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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science. University College of Kristianstad,Kristianstad.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Sense of coherence of reindeer herders and other Samis in comparison to other Swedish citizens2013In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 72, -20633 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Samis are indigenous people in north Europe. In the territory called Sa´pmi (Lapland), reindeer herding is the traditional base for the Sami economy. The relation between living conditions and positive health of the Swedish Samis has been sparsely studied. As health is closely linked to sense of coherence (SOC), an understanding of the background factors to SOC may contribute knowledge that might be useful in promoting living conditions and health.

    Methods. The study examines relations between the level of SOC and background factors from surveys in a Sami population (n=613) in comparison to a non-Sami population (n=525) in Sweden, and in comparison between 2 subsamples of Samis, that is, herders and non-herders.

    Results. There are more similarities than differences between the Sami and non-Sami populations. However, dividing the Sami population, reindeer herders had significantly lower SOC, and in specific the subcomponent manageability, that is, less ability to use available resources to meet different demands in life, compared to non-herders.

    Conclusions. In addition to age and health, predictors of SOC are related to the life form of reindeer husbandry and the belonging to the herding community

  • 2.
    Agren, Susanna
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden and Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden and Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery/THAI, Sk˚ane University Hospital and Medical Services, 221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    The Unsteady Mainstay of the Family: Now Adult Children's Retrospective View on Social Support in Relation to Their Parent's Heart Transplantation.2014In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs for support among children with a seriously ill parent, who is waiting for heart transplantation, are unknown today. The aim was to describe now adult children's experiences of social support in relation to a parent's heart transplant during childhood. Nine females and four males were interviewed. The median age for the children was 18 at the transplantation and their parents had been ill before for 18 months (median) and on waiting list for 161 days (mean). Three categories emerged: health care professionals' approaches, family and friends' approaches, and society approaches. Our results show that there was lack of support for children of heart transplantation patients. Support in the shape of information was in most cases provided by the sick or healthy parent. It is of great clinical importance to develop psychosocial support programs for children with a seriously ill parent waiting for heart transplantation (before, during, and after surgery).

  • 3.
    Ahldén, Maria KC
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Facing the unexpected - A content analysis of how dyads face the challenges of postoperative heart failure2014In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, Vol. 2, no 2, 74-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify the challenges, strategies and needs of dyads who are dealing with postoperative heart failure.

    Background: An increasing number of patients with postoperative heart failure are living with their partner as primary caregiver. Heart failure is known to reduce quality of life but little is known about the strategies dyads use to cope with postoperative heart failure or what kind of support they need.

    Methods: Data were collected through semi-structured dialogue guides. Content analysis was performed to derive the main themes and categories of the data.

    Results: Three main themes were derived from the data; Everyday challenges, Strategies to deal with everyday challenges and Factors facilitating everyday life.

    Conclusions: Dyads living with postoperative heart failure find the change in everyday life challenging, but have strategies to handle the situation and know what kind of help they need. With the right help from health care, quality of life and self-care can be improved.

  • 4.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Pain and its relation to participation in valued activities in rheumatoid arthritis2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a dramatic change over the past two decades for persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) not only due to early diagnosis, structured treatment, and aggressive medication but also due to an increased demand of participation in work life and society. Despite these treatment changes, RA continues to impact these individuals’ participation in valued daily activities. Participation in valued daily activities provides wellbeing and the opportunity for engagement and participation. By persons with RA pain has been highlighted as one of the most restrictive symptoms. This thesis uses the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a conceptual framework to describe disability and how participation is related to pain.

    Aims: The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and describe the relationship between pain and participation in valued activities, in RA. Paper I compared pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA with persons who were diagnosed ten years earlier. Paper II described experiences of pain and pain’s relationship with daily activities. Paper III examined difficulties performing valued life activities in relation to pain intensity. Paper IV described personal factors, including self-efficacy and pain acceptance, and studied whether personal factors are mediators of the relationbetween pain and performance of valued life activities.

    Methods: Different methodological approaches were used to provide a comprehensive understanding of pain and participation in valued activities in persons with RA. A prospective longitudinal cohort study was used to compare women and men treated with contemporary treated RA (n=276) with their counterparts ten years earlier (n=373) (Paper I). This study was followed by a focus group study where 33 persons with RA participated in seven focus groups (Paper II). Subsequently, Papers III and IV were conducted based on data from The Swedish Rheumatology Quality Registry (SRQ) and data from a postal questionnaire that gathered data on demographics, pain, personal factors, and participation in valued life activities (n=737). In addition, these studies used descriptive and analytical statistics with multiple regression and structural equation modelling (SEM).

    Results: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in women and men with RA despite recent treatment advances (Paper I). The relationship between participation and pain was dynamic and is related to fatigue, stress, and mood, factors that generated difficulties finding a suitable level of activity, resulting in difficulties balancing daily activities (Paper II). Both women and men reported restrictions in participation in valued life activities. Pain was identified as having an important relationship to difficulties performing valued life activities (Paper III). Personal factors were found important as mediators for pain in relation to participation (Paper IV).

    Conclusions: This thesis found a continued need for multidisciplinary interventions despite current treatments. Pain was identified as related to participation restrictions and had an important relationship to difficulties performing valued life activities. Pain and participation in valued activities needs to be comprehensively analysed and treated in the context of the person’s perspective and needs and demands of persons with RA. The subjective experience of participation, the engagement, must be highlighted. Personal factors mediated the relationship between pain and participation and this finding supports the value of self-management interventions to enable participation in valued activities

  • 5.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Linköping university.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping university.
    Low levels of pain impact on valued life activities in women and men with Rheumatoid Arthritis2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    AIR/Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Rehabilitation Medicine, IKE, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Pain and Daily Activities in Rheumatoid Arthritis2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 15, 1245-1253 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe experiences of pain and its relationship to daily activities in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Method. Seven semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with 33 men and women of different ages with RA. Data were analysed with content analysis. Results. Pain affected everyday life and may be a barrier to perform valued activities. Regarding the impact of pain on participation and independence, personal factors and the social environment were found to be important. It could be a struggle to find the right activity balance, since it was easy to be overactive, triggering subsequent elevation of pain levels. However, the participants also described activities as a mediator of pain and a distraction from it.Conclusion. The relationship between pain and daily activities in RA was complex. Pain as an impairment was expressed to be related to activity limitations and participation restrictions, as well as to contextual factors. These findings highlight the clinical importance of paying attention to the complexity of pain and its relation to daily activities and participation.

  • 7.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping university.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Smärta och dagliga aktiviteter vid Reumatoid artrit ur ett patientperspektiv2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Smärta vid Reumatoid artrit (RA) ärett välkänt symtom som orsakar lidande ochaktivitetsbegränsning. Traditionellt mäts smärtainom reumatologin som smärtintensitet på enVisuell Analog Skala (VAS). Kunskapen kring hurpatienter med RA upplever smärta och dess konsekvenser är begränsad. Patientens egenbeskrivning behövs som underlag för behandlingsplanering och för att utveckla nya metoderför att beskriva problematiken.Syfte: Syftet med studien är att beskriva smärtavid RA ur ett patientperspektiv med fokus på hursmärtan påverkar dagliga aktiviteter.Metod: Patienter med diagnostiserad RA i syd-östra Sverige identifierades via Svenska Reumatologiregistret. Urvalet baserades på minst 5 årssjukdomsduration och minst 40 mm smärtintensitet på VAS vid de två senaste besöken på reumatologklinik. Sammanlagt 33 patienter, 7 män och26 kvinnor, deltog i sju fokusgrupper. Gruppernaformades utifrån kön och ålder. Intervjuguideninnehöll frågor som: Hur beskriver patienter medRA sin smärta? Vad påverkar smärtan? Vilkakonsekvenser har smärtan för aktivitetsutförande,aktivitetsbalans och undvikande av aktivitet? Enkvalitativ innehållsanalys görs.Resultat/förväntat resultat: Analyser hittills visar patienternas frustration över att inteklara det man vill eller behöver göra, beroendeav andra, minskade möjligheter till delaktigheti sociala sammanhang. Och närståendes betydelse. Analyserna visar att smärtan är relaterad till Göteborg6-8 april 201134trötthet, stress och sinnesstämning och att arbeteeller andra aktiviteter medverkar till att glömmabort smärtan och uppehålla förmåga. Analysenslutförs under hösten.Konklusion: Denna studie förväntas genererany angelägen kunskap om och förståelse försmärta.

  • 8.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Pain and difficulties performing valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 34, no 8, 1353-1362 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine the difficulties with performing valued life activities in relation to pain intensity in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In total, 737 persons with RA (73 % women) from three rheumatology units in Sweden responded to a questionnaire measuring performance of 33 valued life activities and self-rated pain. The relationships between performance of valued life activities (VLAs) and pain (measured by visual analogue scale (VAS)) were analysed based on gender. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted with the total VLA score as dependent variable. Women reported more pain and difficulties in performing valued life activities than men. Across genders, 85 % reported at least one valued life activity affected by RA. Significantly more women than men encountered difficulties in performing some activities such as cooking, gardening and meeting new people. Women reported higher pain intensity (35 mm) than men (31 mm). Almost all 33 difficulty ratings for valued life activities were higher among persons with high pain (>40 mm) than persons with lower pain. Difficulty ratings for valued life activities correlated positively with pain in persons with lower pain, but not among those with high pain. The results highlight the importance of addressing pain, especially among women with RA, as they reported pain to impact on their valued life activities. Interestingly, this was evident also in women with lower levels of pain.

  • 9.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahlström, Ö
    Linköping University.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, 259-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier.

    METHOD: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years.

    RESULTS: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2.

    CONCLUSIONS: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 10.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Less pain and activity limitations in today's early RA patients compared with patients diagnosed 10 years earlier (the swedish TIRA-project)2014In: EULAR 2014: Scientific Abstracts, 2014, 141-142 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the last decades the RA-treatment strategies have changed considerably. Routines for early RA diagnosis and instituted disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have been established. In the early 2000s biologic agents also became available for treatment purposes. Despite these altered and improved strategies RA patients continue to report pain and activity limitations; women more so than men.

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the first three years after diagnosis of RA in today's patients compared with patients diagnosed 10 years earlier from a gender perspective.

    Methods: This study was based on patients recruited to the project “early interventions in RA” (TIRA). In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included during 1996-1998. In the second cohort (TIRA-2) 463 patients were included during 2006-2008. Disease activity score 28 joint count (DAS-28) and medication were registered. Pain intensity (VAS), bodily pain (BP) in Short Form36 (SF-36) and activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) were reported at inclusion and at follow-ups after one, two and three years.

    Results: Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion, but was significant lower at the follow ups in the TIRA-2 cohort compared with the TIRA-1 cohort. Patients in TIRA2 were prescribed traditional DMARD:s and biologic agents more frequent than in TIRA-1. The TIRA-2 patients reported significantly higher pain intensity and activity limitations at inclusion but lower pain intensity and activity limitations at all follow-ups than TIRA-1 patients. There were no significant differences between cohorts regarding bodily pain at inclusion, but thereafter the TIRA-2 patients showed significant lower bodily pain than the TIRA-1 patients. Men reported lower activity limitation than women in TIRA-1; otherwise there were no gender differences in TIRA-1. In TIRA-2, there were no significant gender differences regarding pain at inclusion. However, men reported lower pain than women at all follow-ups. Women, in turn, reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Pain and activity limitations were significantly reduced from inclusion to the one year follow-up but remained stable thereafter.

    Conclusions: Both women and men in today's early RA patient cohort report lower pain and less activity limitations at the follow ups after diagnosis of RA compared to 10 years earlier. However, both activity limitations and bodily pain are still pronounced.

  • 11.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rheumatology and Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, 824-834 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 12.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation Center and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Self-efficacy and painacceptance in relation to pain and performance of valued life activities inwomen and men with RAArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Aidemark, Jan
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Askenäs, Linda
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitet.
    Challenges for heart failure patients’ self-care systems – analysis of patients’ needs2014In: Procedia Technology - Elsevier, ISSN 2212-0173, E-ISSN 2212-0173, Vol. 16, 1256-1264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-care is important for heart failure patients. However, what are the views of patients on their situation when it comes to realizing self-care? The aim of the paper is to investigate the self-care needs of HF patients, by understanding the issues they embrace in their self-care processes. In this paper we make a review of 17 interviews and make a classification of what the needs are for possible information technology support systems. Based on the analysis of these interviews, we identify the diversity of needs in support of activities related to different background conditions and the dynamics of change of learning and changes in the heart failure condition. The contribution of the paper is a framework for understanding the diversity of needs and the specific situations of this group of patients.

  • 14.
    Aidemark, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Askenäs, Linda
    Linnaeus University.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Understanding heart failure care as a patient learning process2013In: Procedia Technology, ISSN 2212-0173, Vol. 9, 930-939 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with the planning of eHealth systems in the area of chronic care from a patient-centred perspective. The particular area is heart failure (HF) and systems that support patients’ possibilities to be active learners during the care processes. A better understanding of this process is hoped to create a basis for the development of appropriate information systems or information technology (IS/IT) support of learning processes. The objective of this paper is the development of a better understanding of the challenges of chronic illness with special focus on HF. The results are presented as a planning framework that guides the choice and design of ICT-based support systems.

  • 15.
    Al-Azawy, Mawahib
    et al.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Oterhals, Kjersti
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Assmus, Jörg
    Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Schuster, Peter
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Premedication and preoperative information reduces pain intensity and increases satisfaction in patients undergoing ablation for atrial fibrillation: A randomised controlled study2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, 268-273 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Pain and discomfort are common during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for atrial fibrillation.

    Aims

    To compare and evaluate the effect of premedication, standardised preoperative information and preoperative anxiety on pain intensity, drug consumption and patients’ satisfaction.

    Methods

    Preoperative anxiety at baseline, pain intensity during RFA, and patient satisfaction after the procedure were measured in 3 random groups. Group A (n = 20) received standard pain management, group B (n = 20) received premedication and group C (n = 20) received premedication and standardised preoperative information.

    Results

    Patients in groups B and C experienced less pain intensity (p < 0.001) and needed fewer anxiolytics (p = 0.023) and analgesics (p = 0.031) compared to group A. Patient satisfaction was higher in group C (p = 0.005) compared to group A. Increased preoperative anxiety is related to elevated drug demand (p < 0.05).

    Conclusion

    Premedication alone or combined with preoperative information reduces and higher preoperative anxiety increases pain intensity and drug consumption during RFA. Preoperative information improves patient satisfaction.

  • 16.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bostan, C
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Cieza, A
    A Multidisciplinary Cross-Cultural Measurement of Functioning After Stroke: Rasch Analysis of the Brief ICF Core Set for Stroke2011In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, Vol. 18, no 6, 573-586 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of constructing a multiprofessional cross-cultural measure of functioning after stroke across categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Method: Data on 757 stroke survivors from China, Germany, Italy, and Sweden, including ratings of 15 categories from the Brief ICF Core Set for stroke, were analyzed using the Rasch model. Unidimensionality, reliability, fit of the ICF categories to the model, ordering of response options of the ICF qualifier, and presence of differential item functioning (DIF) were studied. Results: Of the 15 ICF categories, response options for 7 categories were collapsed, 5 categories were deleted due to misfit, and 4 ICF categories showed DIF for country and were accordingly split into country-specific categories. The proposed final clinical measure consists of 20 ICF categories (6 categories were country-common) with an overall fit statistic of χ2180 = 184.87, P = .386, and a person separation index of r = 0.72, which indicates good reliability. Based on an individual's functioning after stroke, the ratings across the different ICF categories can be summed on an interval scale ranging from 0 to 100. Conclusion: A construction of a cross-cultural clinical measure after stroke based on ICF categories across body functions, structures, and activities and participation was possible. With this kind of clinical measure, stroke survivors' functional levels can be compared even across countries. Despite the promising results, further studies are necessary to develop definitive measures based on ICF categories.

  • 17.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany .
    Sunnehagen, Katharina S
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Factors Associated With Health-Related Quality of Life After Stroke: A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study2012In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, ISSN 1545-9683, E-ISSN 1552-6844, Vol. 26, no 3, 266-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In line with patient-centered health care, it is necessary to understand patients’ perceptions of health. How stroke survivors perceive their health at different time points after stroke and which factors are associated with these feelings provide important information about relevant rehabilitation targets. Objective. This study aimed to identify the independent factors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from a biopsychosocial perspective using the methods of multivariate regression at 3 different time points poststroke. Methods. Included in the study were 99 patients from stroke units with diagnosed first-ever stroke. At admission and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year poststroke, HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQoL-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS). Consequences in Body Functions and Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were documented using 155 categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Stroke. Results. For a period of 1 year, problems with recreation and leisure, personality functions, energy and drive functions, and gait pattern functions were repeatedly associated with worse HRQoL. Whereas Body Functions and Activities and Participation explained more than three-fourths of the variances of HRQoL at 6 weeks and 3 months (R 2 = 0.80-0.93), the variation at 1 year was best explained by either Body Functions or Environmental Factors (R 2 = 0.51). Conclusions. The results indicate the importance of Body Functions and Activities and Participation (mainly personality functions and recreation and leisure) on HRQoL within 3 months poststroke, but increased impact of Environmental Factors on HRQoL at 1 year.

  • 18.
    Almers, Ellen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences2017In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing forest gardens as urban settings for outdoor environmental education in Sweden is a new practice. These forest gardens combine qualities of a forest, e.g., multi-layered polyculture vegetation, with those of a school garden, such as accessibility and food production. The study explores both the perceived qualities of forest gardens in comparison to other outdoor settings and forest garden educators’ ideas, purposes, and experiences of activities in a three-year forest gardening project with primary school children. The data were collected through interviews and observations and analyzed qualitatively. Four reported ideas were to give children opportunities to: feel a sense of belonging to a whole; experience self-regulation and systemic dependence; experience that they can co-create with non-human organisms; and imagine possible transformation of places. Four pedagogical forest garden features are discussed.

  • 19.
    Amofah, H. A.
    et al.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Thoracic surgical unit, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Eide, L. S. P. E.
    Bergen University College, Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Haaverstad, R. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, K. O. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Clinical research, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, K. K. J. K.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Schjott, J. S.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, A. H. R.
    University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Norekval, T. M. N.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway .
    Factors associated with disturbances in sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after surgical aortic valve replacement2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, S63-S64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Disturbances of the sleep-wake pattern are known phenomenon in the postoperative phase after aortic valve replacement (SAVR) that have negative impact on the morbidity, quality of life and mortality. Octogenarian patients are an increasing group admitted for cardiac surgery, however knowledge is based on younger patients.

    Aims: To determine factors associated with disturbances in postoperative sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients after SAVR.

    Methods: A prospective cohort study of octogenarian patients in a single center university hospital. Inclusion criteria were age > 80 years, severe aortic stenosis, accepted for SAVR. Actigraphy was used to identify the sleep-wake pattern (sleep-time, sleep efficiency and wake time night and sleep- and wake-time day) for the five first postoperative days, and the sleep questionnaires Minimal Insomnia Symptom scale (MISS) to measure the selfreported insomnia at baseline and daily for the five first postoperative days. 

    Charlsons comorbidity index was used to score comorbidities and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), was used to rate pain severity. The patients’ medical journals were used to record duration of anesthesia, duration of cardiopulmonary by-pass, blood transfusions and parenteral administration of morphine equivalents. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations between variables.

    Results: In all, 78 patients were included (40 women). Mean age was 82 years (SD 2.0). For the sleep-wake pattern first to fifth postoperative night, mean sleep-time night was 330-370 minutes (SD 32-124). Mean sleep efficiency was 68-77% (SD 21-26). Mean sleep-time day was 545-712 minutes (SD 146-169). Mean insomnia score was 1,8-5,3 (SD 2,6-3,8). On the first postoperative night the pain VAS score correlated with wake time night, where a higher VAS indicated more wake time (p=.014, adjusted R2=.213). No other variable; age, gender, duration of anesthesia, duration of cardiopulmonary by-pass, blood transfusion or morphine equivalents showed significant association with the sleep-wake pattern or insomnia.

    Conclusion: Postoperative pain was associated with disturbances in sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after SAVR. This indicates that pain management may be inadequate for patients after SAVR. More research on this issue is needed to establish data needed to improve treatment and care.

  • 20.
    Amofah, Hege A.
    et al.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Bergen University College, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Bjorvatn, Bjørn
    Norwegian Competence Centre for Sleep Disorders, Bergen, Norway.
    Haaverstad, Rune
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, Karl Ove
    Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, Karel K. J.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, Anette H.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Norekvål, Tone M.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Sleep in octogenarians during the postoperative phase after transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, 168-177 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis are an increasing population of patients admitted for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although adequate sleep is important after illness and surgery, it has scarcely been studied in the immediate postoperative phase.

    Aims: To determine and compare the nature of self-reported sleep and insomnia, and recorded sleep–wake patterns in octogenarians during the in-hospital postoperative phase after SAVR or TAVI.

    Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included octogenarian patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI at a regional university hospital. Self-reports were used to document sleep and insomnia, and actigraphy was used to record sleep–wake patterns. Data were collected at baseline preoperatively, and then daily for the first five postoperative days.

    Results: SAVR patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights later in recovery, while TAVI patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights early in recovery. The median total sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, was 6.4 h, and the median sleep efficiency was 79% for the five postoperative nights, but no differences were found between SAVR and TAVI patients on this parameter. All patients slept more during daytime than at night, with SAVR patients having significantly more total sleep hours for all five days than TAVI patients (p < 0.01).

    Conclusion: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis had disturbed self-reported sleep, increased insomnia, and disturbed sleep–wake patterns postoperatively, resulting in more daytime sleep and inactivity. In patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI, sleep evolves differently during the in-hospital postoperative phase.

  • 21. Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The male partners' experiences of the intimate relationships after a first myocardial infarction2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 2, 108-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stress in the intimate relationship is found to worsen the prognosis in women suffering from myocardial infarction (MI). Little is known about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship.

    Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the experience of men's intimate relationships in connection to and after their female partner's first MI.

    Methods: An explorative and qualitative design was used. Interviews were conducted with 16 men having a partner who the year before had suffered a first MI. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes emerged: masculine image challenged; life takes another direction; and life remains unchanged. The men were forced to deal with an altered image of themselves as men, and as sexual beings. They were hesitant to approach their spouse in the same way as before the MI because they viewed her to be more fragile. The event also caused them to consider their own lifestyle, changing towards healthier dietary and exercise habits.

    Conclusions: After their spouse's MI, men experienced a challenge to their masculine image. They viewed their spouse as being more fragile, which led the men to be gentler in sexual intimacy and more hesitant to invite sexual activity. This knowledge about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship could be helpful for health personnel in hospitals and primary care when they interact with couples where the woman suffers from cardiac disease or other chronic disorders.

  • 22. Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11/12, 1677-1684 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed to explore and describe women’s experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner’s first myocardial infarction (MI).

    Background. Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners’ experience of intimate relationships after MI.

    Design. The study used an explorative, qualitative design.

    Methods. The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first MI during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Findings. Three themes emerged: ‘limited life space’, ‘sense of life lost’ and ‘another dimension of life’. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: ‘uncertainty of life’, ‘certain of relationship’ and ‘share life more’.

    Conclusions. The partners’ MI had an impact on the interviewees’ intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their ‘former’ partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners’ lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following MI.

  • 23.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU-centrum Spenshult.
    Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, no 102, -13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions.

    Results: Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure.

    Conclusions: This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies.

  • 24.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU-centrum Spenshult.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköpings universitet.
    Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning program as reported by people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled pilot study2011In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning (PBL) program for people with rheumatic diseases, in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQL), empowerment and self-care ability at a six month follow-up.

    Methods: A randomized controlled design was selected with pre-test, one-week and six months post-test after the one-year PBL-program. The participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n=54) or the control group (n=148). The differences were analyzed by t-test and Pearson Chi-square.

    Results: The participants in the experimental group had stronger empowerment after participation in the PBL-program compared with the control group. There were no differences in HRQL, self-care ability, sense of coherence, pain, quality of sleep or fatigue between the groups. The participants in the experimental group stated they had implemented lifestyle changes they had not done without the PBL-program.

    Conclusion: The present self-care promoting PBL-program enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment but not their HRQL and self-care ability compared with the control group.

    Practice Implications: It is important to continue to develop PBL in patient education in order to find the very best way to use this pedagogical model in rheumatology care. 

  • 25.
    Arvidsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    The Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, 1500-1514 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme for people with rheumatic diseases in terms of health-related quality of life, empowerment, and self-care ability.

    Background

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis express a great need for education and support in adapting to the disease, but the average qualities of studies about patient education interventions are not high. There is no evidence of long-term benefits of patient education.

    Design

    Randomized controlled trial.

    Methods

    A randomized controlled design was selected with test at baseline, 1-week and 6-month post-interventions after completed the 1-year programme. The tests consisted of validity and reliability tested instruments. The participants were randomly assigned in spring 2009 to either the experimental group (n = 54) or the control group (n = 148). The programme was running alongside the standard care the participants received at a rheumatology unit. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in the analyses.

    Results

    The participants in the experimental group had statistically significant stronger empowerment after participation in the self-care promoting problem-based learning programme compared with the control group, at the 6-month post-intervention. Approximately, two-thirds of the participants in the experimental group stated that they had implemented lifestyle changes due to the programme.

    Conclusion

    The self-care promoting problem-based learning programme enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment compared with the control group. It is important to continue to develop problem-based learning in patient education to find the very best way to use this pedagogical method in rheumatology care.

  • 26.
    Arvidsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tingström, Pia
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-232012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 2, 101-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Empowerment is a central concept in both rheumatology and diabetes care. A Swedish empowerment instrument for patients with rheumatic diseases has not been created before now. The aim of the present study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-23, such as construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-item correlations and discriminant validity.

    METHODS: The already existing instrument, the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale (SWE-DES-23), was adapted for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The adapted instrument was called the SWE-RES-23. In 2009, 260 patients with rheumatic diseases from a rheumatology unit in Sweden completed the instrument. Construct validity was tested by using exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency reliability was tested by the use of Cronbach's α-coefficient. In order to determine unidimensionality of the empowerment subscales, inter-item correlations were calculated. To establish discriminant validity, an item about self-perceived health from the Short Form (SF) 36 was used in addition to the SWE-RES-23.

    RESULTS: The exploratory factor analysis resulted in five factors (empowerment subscales) with eigenvalues >1, explaining 64.1% of the total variance: Goal achievement and overcoming barriers to goal achievement; Self-knowledge; Managing stress; Assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change; and Support for caring. Cronbach's α values ranged from 0.59 to 0.91, and the value for the total score was 0.92.

    CONCLUSION: The results support the possibility of adapting the SWE-DES-23 for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The SWE-RES-23 shows acceptable psychometric properties, in terms of construct validity and internal consistency reliability. To validate the SWE-RES-23 fully, further studies are needed, with a focus on test-retest correlations.

  • 27.
    Astin, Felicity
    et al.
    University of Salford.
    Carroll, Diane
    Massachusetts General Hosital,.
    De Geest, Sabina
    Kathlieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Education for nurses working in cardiovascular care: A European survey2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 6, 532-540 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses represent the largest sector of the workforce caring for people with cardiovascular disease in Europe. Little is known about the post-registration education provided to nurses working within this specialty. The aim of this descriptive cross sectional survey was to describe the structure, content, teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation methods used in post-registration cardiovascular nurse education programmes in Europe.

    Method: A 24-item researcher generated electronic questionnaire was sent to nurse representatives from 23 European countries. Items included questions about cardiovascular registered nurse education programmes.

    Results: Forty-nine respondents from 17 European countries completed questionnaires. Respondents were typically female (74%) and educated at Masters (50%) or doctoral (39%) level. Fifty-one percent of the cardiovascular nursing education programmes were offered by universities either at bachelor or masters level. The most frequently reported programme content included cardiac arrhythmias (93%), heart failure (85%) and ischaemic heart disease (83%). The most common teaching mode was face-to-face lectures (85%) and/or seminars (77%). A variety of assessment methods were used with an exam or knowledge test being the most frequent. Programme evaluation was typically conducted through student feedback (95%).

    Conclusion: There is variability in the content, teaching, learning and evaluation methods in post-registration cardiovascular nurse education programmes in Europe. Cardiovascular nurse education would be strengthened with a stronger focus upon content that reflects current health challenges faced in Europe. A broader view of cardiovascular disease to include stroke and peripheral vascular disease is recommended with greater emphasis on prevention, rehabilitation and the impact of health inequalities.

  • 28.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Forslind, Kristina
    Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Thomé, Bibbi
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis: A BARFOT study2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, 2646-2656 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective: To describe and understand the meaning of living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis.

    Background: A considerable number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis live with an ongoing active and symptomatic illness despite access to potent antirheumatic treatment. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about the meaning of living with this severe long-term illness, defined as persistent rheumatoid arthritis.

    Design: A descriptive design based on a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used.

    Methods: Ten adults with persistent rheumatoid arthritis and at least five years disease duration were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to van Manen's method.

    Results: Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis revealed four overall themes: an existence dominated by painful symptoms and treatment, radical changes and limitations in one's life, a continual struggle to cope with one's life and to master the illness, and a dependency on those who are close by and the world around. The lifeworld was affected to a varying extent and in various ways by the illness but also by the dependence on its treatment and care that was not experienced as sufficiently meeting needs in terms of security, access to and coordination of care as well as team and rehabilitation services.

    Conclusions: Persistent rheumatoid arthritis and its treatment entail a radical effect on the person's life and quality of life. Current ordinary rheumatology care does not seem to meet the individual needs of the person with persistent rheumatoid arthritis in an optimal way.

    Relevance to clinical practice: A greater knowledge about and understanding of the person who lives with persistent rheumatoid arthritis is important for facilitating the development of care and the relief of suffering. A holistic alternative to conventional clinical practice, such as person-centred care, could be tested as an innovative model of care. Our findings might serve as material for educational and counselling purposes for healthcare professionals. 

  • 29.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hesselgård, Karin
    Corporate office, Skåne Regional Council, Malmö, Sweden.
    The experience of care at nurse-led rheumatology clinics2012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 4, 202-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe how people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience the care provided by Swedish nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    METHODS: Eighteen adult people with a diagnosis of RA who had had at least three documented contact sessions with a nurse-led clinic were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Care was expressed in three categories: social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures. A social environment including a warm encounter, a familial atmosphere and pleasant premises was desired and contributed to a positive experience of care. The nurses' professional approach was experienced as empathy, knowledge and skill, as well as support. The care was described as person centred and competent, as it was based on the individual's unique experience of his/her disease and needs. The nurses' specialist knowledge of rheumatology and rheumatology care was highly valued. The offered care represented added value for the participants, instilling security, trust, hope and confidence. It was perceived as facilitating daily life and creating positive emotions. The nurse-led clinics were reported to be easily accessible and provided continuity of the care. These features were presented as fundamental guarantees for health care safety.

    CONCLUSION: The experiences emphasized the need for a holistic approach to care. In this process, the organization of care and the role and skills of the nurse should be focused on the individual's needs and perspectives. The social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures are particularly relevant for optimal care at nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics.

  • 30. Barnett, C. T.
    et al.
    Vanicek, N.
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    A longitudinal analysis of the relationships between postural control, falls efficacy and falling in unilateral transtibial prosthesis users2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Barnett, Cleveland T.
    et al.
    Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
    Vanicek, Natalie
    University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Does postural control predict falling and the fear of falling in lower limb amputees?2015In: ISPO World Congress 2015: Abstract book, 2015, 279- p., 313Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32. Berben, L
    et al.
    Bogert, L
    Leventhal, ME
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Jaarsma, T
    Norekvål, TM
    Smith, K
    Strömberg, A
    Thompson, DR
    De Geest, S
    Which interventions are used by healthcare professionals to enhance medication adherence in cardiovascular patients?: A survey of current clinical practice2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 1, 14-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Complex medication regimens are often required to manage cardiovascular diseases. As non-adherence, which can have severe negative outcomes, is common among cardiovascular patients, various interventions to improve adherence should be implemented in daily practice.

    Aim To assess which strategies cardiovascular nurses and allied health professionals utilize to (1) assess patients' adherence to medication regimen, and (2) enhance medication adherence via educational/cognitive, counseling/behavioral, and psychological/affective interventions.

    Method A 45-item questionnaire to assess adherence assessment and interventional strategies utilized by health care professionals in daily clinical practice was distributed to a convenience sample of attendants of the 10th Annual Spring Meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions conference in Geneva (Switzerland) in March 2010. Respondents not in direct clinical practice were excluded. Descriptive statistics were used to describe practice patterns regarding adherence management.

    Results Of 276 distributed questionnaires, 171 (62%) were returned, of which 34 (20%) were excluded as respondents performed no direct patient care. Questioning patients about non-adherence during follow-up was the most frequently reported assessment strategy (56%). Educational/cognitive adherence enhancing interventions were used most frequently, followed by counseling/behavioral interventions. Psychological/affective interventions were less frequently used. The most frequent intervention used was providing reading materials (66%) followed by training patients regarding medication taking during inpatient recovery (48%). Slightly over two-thirds (69%) reported using a combination of interventions to improve patient's adherence.

    Conclusion Educational interventions are used most in clinical practice, although evidence shows they are less effective than behavioral interventions at enhancing medication adherence.

  • 33.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, S
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Alfredsson, L
    Berglund, A
    Arvidsson, B
    Petersson, IF
    Patterns of background factors related to early RA patients' conceptions of the causes of their disease2011In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 30, no 3, 347-352 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify patterns of background factors related to the early RA patients' conceptions of the cause of the disease. Conceptions from a qualitative study formed the basis for the stratification of 785 patients from the Swedish EIRA study answering a question about their own thoughts about the cause to RA. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the associations between patients' conceptions and relevant background factors: sex, age, civil status, educational level, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) and smoking habits. The results were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A conception of family-related strain was strongly associated with being young (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33-0.78 for age 58-70 vs. 17-46), female (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25-0.60 for male vs. female) and having a high level of education (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.54-3.01 for university degree vs. no degree). A conception of being exposed to climate changes was associated with being male (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.24-3.22 for male vs. female), having a low level of education (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.58 for university degree vs. no degree) and positive Anti-CCP (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.03-2.87 for positive vs. negative Anti-CCP). Linking patients' conceptions of the cause of their RA to background factors potentially could create new opportunities for understanding the complexity of the aetiology in RA. Furthermore, this information is important and relevant in the care of patients with early RA.

  • 34.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    "Delivering knowledge and advice": Healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients' management of rheumatoid arthritis.2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, -9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and involve a lifetime of suffering. The focus of rheumatology care is to support patients to manage their lives and master their disease. Healthcare providers and patients have different views on the consequences of living with rheumatic diseases and patients are reporting unmet healthcare needs. There is a need to integrate providers' perspective to develop the quality of rheumatology care. The aim was to explore healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients in their management of RA. Interviews with 18 providers from different clinical settings were analysed in accordance with the grounded theory method. A core category; Delivering knowledge and advice was found to be the most important task and involved providing the patient with information about the disease and appropriate forms of treatment. Healthcare providers' attitudes and patients' responses influenced the outcome of the delivery of knowledge and advice and three dimensions emerged; completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. There were differences in the providers' experiences in their interaction with patients as well as in reflections on their role as the delivering part. There could be difficulties in the interaction when patients' expectations and preferences were not taken into account when giving advice. These findings highlight the importance of developing rheumatology care, as no provider or patient benefits if the delivery of knowledge and advice becomes a failed delivery. The healthcare organization must acknowledge the difficulties involved in the interaction with patients in their management of RA and find methods to develop a more person-centred approach to care.

  • 35.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    “Striving for a Good Life”: The Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis as Experienced by Patients2011In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 5, 95-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To generate a theoretical model how patients experience their management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in everyday life.Method: An explorative design with the grounded theory approach was used by interviewing 16 informants with RA.Results: The generated theoretical model emerged in a core category- Striving for a good life with two categories; making use of personal resources and grasping for support from others, which formed the base of managing RA. When relating these categories together, four dimensions emerged which characterised patients’ different ways of managing RA: mastering, relying, struggling and being resigned.Discussion: The management of RA incorporated the use of personal resources and the grasping for support from others. Both self-management strategies and patients’ need of support were highlighted as aspects that were of importance when managing RA. Patients’ experiences of their need of support to manage RA give extended knowledge that is of importance for nurses and other healthcare providers. The relationship between patients and healthcare providers is always the key to a good encounter. Interventions to increase self-management in RA have to incorporate this knowledge when trying to increase patients’ self-efficacy and with their experience of support

  • 36.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    ‘Like the worst toothache you’ve had’ – How people with rheumatoid arthritis describe and manage pain2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 6, 468-476 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease often associated with disability. Despite new treatments, pain and activity limitations are still present.

    Objectives: To describe how persons with RA experience and manage pain in their daily life.

    Methods: Seven semi-structured focus groups (FGs) were conducted and analyzed using content analysis.

    Results: The analysis revealed four categories: 1) Pain expresses itself in different ways referred to pain as overwhelming, aching or as a feeling of stiffness. 2) Mitigating pain referred to the use of heat, cold, medications and activities as distractions from the pain. 3) Adapting to pain referred to strategies employed as coping mechanisms for the pain, e.g. planning and adjustment of daily activities, and use of assistive devices. 4) Pain in a social context referred to the participants’ social environment as being both supportive and uncomprehending, the latter causing patients to hide their pain.

    Conclusions: Pain in RA is experienced in different ways. This emphasizes the multi-professional team to address this spectrum of experiences and to find pain management directed to the individual experience that also include the person’s social environment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-01-05 00:00
  • 37.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nystedt, Paul
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change (SCOHOS).
    Education level explains participation in work and education later in life2017In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 43, no 10, 511-521 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prolonged working life is crucial for sustaining social welfare and fiscal stability for countries facing ageing populations. The group of older adults is not homogeneous; however, differences within the group may affect the propensity to continue working and to participate in continuing education. The aim of this paper is to explore how participation in work and education vary with gender, age, and education level in a sample of older adults. The study was performed in Sweden, a context characterized by high female labour-market-participation rates and a high average retirement age. The participants were 232 members of four of the major senior citizens? organizations. We found no differences in participation in work and education based on gender. People older than 75 years were found to be as active as people 65?75 years old in education, but the older group worked less. There were positive associations between education level and participation in both work and education. Hence, this study implies that socio-economic inequalities along these dimensions are widened later in life. This highlights the importance of engaging workers with lower education levels in educational efforts throughout life. It also emphasizes the need for true lifelong learning in society.

  • 38.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Trupin, L
    University of California, USA.
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Katz, P.
    University of California, USA.
    Yelin, E.
    University of California, USA.
    Differences in activity limitation, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden and the USA: a 5-year follow-up2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 40, no 6, 428-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study we compared activity limitations, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden and the USA and aimed to determine whether nationality is associated with these outcomes.

    Methods: We used longitudinal data from the 'Swedish TIRA project' (n = 149) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) RA panel study (n = 85). Data were collected annually concerning use of medications [disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologics, and corticosteroids], morning stiffness, number of swollen joints, and number of painful joints. Three self-reported outcome measures were examined: pain intensity measured on a 0-100 visual analogue scale (VAS), activity limitation according to the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and global health. To analyse the data, the Student's t-test, the χ(2)-test, and the generalized estimating equation (GEE) method were used.

    Results: Nationality was significantly related to HAQ score and pain intensity, even after adjustment for covariates. The patients in the TIRA cohort reported a lower HAQ score and a higher pain intensity than the patients in the UCSF cohort. Nationality was not related to global health.

    Conclusion: Patients with RA should be assessed with awareness of the psychosocial and cultural context because disability seems to be affected by nationality. Further knowledge to clarify how a multinational setting affects disability could improve the translation of interventions for patients with RA across nationalities.

  • 39.
    Blomdahl, Christina
    et al.
    Institute Care and Health Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Birgitta A.
    Institute Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Guregård, Suzanne
    Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Borås, Sweden.
    Rusner, Marie
    Institute Care and Health Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wijk, Helle
    Institute Care and Health Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Art therapy for patients with depression: expert opinions on its main aspects for clinical practice2016In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 25, no 6, 527-535 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Art therapy is based mainly on clinical experience and is rarely described and evaluated scientifically. There is a need for further exploration of its use in patients with depression.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore what experts consider to be the main aspects of art therapy in clinical practice for patients with depression.

    Method: Eighteen occupational therapists experienced and educated in art therapy participated. The experts answered three rounds of Delphi questionnaires and ranked their agreement with 74 assertions. Consensus was defined as 70% or higher.

    Results: The experts agreed more on assertions about theoretical frames of reference than about clinical practice. The main aspects of art therapy were agreed to be the patients’ opportunity to express themselves verbally and through making art. It was equally important that art tasks provided an opportunity to address depressive thoughts, feelings, life experiences, and physical symptoms.

    Conclusions: Experts in the field of art therapy considered that the main aspect of clinical practice in art therapy for patients with depression is that art themes should promote expression related to both to depression and personal history.

  • 40.
    Blomdahl, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Gunnarsson, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Fou Växjö.
    Guregård, Suzanne
    Södra Älvsborgs sjukhus.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    A realist review of art therapy for clients with depression2013In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 40, no 3, 322-330 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is a serious disease affecting an individual's entire life-situation, which can lead to great suffering and a reduced level of activity in everyday life. The aim of this study is to explore and describe how art therapy works regarding therapeutic factors, application, and circumstances for clients with depression. A systematic literature search of relevant databases was carried out to find articles concerning art therapy for depression, meeting criteria for reproducibility. This yielded 16 articles published in seven journals. The art therapy methods employed in each selected study were then examined and compared in order to understand the healing mechanism or mechanisms. These healing mechanisms are here termed “therapeutic factors”. The analysis resulted in eight therapeutic factors; self-exploration, self-expression, communication, understanding and explanation, integration, symbolic thinking, creativity, and sensory stimulation. No general conclusions could be drawn regarding circumstances, but the results indicate that art therapy can be performed successfully in a wide variety of clinical situations. The results were discussed in relation to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core sets for depression.

  • 41.
    Borgh, Madeleine
    et al.
    Iris Hadar Limited company, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eek, Frida
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Organisational factors and occupational balance in working parents in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Parents with small children constitute a vulnerable group as they have an increased risk of sick leave due to stress-related disorders compared to adults without children. It has been shown that mothers and fathers to small children together spend more time in paid work than any other group, which could create negative stress and an experience of low occupational balance.

    Aim:

    The aim of this study was to examine associations between organisational factors and occupational balance among parents with small children in Sweden.

    Methods:

    Data were collected by a survey including questions about occupational balance, organisational factors and age, sex, employment rate, work position, monthly household income, number of children at home, separation/divorce last five years and overtime. The total number of parents included in this study was 718 (490 mothers and 228 fathers). Logistic regression models were applied to examine the odds ratios for occupational balance in relation to organisational factors.

    Results:

    Parents who experienced positive attitudes towards parenthood and parental leave among colleagues and managers were more likely to experience high occupational balance than parents who experienced negative or neutral attitudes. Having a clear structure for handover when absent from work was also strongly associated with high occupational balance.

    Conclusions:

    The result of the present study indicates that some organisational factors could be important for the occupational balance of parents with small children.

  • 42.
    Boström, Martina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    How older people perceive and experience sense of security when moving into and living in a nursing home2016In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sense of security is important throughout the lifespan not at least in advanced age with increased risks of functional declines and decreased social capital. Despite this, knowledge concerning older person’s perceptions and experiences of sense of security when moving into nursing homes is scarce. This study is a longitudinal, descriptive, exploratory case study with in-depth interviews and observations of three older persons in the age of 87, 88, and 91 years in a mid-sized municipality in the south of Sweden, in order to highlight how sense of security is experienced when moving into and living in a nursing home. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, which resulted in one main theme and four categories. The main theme, ‘Adaptation and sense of security’, indicates older persons’ need to adapt to the new context of the nursing home, and how this relates to their sense of security. The categories – ‘Control’, ‘Struggling for understanding’, ‘Lack of influence’, and ‘Grasping’ – suggest that older persons’ sense of security is reduced when they must adjust to routines without sufficient management and understanding. When able to maintain control over daily routines, and felt as a part of the new context, they perceived a sense of security.

  • 43.
    Bouillon, Kim
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hamer, Mark
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Sabia, Severine
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Gale, Catharine R.
    MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Batty, G. David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Measures of frailty in population-based studies: An overview2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although research productivity in the field of frailty has risen exponentially in recent years, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the measurement of this syndrome. This overview offers three services: first, we provide a comprehensive catalogue of current frailty measures; second, we evaluate their reliability and validity; third, we report on their popularity of use.

    Methods: In order to identify relevant publications, we searched MEDLINE (from its inception in 1948 to May 2011); scrutinized the reference sections of the retrieved articles; and consulted our own files. An indicator of the frequency of use of each frailty instrument was based on the number of times it had been utilized by investigators other than the originators.

    Results: Of the initially retrieved 2,166 papers, 27 original articles described separate frailty scales. The number (range: 1 to 38) and type of items (range of domains: physical functioning, disability, disease, sensory impairment, cognition, nutrition, mood, and social support) included in the frailty instruments varied widely. Reliability and validity had been examined in only 26% (7/27) of the instruments. The predictive validity of these scales for mortality varied: for instance, hazard ratios/odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for mortality risk for frail relative to non-frail people ranged from 1.21 (0.78; 1.87) to 6.03 (3.00; 12.08) for the Phenotype of Frailty and 1.57 (1.41; 1.74) to 10.53 (7.06; 15.70) for the Frailty Index. Among the 150 papers which we found to have used at least one of the 27 frailty instruments, 69% (n = 104) reported on the Phenotype of Frailty, 12% (n = 18) on the Frailty Index, and 19% (n = 28) on one of the remaining 25 instruments.

    Conclusions: Although there are numerous frailty scales currently in use, reliability and validity have rarely been examined. The most evaluated and frequently used measure is the Phenotype of Frailty.

  • 44.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum – Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, Linköping University Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Sweden.
    Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 3-4, 568-577 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated.

    Background: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence.

    Methods: A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patient's perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted.

    Results: Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patient's perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end.

    Conclusions: Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel.

    Relevance to clinical practice: A patient-centred communication technique should be used in relation to all stages of The 4 Habits Model to facilitate shared decision-making and improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 45.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Institution of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Division of Social Medicine and Public Health Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health and Society, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    A mixed method evaluation of a group-based educational programme for CPAP use in patients with obstructive sleep apnea2013In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 19, no 1, 173-184 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives  Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has a low long-term adherence. Educational interventions are few and sparsely described regarding content, pedagogical approach and participants' perceptions. The aim was to describe adherence to CPAP treatment, knowledge about OSA/CPAP, as well as OSA patients' perceptions of participating in a group-based programme using problem-based learning (PBL) for CPAP initiation.

    Educational programme  The PBL programme incorporated elements from theories and models concerning motivation and habits. Tutorial groups consisting of four to eight patients met at six sessions during 6 months.

    Methods  A sequential explanatory mixed method design was used on 25 strategically selected patients. Quantitative data regarding, clinical variables, OSA severity, CPAP use, and knowledge were collected at baseline, after 2 weeks and 6 months. Qualitative data regarding patients' perceptions of participation were collected after 6 months by semi-structured interviews using a phenomenographic approach.

    Results  72% of the patients were adherent to CPAP treatment after 2 weeks and 6 months. All patients improved their baseline knowledge about OSA and CPAP after 2 weeks and sustained it after 6 months. Anxiety and fear, as well as difficulties and needs were motivational factors for participation. Patients described the difficulties of behavioural change, an awareness that improvements do not occur immediately, a realization of the importance of both technical and emotional support and the need for a healthier lifestyle.

    Conclusion and practice implications  A group-based programme using PBL seems to facilitate adaptive and developmental learning and result in acceptable CPAP adherence levels.

  • 46.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nilsen, Per
    Division of Health Care Analysis, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health and Society, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Validation of the CPAP Habit Index-5: A Tool to Understand Adherence to CPAP Treatment in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea2014In: Sleep Disorders, ISSN 2090-3545, E-ISSN 2090-3553, no 929057, 1-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is low among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The potential role of "habit" in sustaining adherence to CPAP use has not been studied. This study aimed to establish the relevance of habit to CPAP adherence, via validation of an adaptation of the Self-Report Habit Index (the CPAP Habit Index-5; CHI-5). Analyses focused on the homogeneity, reliability, and factor structure of the CHI-5 and, in line with theoretical predictions, its utility as a predictor of long-term CPAP adherence in middle-aged patients with OSA. A prospective longitudinal design was used. 117 patients with objectively verified OSA intended for CPAP treatment were recruited. Data was collected via clinical examinations, respiratory recordings, questionnaires, and CPAP devices at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. The CHI-5 showed satisfactory homogeneity interitem correlations (0.42-0.93), item-total correlations (0.58-0.91), and reliability ( α = 0.92). CHI-5 data at 6 months showed a one-factor solution and predicted 63% of variance in total CPAP use hours after 12 months. Based on the satisfactory measurement properties and the high amount of CPAP use variance it explained, the CHI-5 can be seen as a useful tool in clinical practice.

  • 47.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Ear Nose & Throat Clin, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Linköping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden.
    Factors associated with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensive primary care patients2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 30, no 2, 107-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. In hypertensive primary care patients below 65 years of age, (i) to describe the occurrence of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and (ii) to identify the determinants of moderate/severe OSA. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Four primary care health centres in Sweden. Patients. 411 consecutive patients (52% women), mean age 57.9 years (SD 5.9 years), with diagnosed and treated hypertension (BP > 140/90). Main outcome measures. Occurrence of OSA as measured by the apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI). Results. Mild (AHI 5-14.9/h) and moderate/severe (AHI > 15/h) OSA were seen among 29% and 30% of the patients, respectively. Comparing those without OSA with those with mild or moderate/severe OSA, no differences were found in blood pressure, pharmacological treatment (anti-hypertensive, anti-depressive, and hypnotics), sleep, insomnia symptoms, daytime sleepiness, or depressive symptoms. Obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) was seen in 30% and 68% of the patients with mild and moderate/severe OSA, respectively. Male gender, BMI > 30 kg/m(2), snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleep duration > 8 hours were determinants of obstructive sleep apnoea. Conclusion. Previously undiagnosed OSA is common among patients with hypertension in primary care. Obesity, snoring, witnessed apnoeas, long sleep duration, and male gender were the best predictors of OSA, even in the absence of daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms.

  • 48.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sex-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration, depression, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in an older community-dwelling population2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore whether associations between self-reported sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness differed in older community-dwelling men and women. Design: Cross-sectional.

    Methods: A community-dwelling sample of 675 older men and women (mean age 77.7 years, SD 3.8 years) was used. All participants underwent a clinical examination by a cardiologist. Validated questionnaires were used to investigate sleep duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Subjects were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours), n = 231; normal sleepers (7-8 hours), n = 338; and long sleepers (≥9 hours), n = 61. ancovas were used to explore sex-specific effects.

    Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with short sleep in men, but not in women. Fatigue was associated with both short and long sleep duration in men. No sex-specific associations of sleep duration with daytime sleepiness or anxiety were found.

    Conclusion: Nurses investigating sleep duration and its correlates, or effects, in clinical practice need to take sex into account, as some associations may be sex specific. Depressive symptoms and fatigue can be used as indicators to identify older men with sleep complaints.

  • 49.
    Byrne, Molly
    et al.
    National University of Ireland, Galway, School of Psychology, Galway, County Galway, Ireland.
    Doherty, Sally
    RCSI, Department of Population and Health Science, School of Psychology, Dublin, Ireland.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Steinke, Elaine E.
    Wichita State University, School of Nursing, Wichita, Kansas, USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University of Linköping, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Devane, Declan
    National University of Ireland Galway, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Galway, Ireland.
    Sexual counselling for sexual problems in patients with cardiovascular disease2016In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 2, 1-39 p., CD010988Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sexual problems are common among people with cardiovascular disease. Although clinical guidelines recommend sexual counselling for patients and their partners, there is little evidence on its effectiveness.

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of sexual counselling interventions (in comparison to usual care) on sexuality-related outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease and their partners.

    SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and three other databases up to 2 March 2015 and two trials registers up to 3 February 2016.

    SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs, including individual and cluster RCTs. We included studies that compared any intervention to counsel adult cardiac patients about sexual problems with usual care.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane.

    MAIN RESULTS: We included three trials with 381 participants. We were unable to pool the data from the included studies due to the differences in interventions used; therefore we synthesised the trial findings narratively.Two trials were conducted in the USA and one was undertaken in Israel. All trials included participants who were admitted to hospital with myocardial infarction (MI), and one trial also included participants who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. All trials followed up participants for a minimum of three months post-intervention; the longest follow-up timepoint was five months.One trial (N = 92) tested an intensive (total five hours) psychotherapeutic sexual counselling intervention delivered by a sexual therapist. One trial (N = 115) used a 15-minute educational video plus written material on resuming sexual activity following a MI. One trial (N = 174) tested the addition of a component that focused on resumption of sexual activity following a MI within a hospital cardiac rehabilitation programme.The quality of the evidence for all outcomes was very low.None of the included studies reported any outcomes from partners.Two trials reported sexual function. One trial compared intervention and control groups on 12 separate sexual function subscales and used a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. They reported statistically significant differences in favour of the intervention. One trial compared intervention and control groups using a repeated measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and concluded: "There were no significant differences between the two groups [for sexual function] at any of the time points".Two trials reported sexual satisfaction. In one trial, the authors compared sexual satisfaction between intervention and control and used a repeated measured ANOVA; they reported "differences were reported in favour of the intervention". One trial compared intervention and control with a repeated measures ANCOVA and reported: "There were no significant differences between the two groups [for sexual satisfaction] at any of the timepoints".All three included trials reported the number of patients returning to sexual activity following MI. One trial found some evidence of an effect of sexual counselling on reported rate of return to sexual activity (yes/no) at four months after completion of the intervention (relative risk (RR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26 to 2.32; one trial, 92 participants, very low quality of evidence). Two trials found no evidence of an effect of sexual counselling on rate of return to sexual activity at 12 week (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.09; one trial, 127 participants, very low quality of evidence) and three month follow-up (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.10; one trial, 115 participants, very low quality of evidence).Two trials reported psychological well-being. In one trial, no scores were reported, but the trial authors stated: "No treatment effects were observed on state anxiety as measured in three points in time". In the other trial no scores were reported but, based on results of a repeated measures ANCOVA to compare intervention and control groups, the trial authors stated: "The experimental group had significantly greater anxiety at one month post MI". They also reported: "There were no significant differences between the two groups [for anxiety] at any other time points".One trial reporting relationship satisfaction and one trial reporting quality of life found no differences between intervention and control.No trial reported on satisfaction in how sexual issues were addressed in cardiac rehabilitation services.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found no high quality evidence to support the effectiveness of sexual counselling for sexual problems in patients with cardiovascular disease. There is a clear need for robust, methodologically rigorous, adequately powered RCTs to test the effectiveness of sexual counselling interventions for people with cardiovascular disease and their partners.

  • 50.
    Byrne, Molly
    et al.
    National University of Ireland, Galway, School of Psychology, Galway, County Galway, Ireland.
    Doherty, Sally
    RCSI, Department of Population and Health Science, School of Psychology, Dublin, Ireland.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Steinke, Elaine E.
    Wichita State University, School of Nursing, Wichita, Kansas, USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University of Linköping, Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Devane, Declan
    National University of Ireland Galway, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Galway, Ireland.
    Sexual counselling for sexual problems in patients with cardiovascular disease (Protocol)2014In: The Cochrane library, ISSN 1465-1858, no 2 (CD010988), 1-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 366
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