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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. University College of Kristianstad,Kristianstad.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation.
    Sense of coherence of reindeer herders and other Samis in comparison to other Swedish citizens2013In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 72, p. -20633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Samis are indigenous people in north Europe. In the territory called Sa´pmi (Lapland), reindeer herding is the traditional base for the Sami economy. The relation between living conditions and positive health of the Swedish Samis has been sparsely studied. As health is closely linked to sense of coherence (SOC), an understanding of the background factors to SOC may contribute knowledge that might be useful in promoting living conditions and health.

    Methods. The study examines relations between the level of SOC and background factors from surveys in a Sami population (n=613) in comparison to a non-Sami population (n=525) in Sweden, and in comparison between 2 subsamples of Samis, that is, herders and non-herders.

    Results. There are more similarities than differences between the Sami and non-Sami populations. However, dividing the Sami population, reindeer herders had significantly lower SOC, and in specific the subcomponent manageability, that is, less ability to use available resources to meet different demands in life, compared to non-herders.

    Conclusions. In addition to age and health, predictors of SOC are related to the life form of reindeer husbandry and the belonging to the herding community

  • 2. Abrahamsson, K H
    et al.
    Berggren, U
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Carlsson, S G
    Phobic avoidance and regular dental care in fearful dental patients: a comparative study.2001In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Abrahamsson, K H
    et al.
    Stenman, J
    Ohrn, K
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Attitudes to dental hygienists: evaluation of the Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey in a Swedish population of patients and students.2007In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to evaluate and test the psychometric properties of the Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey (DHBS) in a Swedish sample of different patient groups and students. It was hypothesized that negative dental hygienist beliefs would discriminate between fearful and non-fearful study groups. The DHBS was distributed together with the revised Dental Beliefs Survey (DBS-R) and the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). The study sample included 394 subjects (130 students, 144 general dental patients, 90 periodontal patients and 30 patients on a waiting list for dental fear treatment). The results verified that the DHBS discriminates well between dentally fearful and non-fearful study groups. The DHBS had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96-0.98) in all the groups. The correlation between the DHBS and the DBS-R was high (rho = 0.82, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the DHBS correlated significantly with the DAS, as well as with a low but significant correlation to age (more negative attitudes in younger age groups) and gender (more negative attitudes amongst women). Regression analysis showed that gender and the DHBS items: 23, 16 and 28, i.e. items related to feeling helpless, worries/fears not being taken seriously and fear about 'bad news' possibly preventing treatment, were the most important predictors of dental fear. The results suggest that the DHBS may be a valid and reliable scale to use in order to assess patient's specific attitudes to dental hygienists. However, the psychometric properties including test-retest analysis and the underlying factor structure of the DHBS need to be further explored.

  • 4. Abrahamsson, Kajsa H
    et al.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Stenman, Jane
    Ohrn, Kerstin
    Dental beliefs: evaluation of the Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey in different patient groups and in a non-clinical student sample.2006In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to test the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey (DBS-R) in different patient groups and in a non-clinical sample of students. It was hypothesized that negative dental beliefs, assessed using the DBS-R, would discriminate between fearful and non-fearful study groups. The questionnaire was distributed together with the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). The sample included 550 adults who responded to the questionnaires (206 students, 177 general dental patients, 105 periodontal patients and 62 patients at a waiting list for dental-fear treatment). The internal drop-out rate was low. The results confirmed that the DBS-R discriminates well between fearful patients and the other study groups. The DBS-R had a high internal consistency in all the study groups. Furthermore, the DBS-R correlated significantly with age (higher values in younger age groups) and the DAS. Regression analyses showed that the DBS-R subdimensions of 'communication' and 'control'/or 'trust', respectively, were significant predictors for dental fear. The results suggest that the DBS-R is a reliable and valid instrument for use in different Swedish patient- and non-clinical population groups in order to assess attitudes to dentists. However, the underlying factor structure of the DBS-R needs to be further explored and established.

  • 5. Abrahamsson, Kajsa Henning
    et al.
    Berggren, Ulf
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Carlsson, Sven G
    The importance of dental beliefs for the outcome of dental-fear treatment.2003In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Adiels, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Helkimo, Martti
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tactile stimulation as a complementary treatment of temporomandibular disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: A pilot study.2005In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ahl, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Maxillofacial Unit, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Translation and validation of the English-language instrument Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionair into Swedish2021In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In orthognathic surgery, understanding the patient’s motives for treatment is a key factor for postoperative patient satisfaction and treatment success. In countries/systems where orthognathic surgery is funded by public means, patients are referred mainly due to functional problems, although studies of quality of life related changes after treatment indicate that psychosocial and aesthetic reasons might be equal or more important for the patient. There is no available validated condition specific instruments in the Swedish language for quality of life evaluation of patients with dentofacial deformities.

    Aims/objectives: Cross cultural translation and adaptation of the English-language instrument ‘Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire’ (OQLQ) into Swedish.

    Methods: OQLQ was translated into Swedish. A total of 121 patients in four groups were recruited and the Swedish version of the OQLQ (OQLQ-S) was tested by psychometric methods. Reliability was assessed by internal consistency and test–retest reliability. Validity was evaluated by face, convergent and discriminant validity.

    Results/findings and conclusions: OQLQ-S is reliable and showed good construct validity and internal consistency and can be used in a Swedish speaking population as a complement to clinical variables to evaluate patients with dentofacial deformity. 

  • 8. Ahlqwist, M
    et al.
    Bengtsson, C
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hägglin, C
    Dental status of women in a 24-year longitudinal and cross-sectional study: Results from a population study of women in Göteborg.1999In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 162-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ekman, Aimée
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hedén, Lena
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Laakso, Katja
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Oxelmark, Lena
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Health-promoting factors among students in higher education within health care and social work: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data in a multicentre longitudinal study2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Educational environments are considered important in strengthening students’ health status and knowledge, which are associated with good educational outcomes. It has been suggested to establish healthy universities based on a salutogenic approach – namely, health promotion. The aim of this study was to describe health-promoting resources and factors among first-semester students in higher education in healthcare and social work.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study is based on a survey distributed among all students in seven healthcare and social work programmes at six universities in southern Sweden. The survey was carried out in 2018 using a self-reported, web-based questionnaire focussing on general health and well-being, lifestyle factors together with three validated instruments measuring health-promoting factors and processes: the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ).

    Results: Of 2283 students, 851 (37.3%) completed the survey, of whom 742 (87.1%) were women; 722 (84.8%) were enrolled on healthcare programmes, and 129 (15.2%) were enrolled on social work programmes. Most reported good general health and well-being (88.1% and 83.7%, respectively). The total mean scores for the SOC scale, SHIS and OBQ were, respectively, 59.09 (SD = 11.78), 44.04 (SD = 9.38) and 26.40 (SD = 7.07). Well-being and several healthy lifestyles were related to better general health and higher SOC, SHIS and OBQ scores. Multiple linear and logistic regressions showed that perceived well-being and no sleeping problems significantly predicted higher general health and higher SOC, SHIS and OBQ scores. Being less sedentary and non-smoking habits were significant predictors of higher SOC.

    Conclusions: Swedish students in higher education within the healthcare and social work sector report good general health and well-being in the first semester, as well as health-promoting resources (i.e. SOC, SHIS and OBQ), and in some aspects, a healthy lifestyle. High-intensity exercise, no sleeping problems and non-smoking seem to be of importance to both general health and health-promotive resources. This study contributes to knowledge about the health promotive characteristics of students in the healthcare and social work fields, which is of importance for planning universities with a salutogenic approach.

  • 10.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    The multifaceted concept of oral health: Studies on a Swedish general population and perspectives of persons with experience of long-term CPAP-treated obstructive sleep apnea2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral health is a multifaceted and changeable part of our overall health and well-being as it contributes to important everyday functions such as eating, talking, and conveying feelings. Our oral health can be affected by a range of determinants, one of which is obstructive sleep apnea [OSA] treated with continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP]. Even though xerostomia has been frequently reported upon, the possible relationship between oral health and CPAP-treated OSA is not clearly understood. The World Dental Federation [FDI] recently proposed a definition and theoretical framework of oral health, intended to be globally applicable and to move dentistry toward a more promotive approach. By using the FDI’s framework as a basis for exploration, studies in a general population can increase the understanding of different aspects of oral health and set the frame of reference for whether and how CPAP-treated OSA can be experienced to affect a person’s oral health.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of how the FDI’s theoretical framework of oral health can be applied in a general population and how oral health is experienced in a specific population of persons with increased risk for adverse oral health.

    The FDI’s framework was explored with empirical data from a general population (N=630) and a population of persons with experience of CPAP-treated OSA (N=18). In papers I and II, the FDI framework was tested and evaluated with quantitative methods (principal component analysis and structural equation modeling), using cross-sectional data from the Jönköping studies. In papers III and IV, qualitative methods (directed content analysis and critical incident technique) were used where personal views and experiences were explored using individual semi-structured interviews.

    The findings in paper I showed that factors such as dental caries, periodontal disease, experience of xerostomia, and aesthetic satisfaction can be included in the FDI’s component the core elements of oral health. In paper II, driving determinants and moderating factors were found to have direct effects on all core elements of oral health except aesthetic satisfaction. Three of the core elements of oral health (oral health-related quality of life, aesthetic satisfaction, and xerostomia) had direct effects on the latent variable overall health and well-being. Driving determinants and moderating factors had no direct effect on overall health and well-being, and no indirect effects were found. In paper III, the study participants’ views on oral health determinants were described and could be categorized into all the FDI framework dimensions. The component driving determinants could include a range of determinants affecting a person’s oral health such as CPAP treatment, age, the influence of family and social surroundings, interdental cleaning, willingness to change when needed, and relationship with oral healthcare professionals. In paper IV, the study participants described both negative and positive experiences occurring with or without their CPAP. The negative experiences included increased xerostomia, pain or discomfort, tooth wear, and negative feelings. The positive experiences included decreased xerostomia and improved oral health habits due to improved sleep. Many of the difficulties could be managed by easily accessible facilitators. The experiences the study participants described could be included in all the FDI framework components.

    In conclusion, the FDI’s framework can be applied in a general population to describe different components of oral health, and is also useful to describe a person’s views and experiences of oral health in a specific population. CPAP treatment could be considered an oral health determinant as it can affect a person’s oral health. Both positive and negative experiences can contribute to CPAP adherence as negative experiences often can be successfully managed.

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  • 11.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Univ Hosp Linkoping, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, ADULT, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Oral health-related situations among patients with experience of continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a critical incident analysis of experiences and actions2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no Suppl 1, article id P085Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    “The terrible dryness woke me up, I had some trouble breathing”- critical situations related to oral health as described by CPAP-treated persons with obstructive sleep apnea2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no 6, article id e13670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous positive airway pressure is a common and effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, but adherence remains an issue. Both obstructive sleep apnea and oral diseases are associated with cardiovascular diseases, and as oral dryness contributes to treatment abandonment, oral health is of importance for this patient group. The aim was therefore to explore how persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea experience situations associated with their oral health, and which actions they take to manage these. An explorative and descriptive design was adopted using the critical incident technique. Based on a purposeful selection, 18 adults with long-term experience of continuous positive airway pressure-treatment were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Both negative and positive situations were described. Negative situations consisted of challenges with breathing, including mouth-breathing, choking sensations, problems with night-time and daytime oral dryness, changes in the saliva composition, and deteriorating oral health. Positive situations included experiences of reduced mouth-breathing and oral dryness. The situations were often successfully managed by mimicking daytime movements, changing sleeping position, adjusting the CPAP-device and mask, increasing oral hygiene efforts, drinking water, using a humidifier or chinstrap, or contacting their oral healthcare clinic. Long-term experience of persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea regard situations and actions from everyday life. Successful management can contribute to long-term adherence and decrease negative effects on oral health. More interdisciplinary collaborations could enable identification and adequate recommendations for persons who experience negative situations during their continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 13.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Folktandvården Region Jönköpings län.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Avdelningen för Klinisk Neurofysiologi, Linköpings Universitetssjukhus, Linköping.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Inspektionen för Socialförsäkringen, Göteborg.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral hälsa och obstruktiv sömnapné- protokoll för en longitudinell studie2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Ulander, Martin
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Jansson, Henrik
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    “No one seems to know”: Studieprotokoll för utvärdering av ett teoretiskt ramverk för oral hälsa avseende reliabilitet och validitet i en obstruktiv sömnapné population2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Endodontics, Periodontology and Prosthetics, Public Dental Health, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Ola
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Endodontics, Periodontology and Prosthetics, Public Dental Health, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden; Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Clinical and self-reported measurements to be included in the core elements of the World Dental Federation's theoretical framework of oral health2021In: International Dental Journal, ISSN 0020-6539, E-ISSN 1875-595X, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Oral health is part of general health, and oral diseases share risk factors with several non-communicable diseases. The World Dental Federation (FDI) has published a theoretical framework illustrating the complex interactions between the core elements of oral health (CEOHs): driving determinants, moderating factors, and general health and well-being. However, the framework does not specify which self-reported or clinical measurements to be included in the CEOHs.

    Objectives

    To explore oral health measurements relevant for a general adult population to be included in the CEOHs in the FDI's theoretical framework of oral health.

    Materials and methods

    A psychometric study was performed, using cross-sectional data from Sweden (= 630, 54% women, mean age 49.7 years). The data set initially consisted of 186 self-reported and clinical measurements. To identify suitable measurements, the selection was discussed in different settings, including both experts and patients. Principal component analyses (PCAs) were performed to explore, reduce and evaluate measurements to be included in the three CEOHs. Internal consistency was estimated by Cronbach's Alpha.

    Results

    The validation process yielded 13 measurements (four clinical, nine self-reported) in concordance with the CEOHs. PCAs confirmed robust validity regarding the construction, predicting 60.85% of variance, representing psychosocial function (number of measurements = 5), disease and condition status (number of measurements = 4), and physiological function (number of measurements = 4). Cronbach's Alpha indicated good to sufficient internal consistency for each component in the constructs (a = 0.88, 0.68, 0.61, respectively).

    Conclusion

    In a Swedish general adult population, 13 self-reported and clinical measurements can be relevant to include to operationalise CEOHs in the FDI's theoretical framework.

  • 16.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Views about oral health determinants as described by persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea: A qualitative studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Views on oral health determinants as described by persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnoea: a qualitative study2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oral diseases have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and persons with continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP]-treated obstructive sleep apnoea [OSA] have an increased risk for negative consequences for both oral and general health. CPAP treatment is often life-long and adherence to treatment is essential. Xerostomia is a common side-effect which can lead to treatment abandonment. Oral health is a changeable part of our general health and well-being and exploring the views of oral health determinants from persons with experience of CPAP-treatment is important to prevent adverse oral health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore what persons with experience of CPAP-treated OSA view as determinants for their oral health.

    METHODS: Eighteen persons with long-term experience of CPAP-treated OSA were purposively selected. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. A code book based on the World Dental Federation's [FDI] theoretical framework for oral health was developed and used to analyse the data using directed content analysis. The domains in the framework's component driving determinants were used as pre-determined categories. Using the description of driving determinants as a guide, meaning units were extracted from the interview transcripts through an inductive approach. Then, by employing a deductive approach the code book was used to categorise the meaning units into the pre-determined categories.

    FINDINGS: The views on oral health determinants described by the informants were compatible with the five domains in the component driving determinants in the FDI's theoretical framework. Ageing, heredity, and salivation (biological and genetic factors), influences from family and the wider society (social environment), location and re-localisation (physical environment), oral hygiene habits, motivation, willingness to change, professional support (health behaviours), and availability, control, finances, and trust (access to care) were viewed as important oral health determinants by the informants.

    CONCLUSION: The study points to a variety of individual oral health-related experiences that oral healthcare professionals could consider when designing interventions to reduce xerostomia and prevent adverse oral health outcomes for persons undergoing long-term CPAP-treatment.

  • 18.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Applying World Dental Federation Theoretical Framework for Oral Health in a General Population2022In: International Dental Journal, ISSN 0020-6539, E-ISSN 1875-595X, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 536-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The World Dental Federation (FDI) has recently proposed a new definition and theoretical framework of oral health. The theoretical framework includes 4 main components and describes the relationships amongst them. In 2020, an international work group proposed the minimum Adult Oral Health Standard Set (AOHSS) of variables to measure oral health, which was mapped onto the FDI's theoretical framework. By using an empirical data set, the proposed variables in the AOHSS and the potential interactions amongst the components of the FDI's theoretical framework can be tested. The purpose of this research was to investigate structural relations of the components of the FDI's theoretical framework of oral health based on data from a general adult population.

    Methods: Data from a previously conducted Swedish cross-sectional study focusing on oral health were utilised (N = 630; women, 55.2%; mean age, 49.7 years [SD, 19.2]). Variable selection was guided by the AOHSS. Structural equation modeling was used to analyse relationships amongst the components of the FDI's theoretical model (core elements of oral health, driving determinants, moderating factors, and overall health and well-being).

    Results: The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP)-14, xerostomia, and aesthetic satisfaction had statistically significant direct effects on overall health and well-being (p < .05). Driving determinants and moderating factors had statistically significant direct effects on all core elements of oral health (p < .05) except aesthetic satisfaction (p = .616). The predictors explained 24.1% of the variance of the latent variable overall health and well-being. Based on several indices, the proposed model showed acceptable model fit.

    Conclusions: The FDI's theoretical framework can be used to describe different components of oral health and the relationship amongst them in an adult general population. Further research based on the FDI's theoretical framework in other populations and settings is needed to explore complex interactions and possible relationships that form oral health and to investigate other or additional important social determinants.

  • 19. Alm, A
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Birkhed, D
    Prevalence of approximal caries in posterior teeth in 15-year-old Swedish teenagers in relation to their caries experience at 3 years of age2007In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 392-398Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Alm, A.
    et al.
    Kärnsjukhuset, Specialistklinken Pedodonti, Dept Paediat Dent, SE-54185 Skövde, Sweden.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G.
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Dept Paediat Dent, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Birkhed, D.
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Cardiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, M.
    Cty Hosp, Futurum Acad Healthcare, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Caries in adolescence - influence from early childhood2012In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To analyse the relationship between caries determinants in early childhood and caries prevalence in proximal surfaces in adolescents at the age of 15 years. Methods: The present longitudinal study is part of a series of surveys of oral health in 671 children followed from 1 to 15 years of age. Data were selected from examinations, interviews and questionnaires at 1, 3 and 6 years and bitewing radiographs at 15 years of age. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify caries-related determinants. The outcome variable was carious lesions and fillings (DFa) in approximal tooth surfaces at 15 years of age. Statistical comparisons were made between caries-free teenagers, DFa = 0 and teenagers with DFa > 0, DFa 4 and DFa 8, respectively. Results: In the final logistic regression analyses, caries experience at 6 years and mother's self-estimation of her oral health care as being less good to poor remained statistically significant and were related to caries in all three caries groups (i.e. DF > 0, 4 and 8) at 15 years of age. The consumption of sweets at 1 year remained statistically significant, with a caries experience of DF 4 and 8. The variables 'parents born abroad' and female gender were statistically significantly associated with DFa 4 and DFa 8, respectively. Furthermore, infrequent toothbrushing habits at 3 years of age and failure to attend the examination at 1 year were statistically significantly associated with caries at 15 years in the univariable analyses. Conclusion: Early caries experience, consumption of sweets at an early age and mother's self-estimation of her oral health care as being less good to poor are associated with approximal caries in adolescents. The study indicates that caries determinants identified during early childhood have a strong impact on approximal caries in adolescence.

  • 21. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Body adiposity status in teenagers and snacking habits in early childhood in relation to approximal caries at 15 years of age2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children is steadily increasing in many countries. Dental caries and obesity are both multifactorial diseases and are associated with dietary habits.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between body weight status in adolescents and snacking habits in early childhood to approximal caries prevalence at 15 years of age.

    METHODS: This study is part of a series of surveys of oral health in children followed from the ages of 1 year to 15 years. Body adiposity status was estimated at 13.5-16.4 years using the International Obesity Task Force cut-off values [age-specific body mass index (isoBMI)]. Information about snacking habits in early childhood was collected from interviews conducted at 1 year and 3 years. Approximal caries information was obtained from bitewing radiographs at 15 years. Data related to isoBMI and approximal caries were available in 402 teenagers.

    RESULT: Adolescents with isoBMI > or = 25 (n = 64) had an approximal caries prevalence that was a mean of 1.6 times higher than those with isoBMI < 25 (n = 338) (4.64 vs. 2.94; P = 0.014). Furthermore, children's snacking habits at an early age were associated with approximal caries at 15 years.

    CONCLUSION: Overweight and obese adolescents had more approximal caries than normal-weight individuals. Moreover, the frequent consumption of snacking products during early childhood appears to be a risk indicator for caries at 15 years. Future preventive programmes should therefore include, on a multidisciplinary level, strategies to prevent and reduce both obesity and dental caries at an early age.

  • 22. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Isaksson, Helen
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Koch, Göran
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    BMI status in Swedish children and young adults in relation to caries prevalence: BMI and caries prevalence2011In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight and obesity are increasing as health problems at global level. Dental caries and obesity are both multifactorial diseases and are associated with dietary habits. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between body weight status and caries prevalence in an unselected population followed from pre-school years to young adulthood. The present investigation was designed as a longitudinal analysis of the association between overweight/obesity and dental caries in one population at 3, 6, 15 and 20 years of age. The result shows that adolescents (15 years) and young adults (20 years) who are overweight/obese had a statistically significantly higher caries prevalence than normal-weight young people. At 6 years of age, the odds (OR) of having caries among obese children are 2.5 times higher than the odds for caries among six-year-old children of normal weight (p = 0.04). At 3 years of age, no association between overweight/obesity and caries was found. To conclude, overweight and obese adolescents and young adults had more caries than normal-weight individuals. The present study emphasises the need for multidisciplinary approaches to change the lifestyle factors causing both overweight/obesity and dental caries.

  • 23. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Dental treatment in the primary dentition of 7-12 year-old Swedish schoolchildren.2003In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Dental treatment of the primary dentition in 7-12 year-old Swedish children in relation to caries experience at 6 years of age.2004In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Oral hygiene and parent-related factors during early childhood in relation to approximal caries at 15 years of age2008In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping.
    Att möta våldsutsatta äldre personer2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] L. Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 183-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten.
    Östlund, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ansvarsområden för olika samhällsfunktioner2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] L. Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 91-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Alsabel, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Hur bestämningsfaktorn socioekonomi påverkar oralhälsorelaterat beteende hos vuxna: En litteraturöversikt2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are several determinants that can affect an individual's self-care and dental visits. Socioeconomics is an important determinant for the oral health. Socioeconomic factors such as education level, culture, income and living habits have an impact. Several oral diseases are the result of these factors.

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate how socioeconomic determinants affect oral health-related behavior in adults.

    Method: A literature review was implemented where scientific articles were searched in databases DOSS and MEDLINE. Using a modified review template, the articles were reviewed and analyzed to assess if the quality of the articles were medium or high according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Lastly, 10 articles were included for this study.

    Results: The result examines how socioeconomic factors affect oral health-related behavior of self-care habits and dental visits. Socio-economic factors have been shown to influence this. Less good self-care habits have shown an association with lower socioeconomic status. Individuals with lower socioeconomic status visited dental care mainly in urgent cases. 

    Conclusion: The majority of the included articles have shown a link between socioeconomics and self-care habits as well as dental visits. Further research in this area is needed to investigate the association more closely.

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  • 29.
    Anastassaki, Alkisti
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Patients referred to a specialist clinic because of suspected temporomandibular disorders: a survey of 3194 patients in respect of diagnoses, treatments, and treatment outcome.2004In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims were to study the patient population at a temporomandibular disorders (TMD) specialist clinic over time, and to try to find variables of importance for treatment outcome. The material consisted of 3194 consecutive patients who were referred to the clinic and underwent a clinical examination during the period 1995-2002. A number of patient and treatment-related variables that had been collected in an electronic database were analyzed retrospectively. The age and sex distribution of the present patient material was in line with several previous investigations of TMD patients. The mean age of both men and women was 42 years, and there was a large preponderance of women. A vast majority of the patients responded positively, and in few visits, on traditional conservative treatment methods. In line with previous studies, no strong predictors for treatment outcome were found. However, the diagnoses of disk displacement without reduction, arthritis in TMJs, and myalgia in masticatory muscles were predictors for a significant improvement, while the diagnosis orofacial pain of unspecified origin predicted a poorer prognosis.

  • 30.
    Anastassaki, Alkisti
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Öster, Anders
    Helkimo, Martti
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Globus pharyngeus: Litteraturöversikt och jämförande studie av två patientgrupper1996In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 88, no 7, p. 404-409Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Anastassaki Köhler, Alkisti
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Clinical signs indicative of temporomandibular disorders in adults: time trends and associated factors2013In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to examine possible time trends in the prevalence of clinical signs indicative of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in an adult population, to analyse possible associations between TMD signs and associated factors and to estimate the need for TMD treatment. Three independent, stratified and randomly selected samples of around 100 individuals in the age groups of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years participated in the Jönköping studies in 1983,1993 and 2003. The study material consisted of 1,693 subjects who, after answering a questionnaire and being interviewed about the presence of TMD symptoms, were clinically examined in terms of the presence of TMD signs according to the Clinical Dysfunction Index (Di) by Helkimo. Associations between clinical signs and the Di as dependent variables and each of the independent variables of age group, gender, reported bruxism, trauma, self-perceived healthiness and the year of investigation were analysed in binary logistic regression models. Estimates of the need for TMD treatment were based on the presence of a combination of severe symptoms and clinical signs. The prevalence of severely impaired jaw movement capacity, relating to horizontal movements, had increased in 2003. The prevalence of muscle pain and temporomandibular joint pain upon posterior palpation was found to vary statistically significantly between 1993 and 2003. Gender differences were noted in these changes overtime. Female gender, advancing age, awareness of bruxism, self-perceived health impairment and the wearing of complete dentures were associated with TMD signs and a higher degree of clinical dysfunction. The estimated need for TMD treatment increased from 5% in 1983 to 8% in 2003 and was higher in women than in men. In conclusion, the results indicate that the prevalence of some TMD signs and of estimated treatment need increased during the period 1983-2003.

  • 32.
    Anastassaki Köhler, Alkisti
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Prevalence of symptoms indicative of temporomandibular disorders in adults: cross-sectional epidemiological investigations covering two decades2012In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aims were (1) to study possible secular trends in the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms in adults and (2) to analyse possible associations between TMD symptoms and background factors. Materials and methods. The investigation has a repeated cross-sectional design. Three independent, randomly selected samples of 100 individuals in the age groups of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years, a total of 1704 subjects, participated in the Jönköping studies in 1983, 1993 and 2003. All the subjects were evaluated using a questionnaire and a structured interview relating to the presence of TMD symptoms. Associations between symptoms and the Anamnestic Dysfunction Index (Ai) as dependent variables and each of the independent variables, age group, gender, reported bruxism, trauma (1983), self-perceived health impairment and the year of investigation were analysed in binary logistic regression models. Results. The prevalence of the separate symptoms, apart from for TMJ clicking, did not vary to any statistically significant degree between the different examination years. However, the prevalence of recurrent headache in 20-year-old subjects rose remarkably in 2003 and an increase in the Ai I and Ai II for the whole population was observed during the 20-year period. Reported bruxism, which increased during the study period, and self-perceived health impairment were associated with most of the TMD symptoms and the Ai. Conclusions. An increase in the prevalence of TMD symptoms expressed as Anamnestic Dysfunction Index I and II has been noted over a 20-year period.

  • 33.
    Anastassaki Köhler, Alkisti
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Nydell Helkimo, Anna
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Prevalence of symptoms and signs indicative of temporomandibular disorders in children and adolescents: A cross-sectional epidemiological investigation covering two decades2009In: European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1818-6300, Vol. 10, no Suppl. 1, p. 16-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: These were to 1) estimate the prevalence of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, 2) follow possible variations in TMD signs and symptoms over a 20-year period, and 3) study possible associations between TMD symptoms and signs and factors of interest. DESIGN: About 100 individuals in the age groups of 3, 5, 10 and 15 years participated in crosssectional stratified epidemiological investigations in 1983, 1993 and 2003. METHODS: All participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire including questions on general and oral health, dental care habits and some sociodemographic issues. More specific questions recorded the presence or absence of subjective symptoms: tiredness in the jaws on awakening or during chewing; clicking sounds or crepitations from the temporomandibular joints (TMJs); locking/ catching of the mandible; luxation of the mandible; reduced jaw movement capacity; pain during jaw movements; other pain conditions in the jaws or in the TMJ regions. Subjects were examined clinically at each time period for; jaw mobility (maximum jaw opening including vertical overbite, maximum laterotrusion to the right and to the left, maximum protrusion); TMJ function (normal function, deflection on jaw opening of > 2 mm, TMJ clicking or crepitations, TMJ locking, TMJ luxation); pain on jaw movement (no pain on movements, pain on one movement, pain on more than one movement); muscle pain (no muscle pain, pain on palpation in 1-3 sites, pain on palpation in > 3 sites); TMJ pain (no joint pain, pain on lateral palpation of one or both joints, pain on posterior palpation of one or both joints). No functional examination of the masticatory system was performed in children aged 3 and 5 years. RESULTS: TMD-related symptoms were very rare in 3- and 5-year-olds. In the age groups of 10- and 15-yearolds, 5-9% of the participants reported more severe symptoms, up to 50% showed one or more TMD signs, while it was estimated that 1-2% were in need of TMD treatment. Several symptoms and signs increased with age. No gender differences, with the exception of recurrent headache, were noted. Oral parafunctions were reported by 11-47%. Apart from a few variables, no statistically significant changes in the prevalence of TMD symptoms and signs were observed over the 20-year period. Clenching/grinding of teeth and general health factors were found to be associated with TMD symptoms and signs. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of more severe TMD symptoms and signs in children and adolescents was generally low in all three examinations and did not change significantly during the 20-year period. Increasing age, general health factors and oral parafunctions were associated with TMD symptoms and signs in 10- and 15-year-olds.

  • 34.
    Anastassaki-Köhler, A
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Hugoson, A
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Clinical signs indicative of temporomandibular disorders in adults: changes over time and associated factors – a preliminary report.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Anastassaki-Köhler, Alkisti
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    On temporomandibular disorders: Time trends, associated factors, treatment need and treatment outcome2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few decades, and especially during the 1990s, an increase in musculoskeletal pain conditions and stress-related ill-health has been observed in Sweden. At the same time, an improvement in the oral health of the population has been noted. The overall aim of this thesis was to acquire knowledge relating to possible time trends for the presence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the population. A further objective was to study factors that possibly influence the presence of these disorders and the outcome of their treatment.

    Studies I–III are based on a series of repeated cross-sectional population-based investigations. Three independent samples of 130 individuals in the age groups of 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years were randomly selected from the inhabitants of the city of Jonkoping, Sweden in 1983, 1993 and 2003. The total participation rate was 21%, 22% and 29% respectively. The participants were examined using a questionnaire, interview and a clinical examination of the stomatognathic system regarding the presence of symptoms and signs indicative of TMD. Study IV is a retrospective survey of a clinical sample of patients referred to and treated at the Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jonkoping, in 1995–2002. The overall frequencies of symptoms and the rates for some clinical signs and consequently of an estimated treatment need in adults increased during the study period. In 2003, the prevalence of frequent headache in 20-year-olds, mainly females, had markedly increased. The reports of bruxism among adults increased from 1983 to 2003. Awareness of bruxism and self-perceived health impairment were associated with TMD symptoms and signs. A favourable treatment outcome was observed for the majority of patients with common TMD sub-diagnoses and no strong predictors of treatment outcome were found.

    In conclusion, the results suggest some time trends towards an increased prevalence in the overall symptoms and some signs indicative of TMD in the Swedish adult population during the time period 1983–2003. A profound understanding of the social determinants of health is recommended when planning public health resources.

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  • 36.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Scientific Affairs Group, Swedish Match AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Cigarette smoking affects microRNAs and inflammatory biomarkers in healthy individuals and an association to single nucleotide polymorphisms is indicated2019In: Biomarkers, ISSN 1354-750X, E-ISSN 1366-5804, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 180-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke induces inflammation and remodels immune response. Genetic and epigenetic alterations might be involved in the pathogenesis of smoking related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of smoking on systemic inflammation biomarkers and epigenetic changes at microRNA (miRNA) expression level. We also examined if the levels of inflammatory biomarkers were associated with selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

    METHOD: From 39 smokers and 101 non-smokers, levels of total white blood cells (WBCs) and its subpopulations, plasma cytokines/chemokines/proteins and miRNAs were analysed. For three biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP), MCP-1 and IFN-γ that were affected by smoking, the influence of SNPs was analyzed.

    RESULT: Elevated levels of total WBCs, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, CRP, MCP-1, IFN-γ and lower levels of miR-21 were detected in smokers. The elevated levels of IFN-γ in smokers was only statistically significantly associated with rs2069705 AG/GG SNP-genotype.

    CONCLUSIONS: A lower level of oncomir miRNA-21 and a higher level of immune modelling cytokine IFN-γ detected in smokers could be a protective immune response to cigarette smoke. The higher level of IFN-γ in smokers with a specific SNP genotype also suggests that a genetic interaction with smoking might predict the pathobiology of smoking related disease.

  • 37.
    Andersson, Clara
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Behandlingsmetoders effekt på hyposalivation och oral mukosit efter behandling av huvud- och halscancer: - En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Huvud- och halscancerbehandling genom strålbehandling/kirurgi kan bidra till olika orala biverkningar. De vanligaste biverkningarna som uppstår under/efter behandling är hyposalivation och oral mukosit. Syfte: Syftet med litteraturöversikten var att sammanställa olika behandlingsmetoders effekt på hyposalivation och oral mukosit efter behandling av huvud- och halscancer. Metod: Studiedesignen var en allmän litteraturöversikt där databaserna Medline, DOSS och Cinahl användes för att finna relevanta vetenskapliga artiklar. Genom inklusions-/exklusionskriterier valdes 15 vetenskapliga artiklar ut. De inkluderade studierna granskades utifrån en modifierad granskningsmall för att enbart studier med starkt/måttligt bevisvärde skulle presenteras. Resultat: Resultatet framställer att Pilokarpin, Cevimelin och TENS visade en positiv effekt på hyposalivation. Salivsubstitut och akupunktur visade inte någon inverkan på salivsekretionen utan påverkade enbart xerostomi positivt. Laserterapi redovisades ha effekt mot mukosit där allvarlighetsgraden av mukosit var lägre hos lasergrupperna i jämförelse med placebogrupperna. Honung kan ha en effekt att lindra mukosit och Aloe Vera visade ingen effekt mot mukosit eller andra biverkningar kopplade till mukosituppkomsten. Slutsats: Pilokarpin, Cevimelin och TENS kan bidra till ökad salivsekretion. Laserterapi och honung kan ha effekt mot oral mukosit. Behandlingar som Aloe Vera, akupunktur och salivsubstitut uppvisade inte någon effekt i resultatet. Fortsatt forskning behövs för att utveckla behandlingsmetoders effekt mot mukosit och hyposalivation.

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  • 38.
    Angarita-Diaz, Maria P.
    et al.
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Simon-Soro, Aurea
    Fdn Promot Hlth & Biomed Res, Dept Hlth & Genom, Valencia, Spain..
    Forero, Diana
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Balcazar, Felipe
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Sarmiento, Luisa
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Romero, Erika
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Health and Genomics, Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research, Valencia, Spain.
    Evaluation of possible biomarkers for caries risk in children 6 to 12 years of age2021In: Journal of Oral Microbiology, ISSN 2000-2297, E-ISSN 2000-2297, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1956219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electrolytes, proteins, and other salivary molecules play an important role in tooth integrity and can serve as biomarkers associated with caries.

    Objective: To determine the concentration of potential biomarkers in children without caries (CF) and children with caries (CA).

    Methods: Unstimulated saliva was collected, and the biomarkers quantified in duplicate, using commercial Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kits to determine IgA, fibronectin, cathelicidin LL-37, and statherin levels, as well as colorimetric tests to detect formate and phosphate.

    Results: Significantly higher concentrations of statherin was detected in the CF group (Median: 94,734.6; IQR: 92,934.6-95,113.7) compared to the CA2 group (90,875.0; IQR: 83,580.2-94,633.4) (p = 0.03). Slightly higher median IgA (48,250.0; IQR: 31,461.9-67,418.8) and LL-37 levels (56.1; IQR 43.6-116.2) and a lower concentration of formate were detected in the CF group (0.02; IQR 0.0034-0.15) compared to the group with caries (IgA: 37,776.42; IQR: 33,383.9-44,128.5; LL-37: 46.3; IQR: 40.1011-67.7; formate: 0.10; IQR: 0.01-0.18), but these differences were not statistically significant.

    Conclusion: The fact that these compounds have been identified as good markers for caries among European adults highlights the difficulty of identifying universal biomarkers that are applicable to all ages or to different populations.

  • 39.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Crown Princess Victoria’s Child and Youth Hospital, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Community Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Measuring hair cortisol concentration, insomnia symptoms and quality of life in preschool children with severe early childhood caries–a case-control pilot study2023In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 81, no 7, p. 508-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to 1) investigate the relationships between hair cortisol concentration (HCC), insomnia symptoms, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in preschool children with severe early childhood caries, 2) compare HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL in preschool children with severe early childhood caries with these factors in children without clinical signs of dental caries, and 3) explore correlations between caries scores and HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL.

    Material and Methods: A case-control pilot study, including 12 children with severe early childhood caries and 28 controls, aged 3-5 years. Dental examination was performed and hair samples for cortisol were taken. Parents filled out questionnaires about their child’s insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL. Interpreters were used in families with language difficulties.

    Results: The key findings in this pilot study were tendencies that children with severe early childhood caries had more insomnia symptoms, and poorer OHRQoL than the controls. Caries scores was correlated with insomnia symptoms and OHRQoL.

    Conclusions: Dentists should include questions about the child’s sleep when they see the child, as insomnia related to dental caries may lead to several physical, mental, and social problems.

  • 40.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Crown Princess Victoria's Child and Youth Hospital, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Swedish translation and validation of the Pediatric Insomnia Severity Index2020In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To increase health and well-being in young children, it is important to acknowledge and promote the child's sleep behaviour. However, there is a lack of brief, validated sleep screening instruments for children. The aims of the study were to (1) present a Swedish translation of the PISI, (2) examine the factor structure of the Swedish version of PISI, and test the reliability and validity of the PISI factor structure in a sample of healthy children in Sweden.

    Methods: The English version of the PISI was translated into Swedish, translated back into English, and agreed upon before use. Parents of healthy 3- to 10-year-old children filled out the Swedish version of the PISI and the generic health-related quality of life instrument KIDSCREEN-27 two times. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for baseline and test-retest, structural equation modelling, and correlations between the PISI and KIDSCREEN-27 were performed.

    Results: In total, 160 parents filled out baseline questionnaires (test), whereof 100 parents (63%) filled out the follow-up questionnaires (retest). Confirmative factor analysis of the PISI found two correlated factors: sleep onset problems (SOP) and sleep maintenance problems (SMP). The PISI had substantial construct and test-retest reliability. The PISI factors were related to all KIDSCREEN-27 dimensions.

    Conclusions: The Swedish version of the PISI is applicable for screening sleep problems and is a useful aid in dialogues with families about sleep. 

  • 41. Arnrup, Kristina
    et al.
    Berggren, Ulf
    Broberg, Anders G
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Attitudes to dental care among parents of uncooperative vs. cooperative child dental patients.2002In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 75-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Backlund, Caroline
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Gunnarsson, Cajsa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Knowlegde, attitude and behavior regarding oral health among children and adolescents, in Vietnam and Sweden: A literature review2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Vietnam, being a developing country does not have the same economic means to put into dental care as a country like Sweden. Knowledge, attitude and behavior are determining factors for oral health. The AIM of this literature study´s was therefore to evaluate knowledge, attitude and behavior regarding oral health among children and adolescents, in Vietnam and Sweden. METHOD:A literature review was made using the databases DOSS, MEDLINE and CINAHL. Twelve articles were included for the review. RESULTS: Bleeding gum was known, by one-third of the Vietnamese children and adolescents, to be a clinical sign of gingivitis. In Sweden the knowledge varied between 75-83%. In both Vietnam and Sweden, shiny and white teeth were mentioned to be important. The frequency of toothbrushing twice a day or more was reported from 40% to 68% among the participants in Vietnam. In Sweden, it varied from 73% to 82%. The highest percentage of children who consumed sweets daily or more frequent was 59,7% in Vietnam respectively 2-6% in Sweden. CONCLUSION: Knowledge about oral health was lacking and behavior could be seen to be inadequate. The attitude towards oral health is more focused on appearance than on the aspect of health.

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  • 43. Baelum, V
    et al.
    van Palenstein Helderman, W
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Yee, R
    Fejerskov, O
    A global perspective on changes in the burden of caries and periodontitis: implications for dentistry.2007In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 872-906; discussion 940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure and contents of most oral health care systems and the contents of dental curricula reflect a deep-rooted tradition for attempting to cure oral diseases by refined technological means. However, better oral health conditions for the world's populations necessitate the application of up-to-date scientific knowledge to control the major oral diseases. This review points out that not only should the structure and contents of oral health care delivery systems be based on state-of-the-art knowledge about the biology of the oral diseases; they must also take into account the trends for change in caries and periodontal diseases within and between populations, and acknowledge the impact of changes in treatment philosophies for these trends. The oral disease profiles for populations in low- and high-income countries are briefly described, and it is concluded that the rapidly changing disease profiles observed in high-income countries necessitate re-thinking of the future role and organization of dentistry in such countries. The priorities for low- and middle-income countries must be to avoid repeating the mistakes made in the high-income countries. Instead, these societies might take advantage of setting priorities based on a population-based common risk factor approach. If such an approach is adopted, the training of personnel with oral health care competence must be rethought. The authors suggest three different cadres of dental care providers to be considered for an approach that allows health care planners in different populations around the world to prioritize appropriate oral health care with due respect for the socio-economic conditions prevailing.

  • 44.
    Bafadhl, Abdurahman
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Gashi, Berat
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Oral hälsa hos prematurt födda barn2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the literature study was to study the occurrence of dental hypomineralization (MIH), plaque and caries in prematurely born children in the primary and permanent dentition. Method: The study was a literature study. Four databases were used, MEDLINE, DOSS, CINAHL and PubMed, to find relevant articles for the study. A total of 14 articles were included according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Two out of four studies showed that prematurely born children have an increased risk for MIH-affected teeth than full-term children. In common, the findings from the studies showed a higher amount of plaque was found in preterm children compared to control groups. The majority of the studies did not find a statistically significant difference between premature children and full-term children in dental caries prevalence. Conclusion: Premature birth can lead to higher incidence of plaque and dental hypomineralization. A higher incidence of caries in preterm children could not be established.  Increased knowledge of these complications is important for being able to treat prematurely born children in a professional manner. More research is needed on the relationship between prematurely born children and caries.

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  • 45.
    Bankvall, M.
    et al.
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Carda-Diéguez, M.
    Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Foundation, Valencia, Spain.
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Karlsson, A.
    Nanoxis Consulting AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hasséus, B.
    Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, R.
    Clinical microbiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Robledo-Sierra, J.
    Faculty of Dentistry, CES University, Medellin, Colombia.
    Metataxonomic and metaproteomic profiling of the oral microbiome in oral lichen planus: a pilot study2023In: Journal of Oral Microbiology, ISSN 2000-2297, E-ISSN 2000-2297, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 2161726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A growing body of evidence demonstrates a different bacterial composition in the oral cavity of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP).

    Patients and methods: Buccal swab samples were collected from affected and non-affected sites of six patients with reticular OLP and the healthy oral mucosa of six control subjects. 16S rRNA gene MiSeq sequencing and mass spectrometry-based proteomics were utilised to identify the metataxonomic and metaproteomic profiles of the oral microbiome in both groups.

    Results: From the metataxonomic analysis, the most abundant species in the three subgroups were Streptococcus oralis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, accounting for up to 70% of the total population. Principal Coordinates Analysis showed differential clustering of samples from the healthy and OLP groups. ANCOM-BC compositional analysis revealed multiple species (including P. aeruginosa and several species of Veillonella, Prevotella, Streptococcus and Neisseria) significantly over-represented in the control group and several (including Granulicatella elegans, Gemella haemolysans and G. parahaemolysans) in patients with OLP. The metaproteomic data were generally congruent and revealed that several Gemella haemolysans-belonging peptidases and other proteins with inflammatory and virulence potential were present in OLP lesions.

    Conclusion: Our data suggest that several bacterial species are associated with OLP. Future studies with larger cohorts should be conducted to determine their role in the aetiology of OLP and evaluate their potential as disease biomarkers.

  • 46.
    Barnardo, Josefin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Ingvarsson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Massmedias påverkan på unga vuxnas attityd och val kring oral hälsa2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to explore the influence of television and internet regarding the view of, interest in and oral health choices among young adults at Jönköping University. Method: A questionnaire were distributed to 100 young adults at Jönköping University in the ages of 20-30 years. Of these, 66 were women, 33 men and 1 with different gender identity. The questionnaire concerned time consuming of television and internet and the extent to which these media influence the view of and interest in oral health. The questions also addressed what oral health information respondents found most interesting, and the extent to which television and internet are perceived as credible and affect the individual's oral health choices. Result: The study indicated that whole and clean teeth were the most interesting oral health information. Some impact could be seen regarding view of, interest in, and choices regarding oral health. There was no difference between television and internet concerning the impact, without significant difference between men and women. No connection was found regarding respondents’ views of oral health and consumption of these media. Conclusion: Television and internet had some impact on the respondents regarding their views of, interest in and choices regarding oral health.

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  • 47.
    Bengtsson, Sandra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. 830328-3983.
    Föräldrars attityder till faktorer associerade med karies hos 6- åriga barn2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: År 2018 publicerade Socialstyrelsen ny data som visar på en minskning av barn som är kariesfria i åldersgruppen sex år i Sverige (Sos, 2018).  Även i SkaPa, Svenskt kvalitetsregister för karies och parodontit, ses en markant ökning av karies bland barn i åldrarna sex, sju och åtta år. Syfte: Syftet med studien var att utforska föräldrars attityder kring olika faktorer som anses vara avgörande för uppkomst av karies hos barn i 6-årsåldern. Metod: Kvalitativ intervjustudie genom innehållsanalys. Resultat: I resultatet framkom tre huvudkategorier, Attityd utifrån välbefinnande, Attityd utifrån kunskap och Attityd utifrån ansvar. I de olika kategorierna framkommer attityder som alla på ett eller annat sätt berör ämnena kost, munhygien och fluorid. Kategorierna kompletterar varandra samtidigt som de berör olika problemområden. Konklusion: Brist i kunskap ses i ämnet munhygien där föräldrarna anser att tandborstning är den enskilt viktigaste faktorn för att undvika karies.  Brist i information ses gällande sockerkonsumtion där föräldrarna har en avslappnad attityd mot socker som gör det acceptabelt med socker som en naturlig del i vardagen. Denna studie bidrar till att uppnå WHO:s mål, på grund av att tandvårdspersonal blir medvetna av informationens betydelse till föräldrar som har barn i sex års åldern.

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  • 48.
    Berbic, Jasmina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Omeirat, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tandhygienisters användning av bildstöd vid möte med barnpatienter2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of pictorial support among dental hygienists when meeting children in a dental environment. Method and material: A digital questionnaire with 15 questions was send out to all (102) actively working dental hygienists in the county of Jönköping. There were a total of 57 participants, 54 women and 3 men who answered the questionnaire. Results were presented with absolute and relative frequencies, mean value and Chi-square test. Results: There was an interest in using pictorial support among dental hygienists. All dental hygienists in special dental care used pictorial support. Among dental hygienists in public dental care 23.5% used pictorial support. Results showed that the majority of dental hygienists preferred using pictorial support on all children. There was no statistically significant difference between using pictorial support and the length of dental hygienist education, but participants who finished a three-year education used pictorial support more often. Conclusion: Pictorial support has found to be a useful tool in dental care, still there are dental hygienists that don’t use it. More knowledge and research are needed about pictorial support so the effect of augmentative and alternative communication can be evaluated.

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  • 49. Bergendal, T
    et al.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Kvint, S
    Lundgren, D
    A radiological inventory of possible sites for cylinder implants in edentulous regions of the jaws: An epidemiological study1994In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 75-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implant treatment is nowadays requested as an alternative mode of treatment for both total and partial edentulousness. The purpose of the study was to assess the maximum number of possible implant sites in a group of adults. The study material comprised 579 persons divided into the age-groups 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years. Based on radiological examination, the subjects were grouped according to Eichner's index. They comprised both dentate and edentulous individuals. Templates, marked with cylinder implants of different dimensions, were placed over edentulous regions. The possible number of cylinder-shaped endosseous implants that could be placed anterior to the second molar was assessed in relation to bone availability and anatomical structures. Gaps treated with fixed bridges were not registered. Altogether 1,048 presumptive fixture sites were marked, of which 78% in the age-groups 60 and 70 years. Eichner groups C 1-3, which comprised the edentulous persons, constituted 12% of the subjects and accounted for 57% of the possible number of implants. All edentulous mandibles and 70% of the edentulous maxillae were judged suitable for placement of implants. On average 5.5 and 5.8 sites were marked per edentulous maxilla and mandible, respectively. Groups B1-4 comprised 21% of the subjects and accounted for 37% of the implants. It is discussed that implant treatment in totally edentulous jaws will increase in relative terms in Sweden as in other Scandinavian countries, i.e. the percentage of edentulous jaws treated with implants will increase. In absolute terms, however, the treatment will probably decrease owing to a marked decrease in the number of edentulous individuals. The future need for implant treatment in the residual dentition will probably increase but it is difficult to predict by how much.

  • 50. Bergendal, T
    et al.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Changes in signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders following treatment with implant-supported fixed prostheses: a prospective 3-year follow up.2000In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 392-398Article in journal (Refereed)
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