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  • 1. Adair, B
    et al.
    Ullenhag, A.
    Rosenbaum, P.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Keen, D.
    Imms, C.
    A systematic review of measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and of their alignment with the family of Participation-Related ConstructsIn: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1093-1104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities.

    Method

    Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated.

    Results

    Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes.

    Intepretation

    Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Applying the ICF-CY to identify children's everyday life situations: A step towards participation-focused code sets2013In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the long-term goal to create a screening tool with code sets for children’s everyday life situations (ELS), the purpose of the present study was to identify ELS for children and youth aged 0-17 years. The views of professionals and parents in Sweden, South Africa, and US were integrated based on linkages to ICF-CY. The chapters Self-care and Major life areas seemed most obvious include ELS. At 2nd ICF-CY level, eleven categories emerged as ELS with Hygiene (d510-d530) and Recreation and leisure (d920) as the most obvious. Two sets of ELS were identified for infants/preschoolers and school aged children/adolescents. Professionals and parents agreed on ELS for the older age-group. Findings suggested that ELS differ in context specificity depending on maturity and growing autonomy. The study have implications for the future tool intending to support children with disabilities in describing what matters most for them in intervention planning.

  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Applying the ICF-CY to identify everyday life situations of children and youth with disabilities2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Four studies were included in this doctoral dissertation aiming to investigatehow habilitation professionals perceive the ICF-CY in clinical work and to identify everyday life situations specific for children and youth aged 0-17 years. The ICF-CY was the conceptual framework and since the research was conducted on as well as with the ICF-CY, the use of the classification runs like a thread through all the work. The design was primarily qualitative and included descriptive and comparative content analyses. Study I was longitudinal, aiming to explore how an implementation of the ICF-CY in Swedish habilitation services was perceived. Studies II-IV were interrelated, aiming to explore children’s most common everyday life situations. Content in measures of participation, professionals’ perspectives, and external data on parents’ perspectives were linked to the ICF-CY and compared. Mixed methods design bridged the Studies III-IV.

    Results in Study I indicated that knowledge on the ICF-CY enhanced professionals’ awareness of families’ views of child functioning and pointed to the need for ICF-CY based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation in life situations. A first important issue in this respect was to identify everyday life situations. Two sets of ten everyday life situations related to the ICF-CY component Activities and Participation, chapters d3-d9, were compiled and adopted for younger and older children respectively, establishing a difference in context specificity depending on maturity and growing autonomy. Furthermore, key constructs in the ICFCY model were discussed, additional ICF-CY linking rules were presented and suggestions for revisions of the ICF linking rules and the ICF-CY were listed. As the sample of everyday life situations reflects the perspectives of adults, further research has to add the perspective of children and youth. The identified everyday life situations will be the basis for the development of code sets included in a screening tool intended for self- or proxy- report of participation from early childhood through adolescence.

  • 5.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Att identifiera sin egen situation2011In: Handbok i att använda ICF och ICF-CY / [ed] Mia Pless, Mats Granlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, p. 151-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Att utvärdera en behandling2011In: Handbok i att använda ICF och ICF-CY / [ed] Mia Pless & Mats Granlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, p. 157-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Att öka delaktigheten för barn och ungdomar med funktionsnedsättning. ICF-CY’s användbarhet för kartläggning av vardagsfungerande2011In: / [ed] Bengt Westerberg, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF-CY in habilitation services for children2018In: An Emerging Approach for Education and Care: implementing a Worldwide Classification of Functioning and Disability / [ed] Susana Castro and Olympia Palikara, Routledge, 2018, p. 187-203Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF-CY lupp på vardagssituationer2009In: Kvalitetsdagar för Svensk Barn- och ungdomshabilitering: Växjö, maj 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF-CY to understand everyday life situations for children and youth. Assessments instruments for collaborative problem solving in child- and youth habilitation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Identification of ICF-CY categories for participation focused code sets for pre-schoolers: A Delphi process2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Identifying children´s everyday life situations using an ICF-CY perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with disabilities and their parents need opportunities to express opinions and take part of professional knowledge during habilitation processes. However, there is no structured model to identify child participation in everyday life situations (EDLS). Code sets based on WHO International Classification of Functioning, disability and health, Child and Youth version, ICF-CY, would support  such dialogues. Interventions for children with disabilities have in the last decades shifted from focusing on the child to the child in specific EDLS. Integration of professionals’ and parents´ views of EDLS for children provides a common knowledge on conditions important for everyday functioning. Shared views might be a ‘door opener’ for collaboration during intervention planning for children with disabilities. A focus on EDLS make the partners focus on participation, share understanding of children’s individual preferences, and motivate them for interventions.

    The study identified parents’ and professionals’ picture of EDLS to be considered in intervention planning. With the long-term goal to create code sets for children’s EDLS, the purpose was to determine a set of EDLS for children and youth aged 0-17 years. A triangulation of data collected with various sampling strategies and participants was conducted, integrating the views of professionals and parents in Sweden, South Africa, and the US. Data were compared after linkage to ICF-CY codes in the component Activities and Participation. Analyses pointed out Self-care and Major life areas as the two most important chapters and  depicted eleven categories as EDLS with Hygiene and Recreation and leisure as the most frequent. Two final sets of ICF-CY categories were identified as EDLS for infants/preschoolers and school aged children/adolescents. The sets differed slightly between younger children (0-6 yrs) and older (7-17 yrs), reflecting how EDLS might differ in context specificity depending on maturity and growing autonomy. Professionals and parents agreed on everyday life situations for older children but not for younger. The results of the study have implications for the future development of a screening tool containing code sets from early childhood through adolescence concerning children’s desires and opportunities to participate in EDLS. To obtain a picture as complete as possible, children and youth representing the two age groups should be involved in the future process of developing a screening tool.

  • 13.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The development of social strengths in children with cerebral palsy2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Vad barn med funktionsnedsättningar behöver berätta för habiliterare2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Habiliterare identifierar oftast barns svårigheter med yrkesspecifika metoder, vilket ger en risk att barnen utsätts för överlappande tester och för åtgärder som de inte förstår meningen med. För att barnen ska kunna  uppleva träning meningsfull måste de ges möjlighet att uttrycka sina behov av ökad delaktighet i vardagssituationer. Habiliteringspersonal vet då vad som inledningsvis är viktigt och motiverande för barnen själva för att planera åtgärder, men det har saknats tvärvetenskapliga instrument för detta.

    Eftersom ICF-CY bedömts användbart som gemensamt ramverk för habiliteringsteam, främst för kartläggning och habiliteringsplanering, är det långsiktiga målet för projektet ett ICF-CY baserat instrument med kortare frågeformulär fokuserade på delaktighet i vardagen. Inom ramen för ett avhandlingsarbete har barns viktigaste vardagssituationer identifierats genom litteraturstudier, frågeformulär med personal och integrering av föräldradata från externa studier. I ett pilotprojekt med Delphiprocess har föräldrar och personal identifierat innehåll i tre formulär för förskolebarn: sömn, måltider och lek.

    Resultatet har visat, att instrumentet behöver innehålla två uppsättningar frågeformulär baserade på 10 delvis olika vardagssituationer för vardera förskolebarn (0-6 år) och skolbarn/tonåringar (7-17 år). Fokus låg på milstolpar i barns utveckling för yngre och på sociala aktiviteter för äldre barn. Föräldrar framhöll hushållsgöromål och socialt liv i högre grad än de professionella.  När det gällde innehåll i formulär fokuserade föräldrar i högre utsträckning på barns kroppsfunktioner och personal mera på omgivningsfaktorer.

    Fortsatt arbete planeras. Barn måste själva få uttrycka vilka vardagssituationer som är viktigast, bestämma rubriker som speglar deras uppfattning om det som förekommer i vardagen och diskutera innehåll i formulären.

  • 15.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    WHO:s Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in Child- and Youth Habilitation2007In: Good practice in rehabilitation of children and young - in practise 2007-2011: Helsingfors, November 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, M
    ICF-CY based forms for use in problem-solving for children with disabilities2007In: The 10 years anniversary research conference of Nordic Network on Disability Research (NNDR, Göteborg, Sweden, 10-12th May, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, M
    ICF-CY based forms for use in problem-solving for children with disabilities2007In: 7th International Scientific Conference Research in Education an Rehabilitation Sciences: Zagreb, June 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lim, Chih Ing
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
    ICF-CY based code sets focusing on participation for pre-schoolers2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with disabilities and their parents need opportunities to express opinions and take part of professional knowledge during habilitation processes. However, there is no structured model to identify and assess child participation in everyday life situations (EDLS). ICF-CY based code sets focusing on participation would support  dialogues about what matters most for individual children, causes of failures,  and needs of interventions. This study constituted a trial identifying content in code sets for Sleeping, Mealtimes, and Play.

    EDLS specific for children and youth was initially identified by integration of data from measures of participation, professional opinions, and parents’ perspectives. Linkage to the ICF-CY, using existing and additional linking rules, provided comparable data, resulting in two sets of ten EDLS. These were related to the Activities and Participation component, chapters 3-9, and adapted for younger and older children.

    ICF-CY categories relevant for children aged 0-6 years to be included in code sets for three of the EDLS were identified by a sequential Delphi process in 3 rounds. Participants were 5 interdisciplinary habilitation teams, altogether 35 professionals, and 7 parents of 13 typical developed preschool children from 6 families. There were no significant correlation between professionals and parents. Their partly different ICF-CY categories suggested high professional focus on Environmental factors compared with  high parental focus on Body functions. Integration of data revealed 12 categories appropriate for Sleeping, 21 for Mealtimes, and 30 for Play. This highlights the importance to integrate opinions and adapt content in code sets to individual EDLS.

  • 19.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lim, Chih-Ing
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA..
    Code sets for everyday life situations of children aged 0-6: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play - a study based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth2013In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fi]

    Introduction: The complexity of the Child and Youth version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, the ICF-CY, is a challenge for occupational therapists and other professionals in clinical work. Code sets including only essential categories help to make it more user-friendly. Thus far, code sets have been developed to reflect functioning for children in different developmental periods. However, there are no code sets that support screening of participation in everyday life situations and can be used across diagnoses. This exploratory study is the first attempt to develop code sets for preschoolers’ (age 0-6 years) everyday life situations.

    Method: Using sequential Delphi processes with expert panels consisting of 35 professionals in five interdisciplinary early intervention teams and six parents of children, the study identified content in three code sets: Sleeping, Mealtimes and Play.

    Results: A limited number of relevant categories were identified for three code sets: Sleeping (12), Mealtimes (21) and Play (30). Findings suggested a professional focus on Environmental factors compared with a parental focus on Body functions.

    Conclusion: It is important to consider the opinions of all involved when developing code sets to provide a common framework for screening of children’s everyday functioning.

  • 20.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Is ICF a valid tool for structuring health information?2007In: 5th Scandinavian Conference on Health Informatics and 11th Swedish National Term Conference: Kalmar, October 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Pless, Mia
    Exploring changes over time in habilitation professionals' perceptions and applications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for children and youth (ICF-CY)2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 670-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:This study explored how professionals in interdisciplinary teams perceived the implementation of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) in Swedish habilitation services.

    Design:Descriptive longitudinal mixed-methods design.

    Methods:Following participation in a 2-day in-service training on the ICF-CY, 113 professionals from 14 interdisciplinary teams described their perceptions of the implementation of the ICF-CY at 3 consecutive time-points: during in-service training, after 1 year, and after 2.5 years.

    Results:Implementation of the ICF-CY in daily work focused on assessment and habilitation planning and required adaptations of routines and materials. The ICF-CY was perceived as useful in supporting analyses and in communication about children’s needs. Professionals also perceived it as contributing to new perspectives on problems and a sharpened focus on participation.

    Conclusion:Professionals indicated that the ICF-CY enhanced their awareness of families’ views of child participation, which corresponded to organizational goals for habilitation services. An implementation finding was a lack of tools fitting the comprehensive ICF-CY perspective. The study points to the need for ICF-CY-based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation.

  • 22.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala universitet.
    Professionals' views of children's everyday life situations and the relation to participation2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 581-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to determine professionals’ views of everyday life situations (ELS) of importance for children and to explore how ELS correlate with the construct ‘Participation’. This study was part of a larger work to develop a structured tool with code sets to identify child participation and support children with disabilities to describe what matters most for them in intervention planning.

    Method: The study had a concurrent mixed methods design. Information from one open-ended question and questionnaires were linked to the ICF-CY component Activities and Participation. Two concurrent data sets were compared.

    Results: Proposed ELS were distributed across ICF-CY categories from low to high level of complexity and context specificity. The correlation with participation became stronger for the later chapters of the component (d7-d9). Differences between respondents due to working field, country, and children’s ages were explored. Acts and tasks seemed most important for the youngest children whereas ELS shifted towards societal involvement for adolescents.

    Conclusion: Eleven categories related to ICF-CY chapters d3-d9 emerged as ELS. Two age groups (infants/preschoolers and adolescents) are required to develop code sets for the new tool. The results need triangulation with other concurrent studies to provide corroborating evidence and add a family perspective.

  • 23.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala universitet.
    Om ICF/ICF-CY i egna rutiner och daglig samverkan: Workshop2008In: Att använda ICF-CY: Västerås sept, 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Johnson, Ensa
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pain management for children with cerebral palsy in school settings in two cultures: Action and reaction approaches2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) face particular challenges, e.g. daily pain that threaten their participation in school activities. This study focuses on how teachers, personal assistants, and clinicians in two countries with different cultural prerequisites, Sweden and South Africa, manage the pain of children in school settings. Method: Participants’ statements collected in focus groups were analysed using a directed qualitative content analysis framed by a Frequency of attendance-Intensity of involvement model, which was modified into a Knowing-Doing model. Results: Findings indicated that pain management focused more on children’s attendance in the classroom than on their involvement, and a difference between countries in terms of action-versus-reaction approaches. Swedish participants reported action strategies to prevent pain whereas South African participants primarily discussed interventions when observing a child in pain. Conclusion: Differences might be due to school- and healthcare systems. To provide effective support when children with CP are in pain in school settings, an action-and-reaction approach would be optimal and the use of alternative and augmentative communication strategies would help to communicate children’s pain. As prevention of pain is desired, structured surveillance and treatment programs are recommended along with trustful collaboration with parents and access to “hands-on” pain management when needed.

  • 25.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Klang, Nina
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen university.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Participation as the Focus of Intervention:  Cultural Diversity and Universal Characteristics2011In: / [ed] Michael Guralnick, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation as a construct can be applied on all ecological levels from participation for individual children in their everyday life to participation for all as a societal goal. It is defined in the ICF-CY as involvement in a life situation. Participation is occurring at the nodal point between children and their environments. Contexts vary with socio-economical standards, culture and geographical characteristics and thus also the expressions of participation. This presentation will discuss cultural diversity in children’s participation in relation to the universal characteristics of participation defined as “being there” and participation defined as “degree of engagement while being there”. The utility of the ICF-CY as a tool to analyze universal characteristics and cultural diversity in conditions for, and actual experiences of, participation are examined in findings from five studies: 1) Maxwell et al. have analyzed national, regional and local educational policy documents in Scotland and Sweden regarding children in need of special support  in relation to conditions for participation and participation; 2) Ståhl et al. have linked and compared ICF-CY codes to information regarding children’s health in Child Health Care and School Health Care and analyzed whether biomedical or participation information is the focus of the information; 3) Adolfsson et al. have collected and compared data from respondents in Sweden, the USA, and Portugal concerning what professionals consider to be important everyday situations for child participation; 4) Klang et al. has studied domains of participation and environment related to child and caregiver interaction in a Russian context to identify factors related to participation; and 5) Ullenhag et al. have studied participation in  leisure activities and  leisure activity preferences  of Swedish children and compared with data from the Netherlands and Canada using the same questionnaire.

  • 26.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala universitet.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Identifying Child Functioning from an ICF-CY Perspective: Everyday Life Situations Explored in Measures of Participation2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 13-14, p. 1230-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. This study was part of a larger work to develop an authentic measure consisting of code sets for self- or proxy-report of child participation. The aim was to identify common everyday life situations of children and youth based on measures of participation.

    Method. The study was descriptive in nature and involved several stages: systematic search of literature to find articles presenting measures for children and youth with disabilities, identifying measures in selected articles, linking items in included measures to the ICF-CY, analysing content in measures presented as performance and participation and identifying aggregations of ICF-CY codes across these measures.

    Results. A large number of measures for children and youth with disabilities were identified but only 12 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A slight distinction in content and age appropriateness appeared. Measures presented as performance covered all the ICF-CY Activities and Participation chapters, whereas measures presented as participation covered five of nine chapters. Three common everyday life situations emerged from the measures: Moving around, Engagement in play and Recreation and leisure.

    Conclusion. Only a small number of life situations for children and youth emerged from items in selected measures, thus, other sources are needed to identify more everyday life situations.

  • 27.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, M
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ibragimova, N
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    WHO:s Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in Child- and Youth Habilitation2007In: Presentation at The 5th conference on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Oslo, June 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Bickenbach, Jerome
    Disability Policy Unit, Swiss Paraplegic Research. Faculty of Humanities and social Sciences, University of Lucerne.
    Användning av ICFoch ICF-CY.: Workshop2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Användbarhet av ICF/ICF-CY inom Barn- och ungdomshabilitering2007In: / [ed] Högskolan i Jönköping och Mälardalens högskola, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Införande av ICF-CY i habiliteringsverksamhet2008In: Att använda ICF-CY: Västerås,  sept 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Everyday Life Situations for Child Participation2011In: / [ed] Michael Guralnick, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child Participation is defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health forChildren and Youth (ICF-CY) as involvement in life situations but knowledge on children´s specific everydaylife situations (EDLs) is lacking. Professionals in early intervention services need a structured tool to identifyand assess child participation in everyday life situations. It should support children with disabilities indescribing what matters most for them in intervention planning. With the long term goal to create ICF-CY codesets, EDLs were identified by a systematic literature search for measures of performance or participation andby collecting professional opinions on EDL and participation. Information was linked to the ICF-CY andtriangulated with research exploring family opinions. Most items in measures were linked to moving around,play, and recreation and leisure. The six measures of performance and six of participation differed regardingcontent and content dependent on age group.Descriptions on EDLs from 297 professionals were linked to ICF-CY codes. Frequent linkages were Self-care,such as eating and hygiene; Major life areas, such as play and education; and Relationships, but also sleep. Byrelating EDLs directly to predefined ICF-CY categories in the ICF-CY component Activities and Participation,five EDLs across categories were identified based on responses from 207 professionals. These concernedsleep, communication, dressing, family relationships and play. Some differences emerged dependent onparticipants’ culture and on age group. A triangulation between professional and family opinions concerningEDL’s revealed relatively high agreement. As a final result, a set of approximately 12-15 everyday lifesituations is expected to be identified in this study to be used for development of code sets.

  • 32.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J
    School of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Sauer Lee, Andrea
    Ellingsen, Kirsten
    Alfred I duPont hospital for children, Wilmington, DE, USA.
    CHAPTER 27: Major life areas: Play and Education (d810-d880, ICF-CY)2012In: Measures for Children with Developmental Disabilities: An ICF-CY approach / [ed] Annette Majnemer, London: Mac Keith Press , 2012, 1, p. 404-415Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simmeborn Fleischer, Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Applying the ICF to identify requirements for students with Asperger syndrome in higher education2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 190-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education requires more than academic skills and everyday student-life can be stressful. Students with Asperger Syndrome (AS) may need support to manage their education due to difficulties in social functioning.

    Objective: As preparation for the development of a structured tool to guide student and coordinator dialogues at Swedish universities, this study aimed to identify ICF categories that reflect requirements in everyday student-life for students with AS.

    Methods: Using descriptive qualitative approach; information in documents reflecting the perspectives of university students; international classifications; user/health organisations and education authorities were linked to ICF codes.

    Results: In total, 114 ICF categories were identified, most of which related to learning, tasks and demands, communication and interactions.

    Conclusion: Students with AS need varying accommodations to be successful in higher education. In the future, ICF based code sets, including demands on student roles, can be used as checklists to describe functioning and needs for support.

  • 34.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    ICF-CY as a Framework for Understanding Child Engagement in Preschool2018In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engagement in preschool predicts children's development, learning, and wellbeing in later school years. The time children engage in activities and social interactions is conditional for preschool inclusion. Engagement is part of the construct participation, which is determined by attendance and involvement. Two suggested underlying dimensions of engagement had been identified as essential when assessing children's participation in preschool activities. As engagement is a key question in inclusion of all children, and preschool becomes a common context for them, it is increasingly important to understand the concept of engagement in those settings. In Sweden most children attend preschool but children in need of special support tend not to receive enough support for their everyday functioning. This study aimed to conceptualize child engagement in preschool with ICF-CY as a framework to clarify core and developmental engagement dimensions included in Child Engagement Questionnaire (CEQ). The content of CEQ was identified through linking processes based on ICF linking rules with some exceptions. Specific challenges and solutions were acknowledged. To identify engagement dimensions in the ICF-CY, CEQ items related to ICF-CY chapters were integrated in the two-dimensional model of engagement. Findings showed that engagement measured for preschool ages was mostly related to Learning and Applying knowledge belonging to Activities and Participation but the linkage detected missing areas. Broader perspectives of children's everyday functioning require extended assessment with consideration to mutual influences between activities, participation, body functions, and contextual factors. Related to core and developmental engagement, findings highlight the importance for preschool staff to pay attention to how children do things, not only what they do. Activities related to core engagement include basic skills; those related to developmental engagement set higher demands on the child. Linking challenges related to preschool context were not consistent with those reported for child health. Using the ICF-CY as a framework with a common language may lead to open discussions among persons around the child, clarify the different perspectives and knowledges of the persons, and facilitate decisions on how to implement support to a child in everyday life situations in preschool and at home.

  • 35.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Westerberg, Christina
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro Universitet.
    Everyday Life Situations of School-Aged Children with Severe Disabilities: What are the Goals for the Future? An Exploratory Study2014In: Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment, E-ISSN 2292-2598, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated present and future everyday life situations (ELS) in home, school, work, and leisure environments for a group of school-aged children with severe disabilities, including complex disorders and a combination of disabilities. The purpose was to explore universal ELS; clarify how the children can be supported in their development of autonomy; and to gather information on potential overall goals for interventions. To make data comparable, all reported ELS were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) and listed along with information on the setting. Both today, and in the future, recreational activities and participation in school or work were of highest importance, but few reported ELS involved directly interacting with other children. More ELS were predicted to occur outside the home and with a higher degree of autonomy. Therefore, interventions would be focused on the overall goal that children with severe disabilities take initiatives to become independent and to form relationships with others.

  • 36.
    Albrecht, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Play interventions supporting the social and emotional development of preschool children with externalizing emotional and behavioral difficulties: A systematic literature review from 2000 to 20172017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The number of preschool children displaying externalizing emotional and behavioral difficulties is constantly increasing. At the same time, these children often lack social and emotional skills as well. Even though more and more children display this noticeable behavior and preschool teachers are constantly reporting being overwhelmed with these children’s behavior in preschool, a high number of children do not receive any support or intervention. Play provides appropriate means to support children’s social and emotional development as play has a significant importance in young children’s development. The aim of this systematic literature review is to get a better understanding through previous research on which play interventions have been found to facilitate the social-emotional development in preschool children with externalizing emotional and behavioral difficulties. Six studies with six different play-oriented interventions have been identified through this review. The results show that all interventions had either positive outcomes on the social-emotional development or show a decrease in emotional or behavioral difficulties. The factors which have been found as facilitating to these outcomes were use of play, intervention setting, awareness of others, involvement of licensed professionals, a safe environment and culturally and ethnically representative toys. This review provides a comprehensive overview on effective play-based interventions in preschool setting. However, further research is needed to examine individual environmental, familial and participation factors as well as specific training for preschool teachers.

  • 37.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    et al.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Foster, Jonathan K.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Joosten, Annette
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Tang, Julia
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Leung, Denise
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Visual search strategies during facial recognition in children with ASD2014In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 559-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facial recognition is a complex skill necessary for successful human interpersonal and social interactions. Given that the most prevalent disorder of social interaction is autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a number of studies have investigated and found impaired facial recognition abilities in people with ASD. Further, this impairment may be critically involved in mediating the deficits in interpersonal and social interactions in people with ASD. We sought to address the question of whether face processing is impaired in children with ASD in the current study. While there were a number of differences in visual search behaviours between the 19 children with ASD and the 15 controls, this did not manifest in deficits in facial recognition accuracy. In addition, there were notable differences with respect to eye fixation behaviours and recognition accuracy in this study compared to the findings in a previous similar study conducted in adults with ASD. These differences suggest a performance enhancing developmental trajectory in facial processing in controls that may not be present in individuals with ASD.

  • 38.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    et al.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Stuart, Geoffrey W.
    Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Rehabilitation Medicine, Linköping University and Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, UHL, County Council, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Leung, Denise
    Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Foster, Jonathan K.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Brief Report: Visual Acuity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders2014In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 2369-2374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been heightened interest in suggestions of enhanced visual acuity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) which was sparked by evidence that was later accepted to be methodologically flawed. However, a recent study that claimed children with ASD have enhanced visual acuity (Brosnan et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 42:2491–2497, 2012) repeated a critical methodological flaw by using an inappropriate viewing distance for a computerised acuity test, placing the findings in doubt. We examined visual acuity in 31 children with ASD and 33 controls using the 2 m 2000 Series Revised Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart placed at twice the conventional distance to better evaluate possible enhanced acuity. Children with ASD did not demonstrate superior acuity. The current findings strengthen the argument that reports of enhanced acuity in ASD are due to methodological flaws and challenges the reported association between visual acuity and systemising type behaviours.

  • 39.
    Almberg, Maria
    et al.
    Mobility Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selander, Helena
    Mobility Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Experiences of facilitators or barriers in driving education from learner and novice drivers with ADHD or ASD and their driving instructors2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) experience any specific facilitators or barriers to driving education.

    Objective: To explore the facilitators or barriers to driving education experienced by individuals with ASD or ADHD who obtained a learner’s permit, from the perspective of the learner drivers and their driving instructors.

    Methods: Data were collected from 33 participants with ASD or ADHD, and nine of their driving instructors.

    Results: Participants with ASD required twice as many driving lessons and more on-road tests than those with ADHD. Participants with ADHD repeated the written tests more than those with ASD. Driving license theory was more challenging for individuals with ADHD, whilst individuals with ASD found translating theory into practice and adjusting to “unfamiliar” driving situations to be the greatest challenges.

    Conclusion: Obtaining a driving license was associated with stressful training experience.

  • 40. Almqvist, L
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Pathways of engagement of young children with and without developmental delay2007In: Paper presented at the 2nd ISEI Conference, University of Zagreb, Croatia, June 14-16, 2007., 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41. Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Hellnäs, Petra
    Stefansson, Maria
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    I can play! Young children's perceptions of health2006In: Pediatric Rehabilitation, ISSN 1363-8491, E-ISSN 1464-5270, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 275-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health is today viewed as a multi-dimensional concept partly conceptualized independent from not being ill. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of how young children perceive health. Interviews were conducted with 68 children (4–5 years), within their pre-school setting, with the help of a semi-structured interview guide. A multi-dimensional perspective represented by the health dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was used in a manifest deductive content analysis. The children's statements were categorized and placed under one of the four health dimensions, body, activity, participation and environment. A latent content analysis was applied to identify underlying themes in the manifest categories. The results revealed that young children perceive health as a multi-dimensional construct, largely related to being engaged, i.e. to be able to perform wanted activities and participate in a supportive every-day context. This implies that improvements of child engagement should be emphasized in health promotion and to a greater extent be the central focus of health interventions for young children

  • 42.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children’s behavior difficulties and staff-implemented special support in Swedish preschools: Emotional and behavioral difficultiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Health, Care, and Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Department of Special Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Special support for behavior difficulties and engagement in Swedish preschools2018In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 3, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum stipulates that all children independent of support needs should attend mainstream preschool groups, with equal opportunities for learning and engagement. Preschool teachers are responsible for paying attention to children in need of special support to achieve this. How support is provided for children in need of special support due to behavior difficulties in Swedish preschools varies, however. Some children, often formally identified as in need of special support, are supported by preschool staff supervised by external services. Other children receive support initiated and implemented by preschool staff, without supervision from external services. A further number of children receive no support for behavior difficulties, on top of what is provided to all children. This study investigated associations between support format (i.e. supervised support, staff-initiated support or no additional support), support content (i.e. implementation of support), behavior difficulties, socio-demographics and engagement. A mixed methods approach was used with a sample of 232 preschool children 15 to 71 months with assessed behavior difficulties. Preschool staff reported on the children's engagement, behavior difficulties, socio-demographics and support provision. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the probability of children receiving either support format. Content analysis was used to categorize the support content, reported by preschool staff through open-ended questions. Point-biserial correlations were used to test associations between support content, behavior, socio-demographics and engagement. All children receiving supervised support for behavior difficulties were formally identified by external services as in need of special support. Supervised support was also more common if children disturbed the free play in the preschool group, with the most frequent support being collaboration with external teams. Staff-initiated support was most commonly given to children with high engagement, and for children who are not early second language learners. These children were most frequently supported by staff paying attention to negative behavior. Children who were not perceived as a burden to the group were less likely to receive any form of additional support. Ways of managing the preschool group seem to guide support strategies for children with behavior difficulties, rather than child-focused strategies emphasizing engagement in everyday activities.

  • 44.
    Alves, Ines
    et al.
    Consiglio Nazionale sulla Disabilità (CND), Italy.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Moretti, Marta
    Pädagogische Hochschule Zürich, Switzerland.
    A systematic literature review of the situation of the ICF and the ICF-CY in education2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) is meant to be a universal language for professionals working with functioning and health in children and adults. So far most applications of ICF have been in the field of health sciences. Is it also applicable to education? This paper aims to present the outcome of a systematic literature review in the fields of education, more specifically education of children with disabilities or special educational needs and the ICF. Devised as a complementary classification of health and functioning by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2001 with a child and youth version (ICF-CY) published in 2007, the ICF appears to be mostly used in the medical field with reviews highlighting its use and applications (Bruyère, Van Looy, & Peterson, 2005). Thus, this literature review intends to situate the current debates in education which relate to the ICF and its concepts, and also to report the extent to which it is being used. The major interest is to explore how the ICF/ICF-CY, are currently situated in the field of education.

    Method

    This study uses a systematic review of the literature using database keyword searches. The keywords used to search in the databases were applied after qualitative test searches were carried out to establish the suitability of the terms. The selection of studies was then refined further using inclusion and exclusion protocols. The protocols  investigated the paper contents at different levels: abstract, full -text, and full-text quality level. In addition an extraction protocol is also used on the included documents to draw on the points which arise from the research questions and provide the basis for the main discussion. Studies exploring the relationship between education, the ICF and its related concepts: participation, environment, and personal factors were reviewed.

     

    Bruyère, S. M., Van Looy, S. A., & Peterson, D. B. (2005). The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Contemporary Literature Overview.   Rehabilitation Psychology 50(2), 113-121.

    WHO. (2001). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Geneva: WHO. WHO. (2007). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Version for Children and Youth, ICF-CY. Geneva: WHO.

  • 45.
    Andrews, Jaimi
    et al.
    School of Exercise and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Exercise and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Community participation interventions for children and adolescents with neurodevelopmental intellectual disability: A systematic review2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 825-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The Relationship Between Intelligence Quotient and Aspects of Everyday Functioning and Participation for People Who Have Mild and Borderline Intellectual Disabilities2018In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 31, no 1, p. e68-e78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study explored the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and aspects of everyday functioning/participation in individuals (age 16–40) who have a mild/borderline intellectual disability (IQ 55–85).

    Method

    Correlations were examined between IQ and (i) self-rated (n = 72) ability, participation as performance (how often an activity is performed), important participation restriction (not/seldom performing an activity perceived as important) and general well-being and (ii) proxy-rated (n = 41) ability and participation as performance.

    Results

    No significant correlations between IQ and any of the explored measures were found. However, the effect sizes of the correlations between IQ and ability were considered as small but not negligible.

    Conclusions

    The results support the notion that IQ is a poor predictor of general aspects of everyday functioning in persons with mild/borderline intellectual disability. The result indicates that self-ratings partly generate other information than proxy ratings which may be important for assessments of supportive requirements and diagnosis.

  • 47.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Rheumatology, Linköping University, Linköping , Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro , Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 15, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability.

    Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n  = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being.

    Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as “important participation”, while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with “important participation restriction”. Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = –0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r = –0.55).

    Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 48.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    DESIGN: Structured interview study.

    SUBJECTS: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    METHODS: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    RESULTS: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cronbach’s alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations > 0.5 (mean = 0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% > 0.5 (mean = 0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% > 0.5 (mean = 0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    CONCLUSION: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 49. Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, M
    Factors related to self-fated participation in adolescents and adults with mild intellectual disability: A systematic literature review2008In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 277-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Self-rated participation is a clinically relevant intervention outcome for people with mild intellectual disability. The aim of this systematic review was to analyse empirical studies that explored relationships between either environmental factors or individual characteristics and aspects of participation in young adults with mild intellectual disability. Method Four databases were used, 756 abstracts examined and 24 studies were evaluated in-depth. Results Four aspects of participation were found: involvement, perceptions of self, self-determination and psychological well-being. Reported environmental factors were: social support, choice opportunity, living conditions, school, work and leisure, attitudes, physical availability and society. Reported individual characteristics were adaptive and social skills. Conclusions There is a relative lack of studies of factors influencing self-rated participation and existing studies are difficult to compare because of disparity regarding approaches, conceptual frameworks, etc. For adequate interventions, it seems important to study how profiles of participation are influenced by different patterns of environmental factors and individual characteristics.

  • 50. Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, M
    Factors with a positive relation to self rated participation in adolescent and adult people with mild intellectual disability: a systematic literature review2007In: Oral presentation 30 min: The international summit for an alliance on social inclusion, AAMR Montréal, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
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