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  • 1.
    Adilson, Leite Cancino
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Chatzidakis, Nikolaos
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    The Influence of Internal and Externalfactors on the Supplier Selection: A study in the Swedish Furniture Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Agndal, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Jensen, Leif-Magnus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Market innovation in the transport and heavy vehicle market2015In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual NOFOMA-Conference, Molde, 3-5 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to generate a greater understanding of the interrelatedness of new business models in the truck market and developments in the road transport sector.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on a three year research project in cooperation with a European heavy vehicle manufacturer, we present short case descriptions showing some of the main developments in the European trucking and transport markets. 

    Findings

    New business models emerge both in the heavy vehicle and transportation markets, in complex ways involving multiple actors.  The impetus for the models can come from several direction but the final impact must be negotiated and cannot be planned by a single actor.

    Research limitations/implications

    The research looks at a selection of cases and business models to demonstrate changes and the relations between the markets, and does not claim to be exhaustive in terms of the different business models in the European market. 

    Practical implications

    There is a distinct trend to greater specialization and the need for innovation to survive given the strong pressures in the commoditized transport market. Our findings show conflicting trends in terms of social implications, with improved ecological impact but the risk of worse conditions for driver. 

    Original/value

    The paper considers the development of new business models and implications on the market from the point of view of the firms actually using the business models.  This shows how different business models can co-exist and involve different types of rationalities.

  • 3.
    Ahmadkhani, Ali
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Reverse side of logistics in automotive industry2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The third party logistics (3PL) providers play remarkable function in the business world of today’s; therefore, to investigate their challenges will be a valuable study. This study has investigated the challenges and ways to manage these challenges by a 3PL provide company. The achieved results are in coordination with the literature to some extent.The most important challenges are cost, flexibility, professionalism, and quality ofservices. In managing the 3PL challenges, theoretical views mostly tend to apply distinguished approaches, tools and algorithms. Meanwhile, in the case study, it has not introduced any specific approaches or algorithm, but mostly proposed the traditional approaches, such as doing researches and investigations, or Motivation Management. 

  • 4.
    Ahmed, Kemal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Naqvi, Syed Mohammed
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Postponement in Retailing Industry: A case study of SIBA2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Master’s Thesis in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    _____________________________________________________

    Title:                 Postponement in Retailing Industry- A case study of SIBA

    Authors:         Ahmed Kemal & Naqvi Syed Mohammad

    Tutor:               Helgi Valur Fredriksson, Dr.

    Date:               May, 2010

    Key Words:   Speculation, Postponement, Customer Order Decoupling point,

    Retailing, Supply Chain Flexibility, Agility

    ______________________________________________________________

    Abstract

    Problem: Today's business environment is characterized by changing customer demands, increasing cost pressures on retailers, shorter product life cycles and products becoming obsolete shortly after their introduction. The above factors make it difficult for electronics retailers to balance the costs of dealing with excessive inventory and not be out of stock. To be competitive, retailers should delay some of their activities until customer demand becomes visible. This brings us to the phenomenon of postponement. Electronics market in Sweden faces continuous growth, although at a declining rate. This is indicative of a saturation that this sector, as a whole, is approaching to. The above problems are due to the speculative approaches and standardized products policies that are in practice. Loss of sales and customers result from these practices. The current study analyses the importance of postponement strategy and the benefits it offers. This study also tries to explore the potential solutions for retailers that postponement may relate to.

     

    Purpose: The scope of this study is to identify possible postponement strategies needed for SIBA.

    Method: A case study approach has been taken. The choice of the method is qualitative with an inductive approach. This involved personal communications during interviews with the managers of SIBA, using semi structured questions to collect data.

     

    Results: The concepts of postponement, supply chain flexibility, agility and customer order decoupling points (CODP) are closely related to one another and it has been shown that as the depth of postponement increase from right to left in the CODP continuum, the CODP changes its position, moving along the CODP continuum from right to left and towards the upstream. With this movement, the flexibility and agility in the chain increases. Our finds suggest that postponement is rather underutilized and that wastes (by way of lost sales and customers, obsolete inventory costs and storage costs) in the retailing process occur due to speculative approaches in application at the retail level. We have suggested logistics postponement for two out of three product categories and enumerated the ensuing benefits that the retailer can derive by way of enhanced flexibility, agility and reductions in wastages and satisfied customers.

  • 5.
    Aijaz, Humayun
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Butt, Faisal Suhail
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    BARRIERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTRONIC COMMERCE: A STUDY OF PAKISTANI ENVIORNMENT2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    E-commerce has flourished in the developed world and is playing an important role in the everyday lives of the people and national economies. The developing nations are far behind in this regard even though their governments have made considerable efforts to encourage e-commerce. This thesis is a study of the environmental factors that act as barriers to the development of e-commerce in Pakistan. It shows the nature and the level of hindrance these environmental factors have caused and there relation to one another. In order to make a national analysis, environmental factors have been stretched to include the government, businesses, consumers, physical infrastructures, social and cultural factors. A qualitative study was conducted via telephonic and written interviews from academic and professional experts, users and non users of e-commerce in Pakistan. The analysis of these interviews revealed that not all of the factors considered as e-commerce barriers for developing nations were present in Pakistan. The relation between different e-commerce barriers was studied and further, additional barriers were also identified. Low literacy rate, traditional economic sector, failure of government to successfully implement e-commerce initiatives and regulations, shortage of electrical supply and low demand for online businesses and the consumer purchasing behaviour of Pakistanis were identified as the main e-commerce barriers.

  • 6.
    Alabdullatif, Talal
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    SABIC Green Logistics Systems & Profitability: To explore chemical industries green logistics and contribution to profitability with a particular case of SABIC2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Logistics is paramount in the business operations as it ensures transit of goods from one point to the other. Green logistics are measures in the logistics systems that are put in place to minimize the environmental implication of logistics operations while at the same time saving on cost. Thus, green logistics is adopted as it conveys a competitive merit which enhances performance of a company. Saudi Basic Industries (SABIC) is one of the biggest petrochemicals in Saudi Arabia and holds the fifth position in the world among the leading producers of petrochemicals. The company already has green logistics in place.

    Purpose: To explore chemical industries green logistics practices and profitability with a particular case study of SABIC. The goal of this paper was achieved by investigating how has SABIC incorporated green practices into supply chain operations to remain profitable. The study answers “how has chemical industries incorporated green practices into supply chain operations to stay profitable?’ And “how do logistic managers recognize green logistics and to what level do chemical industries apply green logistics? Investigating a chemical industry green logistics is important as it contributes to literature since no single study has been carried out in this area. Suggestions from this study are crucial to SABIC, other chemical industry besides any other industry since in one way or the other companies do logistics.

    Method: The study utilized interpretivism. This study was a case study type of thesis focusing merely on SABIC, and it employed induction approach as well as the qualitative method of collecting data.  Interviews were used to explore the experiences, beliefs, motivations and views of individual participants. Using non-probability sampling method, five members in SABIC supply chain department were selected.

    Conclusion: The results show that SABIC or chemical industries utilize most of the green logistics activities (fuel efficiency, route optimization package optimization and calculating carbon emission). However, it was found out that fuel efficiency, route optimizations, and packaging optimization were most common activities. It was also discovered that one major objective of chemical industries going green was to cut cost which contributes positively to its profitability. However, reverse logistics was not familiar because of its nature; it cannot be sufficient on its own.

  • 7.
    Andersen, Alexander
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Brewitz, Ludvig
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Collaboration within Supply Chains: Can conflicts be attributed to the different roles of logistics companies?2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction – Supply chains increase in size and complexity, more actors are becoming involved and an increased collaboration among actors are a necessity. Still, undesired conflicts occurs and are unavoidable in a collaboration. There are ways to reduce the negative effects and improve management of conflicts provided by previous researchers focus on conflicts and conflict management in general. However, this thesis emphazises on investigating what conflicts that occur within different collaboration setups that can be attributed to the type of logistics company involved. Therefore, the following purpose is stated:

    Investigate what types of conflicts occurring during collaboration that can be attributed to the different roles of 3PL and 4PL companies.

    Methodology – To answer the purpose a single case study was conducted which involved a focal firm and its collaboration with two different logistics companies (a 3PL and a 4PL) within the same economical climate. Due to the uniqeness of the case, a multiple methods qualitative study was performed and to strengthen the validity of the data collected both documantary analysis as well as semi-structured interviews were conducted. Respondents were handpicked based on knowledge of both collaboration setups, to ensure quality of the data collected. Gathered data were sumarized and categorized using Mamad and Chahdi (2013) conflict factors, and later analyzed to accurately detect key points to generate a result and answer the research questions.

    Result – To summarize the result, findings of what we discovered through our data analysis generated similarites and differences in conflicts occurred within both collaboration setups. These conflicts are linked to Mamad and Chahdi (2013) conflicts factors regarding collaboration among actors, in order to clarify why and which conflict area these conflicts occurred in.

    Analysis – From the conflicts identified in the result, further analysis were conducted. Where, previous literature regarding logistics companies (3pl and 4PL) were applied in order to enable attribution of conflicts to company types.

    Conclusion – Through the analysis, many conflicts that occured are based on factors such as operational structure, problem solving and company policies which are not affected by the company type. However, three conflicts and problem areas can be connected to be generally more common either with 3PL companies or 4PL companies. The first lies within the commitment area where 3PL companies can generally be seen as less committed. The second area is communication were important information were more often late due to passing through more actors, causing more conflicts when collaborating with a 4PL. The last problem area were within formalization where findings suggests that there are conflicts caused by 4PLs using several carriers which causes problems such as varying regulations and truck dimensions from carriers. 

  • 8.
    Andersson, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Koyumdzhieva, Tsvetelina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Green Product Design: Aspects and practices within the furniture industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate how green product design has been practiced within the Swedish furniture industry. Furthermore, to investigate how green product design can reduce the negative impact on the environment.

    Theoretical framework - The literature used to serve as a base for this paper includes some aspects concerning Green Supply Chain Management, but fundamentally concerns green or environmentally conscious design, motivators for designing „green‟ products, such as legislation, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), internal policy documents and/or green guidelines/certificates, innovation, competitiveness, economic performance, brand image and reputation, and others. Consequently, factors for product design itself were discussed, such as environmentally conscious design, efficient utilization of materials, minimizing waste, time and cost efficiency, types of materials used, etc. Moreover, sustainability aspects are considered vital, namely economic, social and environmental practices, as particular attention is paid to the economic and environmental aspects.

    Methodology - For the purpose of this research paper, (multiple) case studies were chosen to be implemented. One face-to-face, two telephone and two Skype/online interviews were conducted based on semi-structured interview questions. The data collected is from four companies, two of them preferred to remain anonymous, i.e. Office Furniture and Office Design, and the other two were Kinnarps and Skandiform.

    Findings - The empirical findings gathered for this research comply with the majority of theoretical data provided. A number of the most important and applicable green product design factors, and more specifically the aim of reducing negative environmental impacts, drive companies to implement environmentally conscious design, efficient utilization of materials, minimizing waste, costs associated, types of materials used, product safety, among many others. Furthermore, economic, social and environmental (overall regarded as sustainability for the purpose of this paper) factors are taken into consideration. Economic and environmental issues were mostly discussed and pinpointed as essential.

    Conclusions - Green product design should follow a number of important factors in order to reduce the negative impacts on the environment. It is essential to understand a company‟s motivation for designing green products. Nevertheless, such factors as well as economic aspects regarding green design should be complementing each other.

  • 9.
    Anello, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Plucinski, Matthias
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Improving the Inbound Flow of a Manufacturing Company: Leveraging dimensions of a buyer-supplier relationship to influence the on-time delivery performance in an inbound supply chain - A case study within the Swedish manufacturing industry2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Competition nowadays occurs between different supply chains, rather than between individual firms. Thus, it is not enough to measure the performance of a company individually, but the relationships between companies need to be taken into consideration as well. The need to broaden and complement their internally focused performance measurement practices has been recognized by manufacturing companies, which moved from arm-length purchasing transactions towards buyer-supplier relationships (BSRs). In this context, the focus lies on the connection between dimensions of a buyer-supplier relationship (BSR) and on-time delivery (OTD) performance.

     

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore different dimensions of BSRs within a manufacturing company’s inbound supply chain, to identify potential difficulties within those dimensions as well as to integrate problem solving approaches into a checklist. Thus, the thesis aims at generating contributions to literature considering the detected research gaps.

     

    Method: This study is following an abductive approach due to the possibility to simultaneously review existing theory when analyzing the empirical findings. Furthermore, an exploratory and qualitative study has been chosen in order to take a deep dive into means of actively using and shaping BSRs to improve the OTD performance. Empirical data has been gathered through semi-structured and focus group interviews with companies operating in the manufacturing industry. The empirical data has been analyzed using summarizing, categorizing and pattern matching.

     

    Conclusions: Analyzing and comparing empirical findings with literature revealed a connection between BSR dimensions and OTD performance. The dimensions extracted from literature have thereby been supported by the empirical findings, even though they did not prove to be equally applicable for both buyers and suppliers. In addition to that three further dimensions have been identified in the case study, namely Competence, Internal Collaboration and Product Portfolio, showing a significant improvement potential for the underlying business relationship as well as the manufacturing industry in general. Besides the fact that the formulated research questions have been answered another significant insight of the study might be helpful for practitioners: When considering the high number of parties involved into the execution of an inbound supply chain as well as their various impacts on different BSR dimensions, it becomes clear that OTD performance should not be measured as a supplier KPI but rather as a supply chain KPI.

  • 10.
    Angelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Leivo, Piia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    The bottleneck effect of road transportation at the Finnish - Russian border stations: A prospective “One-stop” border crossing model2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The flow of goods to Russia has grown faster than the bottleneck can handle and the infrastructure on Finnish eastern borders has been stretched to the limit. The authors choose this topic according to their educational background and the direct and indirect future opportunities that can rise up for everybody by a possible solution.

    Purpose

    The main purpose of this thesis was to identify the main reasons for the inefficient border crossing process at the border station in Vaalimaa. The authors will analyse the current situation at the border crossing station in Vaalimaa from two different perspectives: Finnish Customs and Logistics Companies. The authors will propose a possible solution by improving the border crossing process

    Methodology

    Qualitative research method is used in order to get the most dependable information for the reasons of the problems. The aim was to get information about the current situation at the border crossing point in Vaalimaa rather than quantitative information. The qualitative research method will allow authors to go deeper inside the topic by interviewing the logistics companies, who are using the route via Finland to Russia and, as well as, Finnish customs and border guards, who are working in Vaalimaa. After the data collection, the authors will propose their own solution for the crossing border problems and they will conclude the research by measuring its validity and reliability.

    Conclusion

    The authors will present the main reasons for the inefficient border crossing process, which are bureaucracy, legislation issues, criminality level and poor IT-systems. In order to solve the problem and manage all the possible changes, Russia and EU should have a closely cooperation in any level. The authors after analysing the current situation in Vaalimaa, created the “One-stop” model as an improvement of the whole border crossing process.

  • 11.
    Angelova, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Petrachkova, Irina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Cold chain management in the food industry of Sweden: Enhanced utilization of temperature monitoring solutions2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    Angjelov, Petar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Rosén, Carl
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Risk Management within purchasing: The effect of increased uncertainty on purchasing strategy A case study on Swedish SMEs during the Russian crisis of 20152015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades more and more companies started to purchase internationally. Due to the liberalization of countries borders, better communication technology and better infrastructure even small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) engaged into international trade. This allowed them to combine core competency with the ones from suppliers and by that to achieve better market competitiveness. In the same time this widening of network is exposing the small and medium size enterprises to greater risk.

    The purpose of this study is to explore what purchasing risk management strategies small and medium size enterprises apply in order to reduce exposure to environmental risk, and analyze the reasoning behind their choice. The research is done in the context of increased uncertainty for Swedish companies buying from Russia.

    For this study, abductive research approach has been applied and a qualitative study has been carried out using a multiple case study research strategy. Empirical data has been collected by conducting semi-structured interviews with four Swedish SMEs that import from Russia. The findings have been analyzed using the existing theory elaborated in the frame of references.

    The main findings from the analysis are that Swedish SMEs use strategies like Safety stock, Single sourcing and Multiple sourcing in order to protect themselves in purchasing. Furthermore the analysis show that none of these strategies is used in a manner to protect from external environmental risks, and that SME`s managers do not take these risks in consideration when constructing purchasing strategies. By using the scenario of increased uncertainty because of the Russian political situation the analysis concluded that managers change their attitude toward environmental risk in purchasing drastically if the companies are exposed to the same type of risk. After realization of the environmental risk the companies are exposed to, all of the case companies employed multiple sourcing in order to hedge against this risk.

  • 13.
    Arvidsson, Jonathan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Kojic, Daniel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Critical Success Factors in ERP Implementation: The Perspective of the Procurement System User2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 14.
    Atkacuna, Ilze
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Furlan, Karolina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Value-Added Services in Third-Party Logistics: A study from the TPL providers’ perspective about value-added service development, driving forces and barriers2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Competition in the logistics service industry has constantly increased over the last decades which has lead to the traditional services offered by third-party logistics (TPL) providers becoming commodities and no longer offering attractive profit margins. When the company’s core product becomes a commodity, the company’s performance of supplementary services becomes vital for competitive advantage. The term “value-added service” is defined as a service adding extra feature, form or functions to the basic service and stands for all types of activities which are not directly based on services traditionally offered by TPL providers, i.e., transportation and warehousing. The term value-added service is mainly used in the logistics literature while supplementary service is used in the service management literature. Although value-added services can offer obvious advantages in form of customer lock-in and improved competitive advantage, such services are still offered at a low level and there is much space for development.

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyse how TPL firms develop value-added services and to investigate what the driving forces and barriers for developing and providing such services are. In the frame of reference, literature within service management, outsourcing, third-party logistics, value-added services, innovation and learning have been used.

    In the thesis, an inductive research approach is used and qualitative study has been carried out by applying multiple case studies as a research strategy. The empirical material is gathered from three TPL providers: Bring Logistics Solutions, Aditro Logistics and Schenker Logistics. Data was collected through several interviews conducted at the three target companies and the findings have been analysed using the existing theory stated in the frame of reference.

    The main conclusions from analysing the development process of value-added services are that this process in most cases is initiated by customer request and that development of value-added service can occur both in the beginning or during an ongoing relationship, though a lack of information about a customer’s business in the beginning of the relationship can hinder the TPL provider to develop value-added services. Apart from the TPL provider and the customer, firms such as IT companies, transport suppliers and other companies can be involved in the development process. No formal innovation process is applied for developing value-added services. The main driving force behind value-added services is meeting customer demands. Lack of proactiveness from the TPL provider’s side can be a barrier for developing value-added services, as well as problems with achieving successful organizational learning. The difficulty for the TPL firm to coordinate offering so many different services can be also seen as a barrier.

  • 15.
    Awan, Ziyad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Rahman, Ziaur
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Supply chain designs for Humanitarian Relief2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the unpredictable nature of sudden onset disasters the humans are often caught with surprise so are the humanitarian relief organizations. In order to quickly react to the emergencies, supply chain networks are built instantly by the actors of the relief management. Parallel to this process, need assessment is started with the help of local experts which also confirm that the response cannot be lingered on due a delay in need assessment. After wards the supply chain structure needs to be changed once the right information is gathered by the passage of time. This is not all, actually the situation of the disaster prone area and people also changes by that time which always brings a challenging scenario for humanitarian relief actors to develop the supply chain design with flexibility.Primary focus of this paper is to define right supply chain designs for disaster response and post disaster phases in humanitarian relief.

  • 16.
    Ayongwa, Israel Ambe
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Sun, Jie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Overlapping humanitarian logistics roles and attaining a strategic fit in civil-military relations2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Humanitarian logistics is a young science and complex discipline compared to business logistics because not only are actors in that arena compelled to work with outmost speed in interrupted environments having undetermined demand, they are also forced to work closely with other unknown players. Even more complex are civil-military relations because as studies show, the differences between these two humanitarian actors run deep to include contrasting missions, humanitarian principles, organizational and cultural differences.

    The purpose of this work is to examine civil-military relations during the preparedness and response phases of humanitarian crises. We developed a frame of reference, set forth some operational and theoretical definitions, examined overlapping supply chains, modeled organizational structures and coordination mechanisms, established civil-military cooperation framework, disaster cycle studies and proposed a working model.

    Our methodology included primary data collection through an empirical study of two NGOs and the military force through a series of interviews. Data culled was then analyzed in conjunction with the models and literature outlined in the frame of reference.

    Based on our analysis, a number of observations were made in the conclusion. To begin with a number of strategies are employed during the preparedness and response phase where speed and agility are crucial. Also, overlapping roles between the military and NGOs have both positive and negative impact. Different organizational structures and funding outlay mean differences abound in how actors coordinate activities and share information. Cooperation, trust, information sharing and coordination are closely linked when finding a strategic fit among actors. In spite of the attempt at seeking a right formula for civil-military relations, it would be erroneous to ‘standardize’ relations as no two cases are ever the same.

  • 17.
    Balano, Janet
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Nachev, Nikolay
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Maintenance Repair Operations E-Procurement: A Multiple Case Studies on Small-Sized Companies in the Netherlands2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Bayer, Fabian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Bergmann, Jonas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    The Closed-Loop Endeavour: A Case Study on Barriers and Enhancements of the PET Bottle-to-Bottle Recycling Systems in Germany and Sweden2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: The demand of beverages in PET bottles is constantly increasing. In this context, environmental, technological and regulatory aspects set a stronger focus on recycling. Generally, the reuse of recycled material from post-consumer PET bottles in bottle-to-bottle applications is seen as least environmentally harmful. However, closed-loop systems are not widely implemented in Europe. Previous research mainly focuses on open-loop recycling systems and generally lacks discussion about the current German and Swedish systems and their challenges. Furthermore, previous studies lack theoretical and practical enhancements for bottle-to-bottle recycling from a managerial perspective.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the PET bottle recycling systems in Germany and Sweden, analyse the main barriers and develop enhancements for closed-loop systems.

    Method: This qualitative study employs a case study strategy about the two cases of Germany and Sweden. In total, 14 semi-structured interviews are conducted with respondents from different industry sectors within the PET bottle recycling systems. The empirical data is categorised and then analysed by pattern matching with the developed theoretical framework.

    Conclusion: Due to the theoretical and practical commitment to closed-loop recycling, the Swedish PET bottle recycling system outperforms the Germany system. In Germany, bottle-to-bottle recycling is currently performed on a smaller scale without a unified system. The main barriers for bottle-to-bottle recycling are distinguished into (1) quality and material factors, (2) regulatory and legal factors, (3) economic and market factors and (4) factors influenced by consumers. The enhancements for the systems are (1) quality and material factors, (2) regulatory and legal factors, (3) recollection factors and (4) expanding factors. Lastly, the authors provide further recommendations, which are (1) a recycling content symbol on bottle labels, (2) a council for bottle quality in Germany, (3) a quality seal for the holistic systems, (4) a reduction of transportation in Sweden and (5) an increase of consumer awareness on PET bottle consumption.

  • 19.
    Berger, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Garyfalakis, Emmanouil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Environmental Impact Assessment of road transportation: Analysis to measure environmental impacts of road transportation basedon a company case2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Activities, conducted in the logistics sector, contribute to pollute the world. Especially, road transportation contaminates the environment with the release of exhaust emissions. Transport volumes as well as the proportion of the road sector are constantly rising, which intensifies its environmental impacts. In order to determine the main culprits of pollution, Environmental Impact Analysis (EIA) are used. These concepts are mostly ambiguous, fuzzy and hard to present in a comprehensive way.

    The main purpose of the present thesis is to develop an analysis in order to investigate the environmental impacts of road transportation along a certain supply chain. An academic resource was used as database, in order to develop and test an exhauste mission calculation in cooperation with a case company.

    Besides CO2, this assessment also focuses on the measurement of other exhauste missions like Nox, PM or CO. Furthermore, economic factors like, costs caused per transport are calculated. Aspects, like capacity utilization, the use of environmentally friendly tires or eco-friendly driving styles, are included in the analysis. These factors influence fuel consumption and thus the final production of exhaust emissions. A detailed description of each factor and calculation step is illustrated in this thesis.

    Due to a high complexity of transportation, this analysis is limited to road transportation. The fundament of the analysis builds the categorization of crafts due to the Euro standards. Hence, just transports conducted with crafts, manufactured within the European Union, can be evaluated.

    A validation test and in-depth interviews were conducted in order to approve the practicability of the developed assessment. During this process, strengths and weaknesses of the analysis were identified. Finally, the analysis is critically examined by showing its application constraints as well as prospective development opportunities. An enlargement, to include other transport modes, material handling activities in order to measure impacts during intermodal transportation along a whole transportation chain, is a prospect outlook.

  • 20.
    Berger, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Garyfalakis, Emmanouil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Procurement policies in disaster relief: Analysis of sourcing practices applied by humanitarian organizations in the field of disaster response2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Disasters cause massive destruction and their occurrence (even though declining since the last years) is still a topic of high actuality. To mitigate their negative impacts, in particular humanitarian organizations put a lot of effort into helping nations and people to recover from disasters by providing relief commodities. Responding adequately to a disaster is difficult due to its highly complex and uncertain nature. Flexible but efficient supply chains are needed, which makes high demands on procurement operations. Within disaster relief logistics, procurement accounts for 65 % of total expenditures. Despite its significance, literature does not specifically focus on problems related to disaster relief procurement, which creates the need to examine this topic further, from theory as well as from practice.

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze sourcing policies, currently applied by the largest humanitarian organizations in the field of disaster relief.

    Method: This thesis conducted a descriptive and exploratory study of the literature in order to create a framework for a content analysis. During the content analysis, 108 officially published reports of the 14 biggest humanitarian organizations (concerning their annual budget) were investigated concerning their procurement policies in disaster response operations. Hence, this study uses a qualitative approach for a cross-sectional analysis of secondary data.

    Conclusions: The findings of this paper present an overview of currently applied procurement concepts in disaster response. The compilation of a comprehensive sourcing toolbox allows the classification of sourcing policies. The results show a tendency, that similar procurement policies are applied in the largest humanitarian organizations regarding the area of sourcing or the number of suppliers. A lack of awareness and/or transparency was discovered regarding environmentally friendly procurement policies. The application of ethical procurement (social factors) is however highly emphasized by the organizations. An unexpected discovery was the importance of long-term agreements and the frequent application of tendering processes for supplier selection. Further research opportunities lie in the field of demand tailored sourcing instead of pre-stocking to reduce inventory costs or in the comparison of sourcing practices applied in big and small organizations. To sum up, humanitarian organizations not only focus on quick deliveries, also quality and cost efficiency are increasingly paid attention in the field of disaster response procurement.

  • 21.
    Bergvall, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Gustavson, Christoffer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    The Economic Impact of Autonomous Vehicles in the Logistics Industry2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In an ever-changing industry where competition between actors is growing, technical improvements and investments can be a way to outperform competitors and gain competitiveadvantages. In a relatively under-developed industry, technological developments may leadto major improvements and change the layout of the whole business.

    Purpose – The main purpose of this thesis is to investigate potential cost reductions obtained by autonomous vehicles within the Swedish logistics industry. Studying opportunities for companies tostrengthen their competitive advantage can create new markets, chances or ensure a strongmarket position. To investigate said opportunities, the following research questions werestated:

    1. What is the actual cost of implementing an autonomous vehicle?
    2. Which costs will be affected by an implementation of autonomous vehicles?
    3. How do these costs impact the Swedish logistics market seen from a cost perspective?

    Method – The data necessary to answer the questions was collected from document studies, literature studies and interviews. These were carried out simultaneously in an iterativeprocess. Moreover, a pragmatic philosophy was undertaken, together with an abductive approach. The data was compared with existing theory by pattern matching and analysed withthematic approach, in order to ensure the level of trustworthiness.

    Findings/Implications – The findings of this thesis is that autonomous vehicles willheavily impact the logistics industry. By gradually implementing autonomous vehicles, theSwedish logistics sector can save upwards of 13,4 billion SEK between 2020 and 2030.This shift towards autonomous vehicles will move jobs from the long haul sector to urbanlogistics and telecommunications. Additionally, the society will see great benefits as 90% ofall traffic accidents will not happen when all vehicles are autonomous. It is clear that theSwedish logistics industry will benefit from an implementation of autonomous vehicles.Simultaneously it will also be beneficial for the society and the Swedish welfare.

    Limitations – The major limitation of this thesis is the time horizon. Because of being future oriented, much data was based on external estimations that might change over time.Moreover, only costs directly connected to transportations has been investigated, leavingroom for further studies related to indirect costs, as well as the organizational impacts onfuture supply chains.

  • 22.
    Bieringer, Alexandra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Müller, Linda
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Integration of Internet of Things technologies in warehouses: A multiple case study on how the Internet of Things technologies can efficiently be used in the warehousing processes2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 23.
    Boldt, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Patel, Gita
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Impact of Omni channel in a central warehouse: An analysis of warehouse activities for an electronic retailer2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact Omni channel has on the ware-house activities in a central warehouse for electronic retailers. In order to fulfill the purpose the following research questions are analyzed and answered; “What are the challenges in the warehouse activities in a central warehouse for an electronic retailer when Omni channel is utilized?” and “How can the challenges in the warehouse activities be managed in a central warehouse for an electronic retailer using Omni channel?”

    Methodology: The research method for this study is qualitative with an abductive approach. A single case study has been conducted based on interviews and observations. Furthermore, the literature review is based on scientific articles. The empirical findings from the case study have been a complement to the limited literature of warehouse activities connected to Omni channel. The analysis has required the authors to continuously match the empirical findings and literature in order to be able to fulfill the purpose. In order to analyze the answer the first research question an Ishikawa diagram is used. Furthermore, a tree diagram is used in order to analyze the answer for the second research question.

    Findings: There are various challenges identified in the warehouse activities in a central warehouse for electronic retailers using Omni channel. Furthermore, the authors identifies challenges that have an impact on the warehouse activities where Omni channel is the cause for creating the challenges. Lastly, the authors provide the reader with improvement factors in order to manage the challenges identified.

    Theoretical implications: The authors identify five theoretical implications for this study; large pallets, non-integrated WMS, a non-suitable picking equipment, a non-suitable layout, and packing. These challenges occur as an outcome of Omni channel and therefore can be seen as a theoretical contribution to the limited literature.

    Managerial implications: It is crucial for electronic retailers to identify the challenges in the warehouse activities and understand the underlying reason for why the challenges arise. Furthermore, improvement factors can be identified and implemented by an extended anal-ysis. However, modifications are required since there are various factors that can differ be-tween electronic retailers using Omni channel.

  • 24.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Does performance matter?: A strategic view of industrial networks2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Exploring efficiency and effectiveness in the supply chain: A conceptual analysis2005In: The 21st Annual IMP Conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Supply chain strategising: Integration in practice2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    The mystery of inter-organisational strategising2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    The mystery of strategy of practice2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).
    Towards a methodology for studying supply chain practice2012In: International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, ISSN 0960-0035, E-ISSN 1758-664X, Vol. 42, no 8/9, p. 843-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose is to describe and analyse a methodology for studying the practice of logistics and supply chain management (SCM), namely the mystery methodology.

    Design/methodology/approach – Many SCM and logistics researchers share methodological presuppositions concerning the ‘reality status’ that are usually unspoken and deviating from presuppositions of the methodology here investigated. By proposing an alternative methodology the paper stimulates further ideas that will advance the discussion of research methodologies in SCM.

    Findings – The methodology facilitates exploration and elaboration of anomalies in theory and in practice. The mystery construction process facilitates SCM research in three ways, (1) as a consistent methodology for practice research, (2) for learning and responsiveness to new insights and (3) with the problem of bounding the case.

    Research limitations/implications – The methodology is delimited by its constructivist/interpretivist assumptions, in order to provide accurate representations. But, it makes possible richer insights and meaning of SCM phenomena in which social action can be understood in an intelligible way.

    Practical implications – Construction of mysteries opens up for learning during the research process by refining the research question and the literature base. Under the assumption that the researcher is knowledgeable about the literature in a variety of areas, the methodology implies rigor and relevance in SCM research.

    Originality/value –This paper is grounded in contemporary supply chain integration problems and develops the discipline further with its alternative approach in which practice of action is in focus.

  • 30.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Agndal, Henrik
    Gothenburg University.
    Pereseina, Veronika
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    From product through service and solution to performance: Value propositions, interaction patterns and capabilities2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Andersson, Per
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    A rythmanalytic approach to understand the problematic nature of supply chain integration: The case of customer ordered  production strategy2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Arujo, Luis
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Who is the customer?: On the nature of customer representation in supply chains2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    From Global outsourcing/ sourcing to glocal or local2007In: Nofoma Proceeding Rejkavik, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 34.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Implications of offshoring: Co-development of sourcing and marketing2008In: Recent developments in supply chain management / [ed] René de Koster, Helsinki School of Economics and Business Administration , 2008, p. 41-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Fridriksson, Helgi Valur
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    What do we know about global supply chain development?: A review and a synthesis of the literature on supply chain management and international business2006In: Paper presented at the GCSCL 2006 International Conference on Greater China Supply Chain and Logistics, Hong Kong, December 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Challenges in customer order based production2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Challenges in customer order based production2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Enacting outsourcing: An innovation process perspective2010In: Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1995-5235, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research has been done on outsourcing. However, we still know little about outsourcing based on a social process view on innovation. Outsourcing is an innovation as a logistics-related process that is perceived as new by the adopter. We will explore and analyse an outsourcing idea, its development and implementation, from an innovation perspective. The development is studied in a qualitative, long-term process study. The analysis draws on Hoholm’s (2009) model of innovation processes. It extends the applicability of this innovation model and its methodology of following the action into logistics and supply chain management (SCM) research. The outsourcing process is an innovation that develops in a rational way based on the incremental process because of its actor-network and simultaneous reflection. Interactions and confrontations come about because of involved contrary forces such as competing objectives. The model explains the practice of SCM innovation and increases the understanding of dynamics and complexity. The process study brings insights to cause-effect relations in the development of outsourcing that are consequential to innovative logistics and SCM.

  • 39.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    ICT's Role for SMEs integration in supply chains - efficiency and effectiveness?2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Implications of supply chain monitoring2007In: Managing Supply Chains: Challenges and Opportunities, Frederiksberg: Copenhagen Business School Press , 2007, p. 27-58Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Kundorderstyrning: Ett förvånansvärt trubbigt verktyg2008In: Marknadsorientering: myter och möjligheter, Malmö: Liber , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kundorderstyrning är ett viktigt inslag i såväl industriell som kommersiell logik. I den industriella logiken är fokus på att effektivisera produktion och distribution till kunder. Den kommersiella logiken handlar om att bättre anpassa sig till kundens olika behov och att öka intäkterna. Allt fler aktiviteter i industrins förädlingskedjor kundorderstyrs för att öka kundorienteringen. Kundens krav på fler varianter och modeller har samtidigt medfört allt större komplexitet och svårigheter att prognostisera framtida efterfrågan.

    Problemen med kundorderstyrningen skiljer sig mellan olika industrier beroende på hur företagen i en förädlingskedja är integrerade och hur komplex produktionen är.

    I kapitlet identifieras flera sammanhang, där kundorderstyrningen sätts ur spel. Så utgör t ex är ägarnas påtryckningar för att förbättra kapacitetsutnyttjande, öka försäljningen och bonussystemens uppbyggnad ett dilemma för verksamheten.

  • 42.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Outsourcing as an innovation process: A critical evaluation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Power issues when integrating supply chains2006In: 22nd IMP-conference Milan, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Power issues when integrating supply chains2007In: Finanza Marketing e Produzione (Financing, Marketing and Production), ISSN 1593-2230, Vol. XXV, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Strategizing in industrial networks: Fallacies of customer order based production2008In: the 24th IMP-conference in Uppsala, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Supply chain strategies: Changes in customer order-based production2011In: Journal of Business Logistics, ISSN 0735-3766, E-ISSN 2158-1592, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 361-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply chain development is debated in terms of whether lean and agile supply chain strategies will work simultaneously and whether “leagile” strategies are possible. This study explores complexity and dynamics of the mixed strategy in a longitudinal automotive industry case study and contributes with four propositions related to the debate and practices of supply chain strategies.

  • 47.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Cui, Lianguang
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    A critical evaluation of service innovation processes2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Nyberg, Anna
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    A Market Driven Vs. A Market Driving Grocery Supply Chain: Problems And Opportunities With Integration2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
    Nyberg, Anna
    A tale of two entries - How Netto and Lidl entered the Swedish Grocery Market2007In: WIP IMP Conference in Manchester, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Borgström, Benedikte
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Nyberg, Anna
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Integrating the grocery supply chain: Problems and opportunities2008Conference paper (Other academic)
12345 1 - 50 of 238
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