating a role of ethnicity.

  • 34.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Thai, Trinh Hong
    Vietnam National University.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Zar, Niklas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Novel and Differential Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA Deletions in Swedish and Vietnamese Patients with Colorectal Cancer2014In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 147-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis and aging. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion is one of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations in human tissues and may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion in CRC tissues and its association with clinical factors. Patients and Methods: We determined the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion in cancer and normal paired tissue samples from 105 Swedish and 88 Vietnamese patients with CRC using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Results: The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion was shown to be significantly more frequent in normal tissues in comparison with paired cancer tissues in both Swedish and Vietnamese patients. The 4977 bp common deletion was significantly more frequent in cancer tissues of the Vietnamese patients compared to the Swedish patients, and in Vietnamese cancer tissues, the 4977 bp deletion was significantly over represented in those with localized disease compared to those with disseminated disease. Moreover, we detected nine novel mtDNA deletions and found a significantly higher rate of these in CRC tissues in Swedish in comparison to Vietnamese patients. Conclusion: The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion seems to have an impact on the clinical outcome of CRC in Vietnamese patients, that the Swedish patients accumulate more of the detected novel deletions in CRC tissue compared to Vietnamese patients probably indicates divergent mechanisms in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  • 35.
    Ekman, Emma
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Hur kroppens position påverkar antalet avbrott i den isobariska konturen under högupplöst esophagusmanometri2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced motility in the esophagus can be a cause of dysphagia. High-resolution esophagus manometry (HRM) is the golden standard for evaluating esophageal motility. Defects of the motility can be seen as disruptions in the isobaric contour (IBC). There is a correlation between disruptions and incomplete bolus clearance. The references for HRM are made for the patient to lie down and swallow for the examination. The position of the body affects the esophagus and the values for HRM changes significantly depending on whether the patients is lying down or sitting up. There are discussions about whether the procedure should include both supine and sitting position to increase diagnostic reliability. This study included 12 patients who voluntarily underwent 10 additional swallows sitting up in addition to the supine position. A comparison of the disruptions in IBC was made between the swallows sitting and supine. The results showed that 24 out of 118 supine swallows had disruptions in IBC and 94 were without. When the patients sat up, 68 out of 120 swallows had disruptions in IBC and 52 were without. The hypothesis was confirmed as there were more disruptions in the sitting position and the disruptions were longer. Further studies are required.

  • 36. Elander, N
    et al.
    Zhou, J
    Ungerbäck, J
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Söderkvist, P
    Association between adenomatosis polyposis coli functional status and microsomal prostaglandin E synthethase-1 expression in colorectal cancer2009In: Molecular Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0899-1987, E-ISSN 1098-2744Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    A Useful Guide for Analysis of Immune Markers by Fluorochrome (Luminex) Technique.2014In: Cytokine Bioassays: Methods and Protocols, Methods in Molecular Biology. / [ed] Ivana Vancurova., Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, p. 87-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Children diagnosed with both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease - an Immunological challenge2016In: Immunoendocrinology, ISSN 2378-3079, Vol. 3, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease are both characterized by an autoimmune feature. As T1D and celiac disease share several common risk factors such as environment, genetics and immune dysregulation, patients have risk of developing the other disease subsequently. Patients with manifest T1D may have had a latent celiac disease, which is activated parallel to the anti-islet immune reactivity during the development of T1D. Contrary, a low prevalence of β-cell autoimmunity is found in young patients with celiac disease.

    The role of antigen-specific T cells and their relation to cytokines and chemokines is not well characterized in children with combination of T1D and celiac disease. Defective regulation and an impaired ability of responder T cells to be suppressed are suggested to contribute. We have previously shown that children suffering from these two immunological diseases in combination have a suppressed immune response to several antigens for example food antigens like gluten. Low percentages of both early and late effector memory CD8+ cells together with observations of immune aberrancies seen in the gut, in children who are prone to T1D, may suggests poor development of oral tolerance that may predispose for development of celiac disease.    

    This review highlights the immunological complexity in these two common pediatric immunological disorders that indicates that the combination of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease is an immunological challenge. It is obvious that we are far from understanding the immunological impact of these two autoimmune diseases in combination. This immunological challenge therefore needs to be elucidated to be able to predict and prevent these autoimmune diseases. 

  • 39.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Enzyme Linked Immuno-Spot; a Useful Tool in the Search for Elusive Immune Markers in Common Pediatric Immunological Diseases2012In: Cells, ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 141-152Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to provide better therapy we strive to increase our knowledge of how the immune system behaves and communicates in common pediatric immunological diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, allergic and celiac diseases. However, when dealing with pediatric diseases, where study subjects are almost exclusively children, blood volumes available for immunological studies are limited and as such must be carefully handled and used to their full extent. Single immune markers can easily be detected by a traditional Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), whereas multiple markers can be detected by a fluorochrome (Luminex) or electrochemiluminescence (MSD) technique. These techniques however are sometimes not sensitive enough to detect low levels of secreted immune markers in limited sample sizes. To detect immune markers at the single-cell level, an Enzyme Linked Immuno-spot (ELISPOT) can be used to pin-point elusive immune markers in common pediatric immunological diseases.

  • 40.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    The Challenge of Measuring Elusive Immune Markers by Enzyme-Linked Immuno-Spot (ELISPOT) Technique.2014In: Cytokine Bioassays: Methods and Protocols, Methods in Molecular Biology. / [ed] Ivana Vancurova, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, p. 3-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    The link between psychological stress and autoimmune response in children2015In: Critical Reviews in Immunology, ISSN 1040-8401, E-ISSN 2162-6472, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 117-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is defined as a state of threatened homeostasis or disharmony that is counteracted by a complex repertoire of physiological and behavioral adaptive responses in order to establish homeostasis. Confronted with a stressful condition, the nervous and immune systems initiate a coping process to maintain homeostasis in the body. Psychological stress, recognized as a public health issue in children and young adults, may be one mechanism to induce and maintain autoimmunity in children. It is necessary to increase our understanding of how psychological stress can affect the immune system at a young age because autoimmune diseases, especially type 1 diabetes, are alarmingly common in children. Psychological stress may be involved in other autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, that frequently occur in children as well. This review summarizes the studies attempting to evaluate the link between psychological stress and autoimmune response in children. A number of them have observed that the autoimmune disease itself causes psychological stress. We are far from fully understanding how long-term psychological stress is linked to autoimmune response in children with a high risk of, or already diagnosed, autoimmune disease.

  • 42. Forsey, R J
    et al.
    Thompson, J M
    Ernerudh, J
    Hurst, T L
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Johansson, B
    Nilsson, B-O
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Plasma cytokine profiles in elderly humans.2003In: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, ISSN 0047-6374, E-ISSN 1872-6216, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 487-493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Fransén, Karin
    et al.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Osterström, Anna
    Olsson, Anneli
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Sirsjö, Allan
    Nitric oxide synthase 2 mRNA expression in relation to p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli mutations in primary colorectal adenocarcinomas.2002In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 131, no 4, p. 384-392Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44. Fransén, Karin
    et al.
    Klintenäs, Maria
    Osterström, Anna
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Monstein, Hans-Jürg
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Mutation analysis of the BRAF, ARAF and RAF-1 genes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.2004In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 527-533Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Vorkapic, Emina
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Folkesson, Maggie
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Welander, Martin
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Department of Laboratory Services, County Hospital Ryhov.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Länne, Toste
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Skogberg, Josefin
    Division of Vascular Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Altered PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha expression in abdominal aortic aneurysm: Possible effects on mitochondrial biogenesis2016In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 53, no 1-2, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex and deadly vascular disorder. The pathogenesis of AAA includes destruction and phenotypic alterations of the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and aortic tissues. PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) regulates VSMC migration and matrix formation and is a major inducer of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, including oxidative metabolism. Methods: Protein and gene expression of PGC1α and markers for mitochondria biogenesis and cell type-specificity were analysed in AAA aortas from humans and mice and compared against control aortas. Results: Gene expression of PPARGC1A was decreased in human AAA and angiotensin (Ang) II-induced AAA in mice when compared to control vessels. However, high expression of PGC1α was detected in regions of neovascularisation in the adventitia layer. In contrast, the intima/media layer of AAA vessel exhibited defective mitochondrial biogenesis as indicated by low expression of PPARGC1A, VDAC, ATP synthase and citrate synthase. Conclusion: Our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis is impaired in AAA in synthetic SMCs in the media, with the exception of newly formed supporting vessels in the adventitia where the mitochondrial markers seem to be intact. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating PGC1α and mitochondria biogenesis in AAA.

  • 46.
    Genberg, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Ahlgren, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Avparaffinering  med Xylen versus Ttissue- clear för vävnadsmaterial vid flödescytometrisk analys av DNA ploidi2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 47.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Perioperative and anesthesia guidelines for children with autism: A nationwide survey from Sweden2016In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, ISSN 0196-206X, E-ISSN 1536-7312, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 457-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The overall aim of this study was to describe the current set of guidelines for the preparation and care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the perioperative setting across Sweden and explore the content of these guidelines in detail.

    Method: An online questionnaire was distributed to the chairpersons of all anesthesia departments (n = 68) and pediatric departments (n = 38) throughout Sweden. Follow-up phone calls were made to those departments that did not return the questionnaire. The presence of guidelines was analyzed through descriptive statistics. These guidelines and comments on routines used in these departments were analyzed inspired by conventional content analysis.

    Results: Seven of the 68 anesthesia departments and none of the 38 pediatric departments across Sweden have guidelines for preparing and/or administering care to children with ASD within the perioperative setting. From the guidelines and routines used, 3 categories emerge: "lacking the necessary conditions," "no extra considerations needed," and "care with specific consideration for children with ASD." These 3 categories span a continuum in the care. In the first category, the anesthesia induction could result in the child with ASD being physically restrained. In the last category, the entire encounter with the health care service would be adapted to the specific needs of the child.

    Conclusion: There is a lack of evidence-based guidelines specifically designed to meet the needs of children with ASD in the preoperative period in Sweden. Further research is needed to understand if children with ASD would benefit from evidence-based guidelines.

  • 48.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Almqvist, L
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation in school environments of children and youth with disabilities2001In: Developmental medicine and child neurology. Supplement 89, Volume 43: Abstracts: European Academy of Childhood Disability, 13th annual meeting, Göteborg, 2001, London: MacKeith , 2001, p. 19-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49. Gustafsson, B.
    et al.
    Danielsson, H
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Gustafsson, P.
    Prochzkoska, M.
    Hyperactivity precedes conduct problem in preschool childrenIn: BJPsych Open, ISSN 0375-7633, E-ISSN 0717-7917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. Hadrup, Sine Reker
    et al.
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Køllgaard, Tania
    Seremet, Tina
    Johansson, Boo
    Pawelec, Graham
    thor Straten, Per
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Longitudinal studies of clonally expanded CD8 T cells reveal a repertoire shrinkage predicting mortality and an increased number of dysfunctional cytomegalovirus-specific T cells in the very elderly.2006In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 176, no 4, p. 2645-2653Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 114
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