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  • 1.
    Abbasi, Amir Zaib
    et al.
    IRC for Finance and Digital Economy, KFUPM Business School, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.
    Azeem, Sundas
    Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science and Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Farooq, Muhammad Usman
    Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science and Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Hussain, Khalil
    Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science and Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Ting, Ding Hooi
    Department of Management and Humanities, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar, Malaysia.
    Rehman, Umair
    User Experience Design, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Engagement in educational games and quality of life in early and middle childhood: evidence from a developing country2023In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, p. 19386-19400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serious games (SGs), are gaining prominence as a tool for early education at home as well as in school settings. Given the mixed effects of gamification on various aspects of users' lives, it is pertinent to study its broader effects on a child's pre-school and school years. Given the lack of consensus on a comprehensive measure that encapsulates these effects on an individual's routine functioning, the present study examined whether various engagement states in SGs use influence a relatively broader measure of users' functioning across significant life domains such as Quality of Life (QoL). It is argued that it would serve scholars, teachers, and parents better to understand the broader implications of SGs on children's overall QoL rather than isolated physiological and behavioral effects. Consequently, utilizing structural equation modeling, results from 335 parents of 2-10-year-olds in a developing country showed that cognitive and behavioral engagement in gamified applications appear to influence the child's QoL, but not affective engagement. Results are discussed in terms of the consequences of using game-based technology for a child's development, with far-reaching academic, personal, physical, and social implications not only for the school-going ages, but also for early teenage years. The results are promising in relation to QoL. The findings indicate the role modern technology plays in improving individuals' lives. The findings provide scholars, parents, and creators of SGs important information for their plan of action regarding children's exposure to SGs and making SGs a frequent aspect of the learning experience early in life.

  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    The nurse anesthetist perioperative dialog2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In the perioperative dialogue, pre-, intra- and postoperatively, the patient shares their history. In the dialogue, the nurse anesthetist (NA) gets to witness the patient's experiences and can alleviate the patients' suffering while waiting for, or undergoing surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the nurse anesthetist's experiences of the perioperative dialogue. Methods The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 12 NA and analyzed with interpretive content analysis. The methods were conducted in accordance with the COREQ guidelines. Results In the result, three categories emerge: A mutual meeting (the preoperative dialogue) where the patient and the NA through contact create a relationship. The NA is present and listens to the patient, to give the patient confidence in the NA. In the category, On the basis of the patient's needs and wishes (the intraoperative dialogue), the body language of the NA, as well as the ability to read the body language of the patient, is described as important. In the category, To create a safe situation (the postoperative dialogue) the NA ensures that the patient has knowledge of what has happened and of future care in order to restore the control to the patient. Conclusion The patient is met as a person with their own needs and wishes. It includes both a physical and a mental meeting. In a genuine relationship, the NA can confirm and unreservedly talk with the patient. When the patients leave their body and life in the hands of the NA, they can help the patients to find their inherent powers, which allows for participation in their care. Understanding the patient is possible when entering in a genuine relationship with the patient and confirm the patient. The perioperative dialogue forms a safety for the patients in the operating environment.

  • 3.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    To enhance the quality of CPR performed by youth layman2019In: International Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1865-1372, E-ISSN 1865-1380, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By educating laymen, survival after cardiac arrest can increase in society. It is difficult to reach the entire population with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. However, if 15% of the population knows how to perform CPR, an increase in short- and long-term survival in patients suffering a cardiac arrest could be seen. To educate youth is a way to reach parts of the population. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a 2-h CPR intervention for youth.

  • 4.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Odestrand, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    To strengthen self-confidence as a step in improving prehospital youth laymen basic life support2020In: BMC Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1471-227X, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A rapid emergency care intervention can prevent the cardiac arrest from resulting in death. In order for Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) to have any real significance for the survival of the patient, it requires an educational effort educating the large masses of people of whom the youth is an important part. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a two-hour education intervention for youth regarding their self-confidence in performing Adult Basic Life Support (BLS).

    METHODS:

    A quantitative approach where data consist of a pre- and post-rating of seven statements by 50 participants during an intervention by means of BLS theoretical and practical education.

    RESULTS:

    The two-hour training resulted in a significant improvement in the participants' self-confidence in identifying a cardiac arrest (pre 51, post 90), to perform compressions (pre 65, post 91) and ventilations (pre 64, post 86) and use a defibrillator (pre 61, post 81). In addition, to have the self-confidence to be able to perform, and to actually perform, first aid to a person suffering from a traumatic event was significantly improved (pre 54, post 89).

    CONCLUSION:

    By providing youth with short education sessions in CPR, their self-confidence can be improved. This can lead to an increased will and ability to identify a cardiac arrest and to begin compressions and ventilations. This also includes having the confidence using a defibrillator. Short education sessions in first aid can also lead to increased self-confidence, resulting in young people considering themselves able to perform first aid to a person suffering from a traumatic event. This, in turn, results in young people perceiveing themselves as willing to commence an intervention during a traumatic event. In summary, when the youth believe in their own knowledge, they will dare to intervene.

  • 5.
    Adams, Mary
    et al.
    King’s College London, UK.
    Maben, Jill
    King’s College London, UK.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). King’s College London, UK.
    ‘It’s sometimes hard to tell what patients are playing at’: How healthcare professionals make sense of why patients and families complain about care2018In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 603-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from sociological and socio-legal studies of dispute between patients and doctors to examine how healthcare professionals made sense of patients’ complaints about healthcare. We analyse 41 discursive interviews with professional healthcare staff working in eight different English National Health Service settings to explore how they made sense of events of complaint and of patients’ (including families’) motives for complaining. We find that for our interviewees, events of patients’ complaining about care were perceived as a breach in fundamental relationships involving patients’ trust or patients’ recognition of their work efforts. We find that interviewees rationalised patients’ motives for complaining in ways that marginalised the content of their concerns. Complaints were most often discussed as coming from patients who were inexpert, distressed or advantage-seeking; accordingly, care professionals hearing their concerns about care positioned themselves as informed decision-makers, empathic listeners or service gate-keepers. We find differences in our interviewees’ rationalisation of patients’ complaining about care to be related to local service contingences rather than to fixed professional differences. We note that it was rare for interviewees to describe complaints raised by patients as grounds for improving the quality of care. Our findings indicate that recent health policy directives promoting a view of complaints as learning opportunities from critical patient/consumers must account for sociological factors that inform both how the agency of patients is envisaged and how professionalism exercised contemporary healthcare work.

  • 6.
    Ahmady, Soleiman
    et al.
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Fac Med Educ, Tehran, Iran.;Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Velenjak St,Shahid Chamran Highway, Tehran 1985717443, Iran..
    Mirmoghtadaie, Zohrehsadat
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Fac E Learning Med Educ, Tehran, Iran.;Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Velenjak St,Shahid Chamran Highway, Tehran 1985717443, Iran..
    Zarifsanaiey, Nahid
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Fac E Learning Med Educ, Tehran, Iran.;Virtual Sch, Neshat Ave, Shiraz 713451846, Iran.;Ctr Excellence Elect Learning, Neshat Ave, Shiraz 713451846, Iran..
    Thor, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Univ Jonkoping, Sch Hlth & Welf, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Univ Jonkoping, Acad Improvement Hlth & Welf, GA-511, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Designing e-learning in medical education: Toward a comprehensive model2021In: Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education (TOJDE), E-ISSN 1302-6488, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 254-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to present a comprehensive model for designing e-learning in Medical education. This qualitative study was performed in three stages. First, we used the "critical review" approach proposed by CarnWell to synthesize a conceptual model from studies that employ e-learning in Medical education. In the second stage, using Bereday's comparative method, 30 renowned virtual universities were evaluated. Finally, after aggregating and summarizing the results of the previous stages, the model was presented. The results of the study showed that designing e-learning in medical education requires making plans on national and international levels. Moreover, for qualitative and quantitative improvement of e-learning, global progress, achievements, and standards should be monitored continuously, and strategic, tactical, and executive aspects should be rigorously addressed. This comprehensive model for the design and development of e-learning in medical education is identified as an area requiring further research.

  • 7.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Univ Hosp Linkoping, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, ADULT, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Oral health-related situations among patients with experience of continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a critical incident analysis of experiences and actions2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no Suppl 1, article id P085Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    “The terrible dryness woke me up, I had some trouble breathing”- critical situations related to oral health as described by CPAP-treated persons with obstructive sleep apnea2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no 6, article id e13670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous positive airway pressure is a common and effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, but adherence remains an issue. Both obstructive sleep apnea and oral diseases are associated with cardiovascular diseases, and as oral dryness contributes to treatment abandonment, oral health is of importance for this patient group. The aim was therefore to explore how persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea experience situations associated with their oral health, and which actions they take to manage these. An explorative and descriptive design was adopted using the critical incident technique. Based on a purposeful selection, 18 adults with long-term experience of continuous positive airway pressure-treatment were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Both negative and positive situations were described. Negative situations consisted of challenges with breathing, including mouth-breathing, choking sensations, problems with night-time and daytime oral dryness, changes in the saliva composition, and deteriorating oral health. Positive situations included experiences of reduced mouth-breathing and oral dryness. The situations were often successfully managed by mimicking daytime movements, changing sleeping position, adjusting the CPAP-device and mask, increasing oral hygiene efforts, drinking water, using a humidifier or chinstrap, or contacting their oral healthcare clinic. Long-term experience of persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea regard situations and actions from everyday life. Successful management can contribute to long-term adherence and decrease negative effects on oral health. More interdisciplinary collaborations could enable identification and adequate recommendations for persons who experience negative situations during their continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 9.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Folktandvården Region Jönköpings län.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Avdelningen för Klinisk Neurofysiologi, Linköpings Universitetssjukhus, Linköping.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Inspektionen för Socialförsäkringen, Göteborg.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral hälsa och obstruktiv sömnapné- protokoll för en longitudinell studie2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Ulander, Martin
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Jansson, Henrik
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    “No one seems to know”: Studieprotokoll för utvärdering av ett teoretiskt ramverk för oral hälsa avseende reliabilitet och validitet i en obstruktiv sömnapné population2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Views on oral health determinants as described by persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnoea: a qualitative study2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oral diseases have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and persons with continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP]-treated obstructive sleep apnoea [OSA] have an increased risk for negative consequences for both oral and general health. CPAP treatment is often life-long and adherence to treatment is essential. Xerostomia is a common side-effect which can lead to treatment abandonment. Oral health is a changeable part of our general health and well-being and exploring the views of oral health determinants from persons with experience of CPAP-treatment is important to prevent adverse oral health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore what persons with experience of CPAP-treated OSA view as determinants for their oral health.

    METHODS: Eighteen persons with long-term experience of CPAP-treated OSA were purposively selected. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. A code book based on the World Dental Federation's [FDI] theoretical framework for oral health was developed and used to analyse the data using directed content analysis. The domains in the framework's component driving determinants were used as pre-determined categories. Using the description of driving determinants as a guide, meaning units were extracted from the interview transcripts through an inductive approach. Then, by employing a deductive approach the code book was used to categorise the meaning units into the pre-determined categories.

    FINDINGS: The views on oral health determinants described by the informants were compatible with the five domains in the component driving determinants in the FDI's theoretical framework. Ageing, heredity, and salivation (biological and genetic factors), influences from family and the wider society (social environment), location and re-localisation (physical environment), oral hygiene habits, motivation, willingness to change, professional support (health behaviours), and availability, control, finances, and trust (access to care) were viewed as important oral health determinants by the informants.

    CONCLUSION: The study points to a variety of individual oral health-related experiences that oral healthcare professionals could consider when designing interventions to reduce xerostomia and prevent adverse oral health outcomes for persons undergoing long-term CPAP-treatment.

  • 12.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Imani, Vida
    Pediatric Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Chen, Hsin-Pao
    Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, E-DA Hospital, I-Shou University, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Mediating Roles of Psychological Distress, Insomnia, and Body Image Concerns in the Association Between Exercise Addiction and Eating Disorders2023In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 16, p. 2533-2542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Exercising can promote good health. However, excessive exercising may have downsides. This study examined the association between exercise addiction and eating disorders and whether the identified association was mediated by psychological distress, insomnia (including sleep quality), and body image concern.

    Methods: A total of 2088 adolescents (mean age of 15.3 years) participated in this cross-sectional study by questions assessing exercise addiction, eating disorders, psychological distress, insomnia, sleep quality, and body image concern.

    Results: There were significantly positive relationships between the variables (r=0.12-0.54, p<0.01) with effect sizes from small to large. The four potential mediators (ie, insomnia, sleep quality, psychological distress, and body image concern), individually and in total, significantly mediated the association between exercise addiction and eating disorders.

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that exercise addiction in adolescents may influence eating disorders through multiple pathways, such as insomnia, psychological distress, and body image concerns. Future research should examine these relationships longitudinally and use gathered information to inform intervention development. Clinicians and healthcare workers are encouraged to assess exercise addiction when treating individuals with eating disorders.

  • 13.
    Aidemark, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Askenäs, Linda
    Linnaeus University.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University.
    User involvement in the co-design of self-care support systems for heart failure patients2015In: Procedia Computer Science, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 64, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the nature of user involvement in a co-design process will be explored. The outlines of a research project aiming at developing support systems for self-care inpatients suffering from chronic heart failure will be presented. The project is planned to perform a co-design effort where users (patients and healthcare professionals) will be given the opportunity to influence the development of support systems. We will discuss a number of possibilities and challenges that lie in the design of this kind of project and also some findings from its early stages. This report presents the experiences of users’ input, which are discussed in the context of previous research on benefits of user contributions in systems development.

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  • 14.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Användning av RiksSvikt – vad gör vi egentligen? Notering från en pågående studie2016Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Presentation
  • 15.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Creating value for those who need us! Person-centered care provided by foundations, associations and patient organizations in Nordic countries2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Erfarenheter av praktiskt arbete med värdegrund, social dokumentation, ICF och kvalitetsarbete2016In: Social dokumentation i handläggning och genomförande: med värdegrund och ICF / [ed] Thomas Carlsson, Ann Nilsson, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2016, p. 89-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Systematiskt förbättringsarbete och innovationer - en viktig del i eHälsa2015Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Presentation
  • 18.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, UNIVERSITY OF GOTHENBURG.
    Värdeskapande inom vård och omsorg genom användning av kvalitetsregister – ett ehälsa-perspektiv2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. University of Gothenburg, Faculty of Education, Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, Sweden.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Region Jönköping County, Futurum, Sweden.
    Thor, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Quality indicators and their regular use in clinical practice – results from a survey among users of two cardiovascular National Registries in Sweden2018In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 786-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the regular use of quality indicators from Swedish cardiovascular National Quality Registries (NQRs) by clinical staff; particularly differences in use between the two NQRs and between nurses and physicians.

    Design: Cross-sectional online survey study.

    Setting: Two Swedish cardiovascular NQRs: a) Swedish Heart Failure Registry and b) Swedeheart.

    Participants: Clinicians (n=185; 70% nurses, 26% physicians) via the NQRs’ email networks.

    Main outcome measures: Frequency of NQR use for a) producing healthcare activity statistics; b) comparing results between similar departments; c) sharing results with colleagues; d) identifying areas for quality improvement (QI); e) surveilling the impact of QI efforts; f) monitoring effects of implementation of new treatment methods; g) doing research; h) educating and informing healthcare professionals and patients.

    Results: Median use of NQRs was ten times a year (25th and 75th percentiles range: 3 – 23 times/year). Quality indicators from the NQRs were used mainly for producing healthcare activity statistics. Median use of Swedeheart was six times greater than SwedeHF (p<0.000). Physicians used the NQRs more than twice as often as nurses (18 vs. 7.5 times/year; p<0.000) and perceived NQR work more often as meaningful. Around twice as many Swedeheart users had the role to participate in data analysis and in QI efforts compared to SwedeHF users.

    Conclusions: Most respondents used quality indicators from the two cardiovascular NQRs infrequently (< 3 times/year). The results indicate that linking registration of quality indicators to using them for QI activities increases their routine use and makes them meaningful tools for professionals.

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  • 20.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, UNIVERSITY OF GOTHENBURG.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Framtid och framgång för kvalitetsregisters möjligheter2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, Faculty of Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Coenen, Michaela
    Institute for Medical Information Processing, Biometry and Epidemiology (IBE), Chair of Public Health and Health Services Research, Research Unit for Biopsychosocial Health, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Centre of Interprofessional Collaboration within Emergency care (CICE), Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden.
    A scoping review and mapping exercise comparing the content of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) across heart disease-specific scales2020In: Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes, ISSN 2509-8020, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 7Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, the importance of person-centered care has led to increased interest in patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). In cardiovascular care, selecting an appropriate PROM for clinical use or research is challenging because multimorbidity is often common in patients. The aim was therefore to provide an overview of heart-disease specific PROMs and to compare the content of those outcomes using a bio-psycho-social framework of health.

    METHODS: A scoping review of heart disease-specific PROMs, including arrhythmia/atrial fibrillation, congenital heart disease, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, and valve diseases was conducted in PubMed (January 2018). All items contained in the disease-specific PROMs were mapped to WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) according to standardized linking rules.

    RESULTS: A total of 34 PROMs (heart diseases in general n = 5; cardiac arrhythmia n = 6; heart failure n = 14; ischemic heart disease n = 9) and 147 ICF categories were identified. ICF categories covered Body functions (n = 61), Activities & Participation (n = 69), and Environmental factors (n = 17). Most items were about experienced problems of Body functions and less often about patients' daily activities, and most PROMs were specifically developed for heart failure and no PROM were identified for valve disease or congenital heart disease.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results motivate and provide information to develop comprehensive PROMs that consider activity and participation by patients with various types of heart disease.

  • 22.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, UNIVERSITY OF GOTHENBURG.
    Coenen, Michaela
    Research Unit for Biopsychosocial Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich, Germany .
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Content-comparison of patient-reported outcomes in disease specific scales for patients with different types of cardiac diseases - a literature review2014In: EuroHeartCare 2014, April 4-5, 2014, Stavanger, Norway, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany .
    Sunnehagen, Katharina S
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Factors Associated With Health-Related Quality of Life After Stroke: A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study2012In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, ISSN 1545-9683, E-ISSN 1552-6844, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 266-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In line with patient-centered health care, it is necessary to understand patients’ perceptions of health. How stroke survivors perceive their health at different time points after stroke and which factors are associated with these feelings provide important information about relevant rehabilitation targets. Objective. This study aimed to identify the independent factors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from a biopsychosocial perspective using the methods of multivariate regression at 3 different time points poststroke. Methods. Included in the study were 99 patients from stroke units with diagnosed first-ever stroke. At admission and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year poststroke, HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQoL-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS). Consequences in Body Functions and Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were documented using 155 categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Stroke. Results. For a period of 1 year, problems with recreation and leisure, personality functions, energy and drive functions, and gait pattern functions were repeatedly associated with worse HRQoL. Whereas Body Functions and Activities and Participation explained more than three-fourths of the variances of HRQoL at 6 weeks and 3 months (R 2 = 0.80-0.93), the variation at 1 year was best explained by either Body Functions or Environmental Factors (R 2 = 0.51). Conclusions. The results indicate the importance of Body Functions and Activities and Participation (mainly personality functions and recreation and leisure) on HRQoL within 3 months poststroke, but increased impact of Environmental Factors on HRQoL at 1 year.

  • 24.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, UNIVERSITY OF GOTHENBURG.
    Gäre, Klas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Från Kvalitetsregister till bättre vård och omsorg – komplexitetens utmaning2013In: Nationella kvalitetsregisterkonferensen 2013, 9-10 oktober, Quality Hotel Friends Arena, Stockholm.: Forum för medicinsk kvalitet & ständigt förbättringsarbete. Kan kvalitetsregister styra vården?, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Faculty of Education, Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vasko, Peter
    Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Selb, Melissa
    ICF Research Branch, a cooperation partner within the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland; and Swiss Paraplegic Research, Nottwil, Switzerland .
    Coenen, Michaela
    ICF Research Branch, a cooperation partner within the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland; Department of Medical Information Processing, Biometry and Epidemiology-IBE, Chair of Public Health and Health Services Research, Research Unit for Biopsychosocial Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) Munich, Munich, Germany; and Pettenkofer School of Public Health (PSPH), Munich, Germany .
    Content comparison and person-centeredness of standards for quality improvement in cardiovascular health care2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 1, article id e0244874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Quality standards are important for improving health care by providing compelling evidence for best practice. High quality person-centered health care requires information on patients' experience of disease and of functioning in daily life.

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze and compare the content of five Swedish National Quality Registries (NQRs) and two standard sets of the International Consortium of Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) related to cardiovascular diseases.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: An analysis of 2588 variables (= data items) of five NQRs-the Swedish Registry of Congenital Heart Disease, Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry, Swedish Catheter Ablation Registry, Swedish Heart Failure Registry, SWEDEHEART (including four sub-registries) and two ICHOM standard sets-the Heart Failure Standard Set and the Coronary Artery Disease Standard Set. According to the name and definition of each variable, the variables were mapped to Donabedian's quality criteria, whereby identifying whether they capture health care processes or structures or patients' health outcomes. Health outcomes were further analyzed whether they were clinician- or patient-reported and whether they capture patients' physiological functions, anatomical structures or activities and participation.

    RESULTS: In total, 606 variables addressed process quality criteria (31%), 58 structure quality criteria (3%) and 760 outcome quality criteria (38%). Of the outcomes reported, 85% were reported by clinicians and 15% by patients. Outcome variables addressed mainly 'Body functions' (n = 392, 55%) or diseases (n = 209, 29%). Two percent of all documented data captured patients' lived experience of disease and their daily activities and participation (n = 51, 3% of all variables).

    CONCLUSIONS: Quality standards in the cardiovascular field focus predominately on processes (e.g. treatment) and on body functions-related outcomes. Less attention is given to patients' lived experience of disease and their daily activities and participation. The results can serve as a starting-point for harmonizing data and developing a common person-centered quality indicator set.

  • 26.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Nordin, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Så blir ditt register attraktiv för kliniknära förbättringsarbete: Noteringar från en pågående studie - angreppsätt för att förbättra ANVÄNDANDET av kvalitetsregister2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Faculty of Education, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordin, Annika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Peterson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    In-depth comparison of two quality improvement collaboratives from different healthcare areas based on registry data - Possible factors contributing to sustained improvement in outcomes beyond the project time2019In: Implementation Science, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) are widely used to improve healthcare, but there are few studies of long-term sustained improved outcomes, and inconsistent evidence about what factors contribute to success. The aim of the study was to open the black box of QICs and compare characteristics and activities in detail of two differing QICs in relation to their changed outcomes from baseline and the following 3 years.

    Methods: Final reports of two QICs - one on heart failure care with five teams, and one on osteoarthritis care with seven teams, including detailed descriptions of improvement projects from each QIC's team, were analysed and coded by 18 QIC characteristics and four team characteristics. Goal variables from each team routinely collected within the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (SwedeHF) and the Better Management of Patients with OsteoArthritis Registry (BOA) at year 2013 (baseline), 2014, 2015 and 2016 were analysed with univariate statistics.

    Results: The two QICs differed greatly in design. The SwedeHF-QIC involved eight experts and ran for 12 months, whereas the BOA-QIC engaged three experts and ran for 6 months. There were about twice as many activities in the SwedeHF-QIC as in the BOA-QIC and they ranged from standardisation of team coordination to better information and structured follow-ups. The outcome results were heterogeneous within teams and across teams and QICs. Both QICs were highly appreciated by the participants and contributed to their learning, e.g. of improvement methods; however, several teams had already reached goal values when the QICs were launched in 2013.

    Conclusions: Even though many QI activities were carried out, it was difficult to see sustained improvements on outcomes. Outcomes as specific measurable aspects of care in need of improvement should be chosen carefully. Activities focusing on adherence to standard care programmes and on increased follow-up of patients seemed to lead to more long-lasting improvements. Although earlier studies showed that data follow-up and measurement skills as well as well-functioning data warehouses contribute to sustained improvements, the present registries' functionality and QICs at this time did not support those aspects sufficiently. Further studies on QICs and their impact on improvement beyond the project time should investigate the effect of those elements in particular. 

  • 28.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, Faculty of Education, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden, and International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements (ICHOM), Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Ramirez, Jessily P.
    International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements (ICHOM), Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Salt, Matthew
    International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements (ICHOM), Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Sillett, Nick
    International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements (ICHOM), Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Myers, Stacie N.
    International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements (ICHOM), Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Alvarez-Cote, Albie
    International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements (ICHOM), Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Butcher, Nancy J.
    Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Caneo, Luiz F.
    Heart Institute, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Cespedes, Jaime A.
    Fundacion Cardioinfantil- Instituto de Cardiologia, Universidad del Rosario, Bogota, Colombia.
    Chaplin, John E.
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ng, Kee Chong
    KK Women & Children's Hospital, Singapore.
    García-García, Juan J.
    Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain.
    Hazelzet, Jan A.
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Klassen, Anne F.
    Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
    Turquetto, Aida Luiza R.
    Heart Institute, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Mew, Emma J.
    Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Morris, Michael
    Samuel Morris Foundation, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, and Sydney Children's Hospital Networks, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Offringa, Martin
    Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    O'Meara, Matthew
    NSW Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Papp, James M.
    Mindful Metrics, LLC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
    Rodrigo, Carlos
    Pediatrics, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Badalona, Catalunya, Spain, and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Facultat de Medicina, Bellaterra, Catalunya, Spain.
    Switaj, Timothy L.
    U.S. Army, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Valencia Mayer, Catalina
    Fundación CINDA - Universidad El Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.
    Jenkins, Kathy J.
    Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Development of an international standard set of patient-centred outcome measures for overall paediatric health: a consensus process2021In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 106, no 9, p. 868-876, article id 320345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To develop an Overall Pediatric Health Standard Set (OPH-SS) of outcome measures that captures what matters to young people and their families and recognising the biopsychosocial aspects of health for all children and adolescents regardless of health condition.

    Design

    A modified Delphi process.

    Setting

    The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement convened an international Working Group (WG) comprised of 23 international experts from 12 countries in the field of paediatrics, family medicine, psychometrics as well as patient advisors. The WG participated in 11 video-conferences, through a modified Delphi process and 9 surveys between March 2018 and January 2020 consensus was reached on a final recommended health outcome standard set. By a literature review conducted in March 2018, 1136 articles were screened for clinician and patient-reported or proxy-reported outcomes. Further, 4315 clinical trials and 12 paediatric health surveys were scanned. Between November 2019 and January 2020, the final standard set was endorsed by a patient validation (n=270) and a health professional (n=51) survey.

    Results

    From a total of 63 identified outcomes, consensus was formed on a standard set of outcome measures that comprises 10 patient-reported outcomes, 5 clinician-reported measures, and 6 case-mix variables. The four developmental age-specific packages (ie, 0–5, 6–12, 13–17, 18–24 years) include either five or six measures with an average time for completion of 20 min.

    Conclusions

    The OPH-SS is a starting point to drive value-based paediatric healthcare delivery from a global perspective for enhancing child and adolescent physical health and psychosocial well-being.

  • 29.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, UNIVERSITY OF GOTHENBURG.
    Schneider, Thomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Famna.
    Johansson, Cecilia
    Bräcke Diakoni.
    Johansson, Lars-Åke
    Alkit Communication AB.
    Idéburna innovationer – En testbädd för personcentrerad vård och omsorg2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Välfärdens utmaningar måste bemötas med innovativa och förebyggande arbetssätt och en helt ny användning av teknik. Men hur skapar man innovationer i vårdens och omsorgens vardag? Hur kan man se det friska i människan och hur kan medarbetare, patienter/brukare och närstående tillsammans hitta nya arbetssätt som gör vården och omsorgen bättre? Bräcke diakoni driver tillsammans med Famna, Jönköping Academy och Alkit Communication AB Famnas testbädd för en personcentrerad vård och omsorg. I den bygger man ett stöd för idéburna vård- och omsorgsgivare för att utveckla nya idéer till spridningsbara innovationer med fokus på de vi finns till för. I ett första test på Bräcke diakoni skapar man möjligheter att möta den enskildes behov och önskemål. Arbetet utgår från en strukturerad dokumentation och uppföljning som med hjälp av ICF och nya IT-stöd följer den enskildes väg genom vården och omsorgen. Möt Famnas testbädd, Vinnova och Äldreutredningen för att diskutera framtidens vård och omsorg.

  • 30.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Suwono, Beneditta
    Coenen, Michaela
    What are the Swedish Healthcare Quality Registries about? Content comparison using WHO’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and ICF Core Sets2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Weitkunat, Rolf
    Monitoring behavioral risks – the development of lifestyle risk scale2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Weitkunat, Rolf
    Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Un iversity of Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Perception and prevalence of behavioral risk factors: the lifestyle risk scale (LRS)2011In: Open Journal of Preventive Medicine, ISSN 2162-2477, E-ISSN 2162-2485, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 143-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop a lifestyle risk scale (LRS) of health-related behaviors based on risk assessments of study participants.

    Method: By means of pairwise comparisons of assessed risks associated with tobacco, alcohol, obesity, fast-food, physical inactivity, and lack of sleep, each at four levels, 24 behaviors were ranked on a unidimensional risk scale.

    Results: Overall, use of tobacco was assigned the highest risk score (3.7), consumption of fast-food and lack of sleep the lowest (1.7, 1.6). Minor risk factors (lack of sleep and fast-food) were, at their highest levels, assigned similar risk values as major risk factors (tobacco, alcohol, obesity) at their lowest levels. Lifestyles of female participants were less hazardous than those of male participants, as measured with the LRS. In contrast, perception of behavioral health risks was more precise in men.

    Conclusions: The LRS provides a practical quantification to identify and compare groups with different risk behavior patterns as well as clusters of risky health be- haviors in and across populations. It can also support the communication of behavioral health risks.

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  • 33.
    Alijanzadeh, Mehran
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan 70101, Taiwan..
    Yahaghi, Rafat
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Rahmani, Jalal
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Yazdi, Nahid
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Elahe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Alijani, Hashem
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Zamani, Narges
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Fotuhi, Razie
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Taherkhani, Elham
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Buchali, Zeinab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Robabe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Mahmoudi, Narges
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Poorzolfaghar, Leila
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Ahmadizade, Safie
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Shahbazkhania, Azam
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Measurement Invariance and Differential Item Functioning of the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults (HELIA): A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study in Iran2022In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 2064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health literacy is important for health behavior engagement. Therefore, it is important to have a good instrument assessing health literacy with a theoretical framework. The present study aimed to examine the measurement invariance and differential item functioning (DIF) of a newly developed health literacy instrument; that is, the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults (HELIA). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch models were used to examine the data collected from a large Iranian sample (N = 9678; 67.3% females; mean age = 36.44 years). All the participants completed the HELIA. CFA was used to examine if the HELIA had a five-factor structure (including reading, access to information, understanding, appraisal, and decision making/behavioral intention factors) and multigroup CFA to examine if the five-factor structure of HELIA was invariant across gender, educational level, accommodation, and age subgroups. Rasch models were used to examine whether each factor of HELIA was unidimensional and DIF contrast in Rasch to examine if the HELIA items were interpreted similarly across the aforementioned subgroups. The CFA results supported the five-factor structure of HELIA, and the Rasch models verified that each HELIA factor is unidimensional. Additionally, multigroup CFA supported the measurement invariance of HELIA across the following subgroups: male vs. female; highly educated vs. poorly educated; city residents vs. suburban residents; and younger age vs. older age. The DIF contrasts in the Rasch models additionally showed that there are no substantial DIF items in the HELIA across aforementioned subgroups. Therefore, the HELIA is a feasible and comprehensive instrument assessing health literacy across different populations in Iran.

  • 34.
    Alijanzadeh, Mehran
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Yahaghi, Rafat
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Rahmani, Jalal
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Yazdi, Nahid
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Jafari, Elahe
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Alijani, Hashem
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Zamani, Narges
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Fotuhi, Razie
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Taherkhani, Elham
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Buchali, Zeinab
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Zarenejad, Masoume
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Mahmoudi, Narges
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Shahmahdi, Najmeh
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Poorzolfaghar, Leila
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Ahmadizade, Safie
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Shahbazkhania, Azam
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Gozal, David
    Department of Child Health, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, United States.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Biostatistics Consulting Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Sleep hygiene behaviours mediate the association between health/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing2023In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 2349-2360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health literacy and e-health literacy are important factors helping people shape awareness of health behaviours in different aspects, including sleep hygiene behaviours. Good sleep hygiene behaviours promote sleep quality and are beneficial to overall mental wellbeing.

    Objective

    We aimed to examine if sleep hygiene behaviours may mediate the association between health literacy/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing.

    Methods

    Adult Iranian subjects (n = 9775; mean [SD] age = 36.44 [11.97] years; 67.3% females) completed the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults, eHealth Literacy Scale, three items on sleep hygiene behaviour that have been used in prior research and the Short Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale. Data were then subjected to structural equation modelling (SEM) including 500 bootstrapping resampling to examine whether sleep hygiene is a mediator in the relationship between health literacy/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing.

    Findings

    Both health literacy and e-health literacy were significantly associated with mental wellbeing (r = .63 for health literacy and .39 for e-health literacy; p < .001) and sleep hygiene behaviours (r = .58 for health literacy and .36 for e-health literacy; p < .001). Sleep hygiene behaviours were significantly associated with mental wellbeing (r = .42; p < .001). Moreover, SEM that incorporated bootstrapping approaches indicated that sleep hygiene behaviours were significant mediators in the association between health literacy/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that health literacy and e-health literacy are associated with mental health wellbeing in the Iranian population. Additionally, the association could be mediated via sleep hygiene behaviours.

    Patient or Public Contribution

    The study was co-designed with healthcare providers from the vice-Chancellor's Office for Health Affairs of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences as equal partners. Moreover, the women's health volunteers were involved in the design of the study.

  • 35.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Bahrami, N.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Khodaparast, S.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Mediating role of psychological distress and domestic violence in the association of fear of COVID-19 with marital satisfaction and sexual quality of life among women of reproductive age: An Iranian cross-sectional study2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the mediating role of psychological distress and domestic violence in the association of fear of COVID-19 with marital satisfaction and sexual quality of life (QoL) among Iranian women of reproductive age. METHODS: A cross-sectional study comprising 324 married women was conducted. Online convenience sampling was used to collect data. SPSS PROCESS macro was used for the mediation analysis. The direct and indirect effects of the fear of COVID-19 on sexual QoL and marital satisfaction were estimated comprising a 95% CI using 5000 bootstrap samples. Pairwise comparisons between the mediators were calculated by Hayes' macros. RESULTS: A positive/negative or suspected history of COVID-19 infection had marginally significant relationship with marital satisfaction (p=0.049). The total effect of fear of COVID-19 on sexual QoL was significant (b=-1.31, SE=0.20, p<0.001). Fear of COVID-19 had no significant direct effect on sexual QoL (b=-0.22, SE=0.19, p=0.24) but it had an indirect effect on sexual QoL via mediation of psychological distress (b=-0.34, SE=0.09, 95% CI: -0.53 to -0.19) and domestic violence (b=-0.75, SE=0.18, 95% CI: -1.12 to -0.40). The total effect of fear of COVID-19 on marital satisfaction was significant (b=-1.91, SE=0.32, p<0.001). Fear of COVID-19 had no significant direct effect (b=0.20, SE=0.25, p=0.42) on marital satisfaction but it had an indirect effect on marital satisfaction via mediation of psychological distress (b=-0.59, SE=0.13, 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.36) and domestic violence (b=-1.51, SE=0.29, 95% CI: -2.08 to -0.92). CONCLUSION: The fear of COVID-19 during the pandemic indirectly decreased women's marital satisfaction and sexual QoL via increased psychological distress and domestic violence. Consequently, in critical situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic, improving couples' psychological health and reducing domestic violence are likely to improve women's sexual QoL and marital satisfaction.

  • 36.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ohayon, M. M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Jernelöv, S.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Huddinge Hospital, Region Stockholm, M58, Stockholm, SE-141 86, Sweden.
    Kaldo, V.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Huddinge Hospital, Region Stockholm, M58, Stockholm, SE-141 86, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Reply to Liu et al.: “Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis”2022In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 66, article id 101699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Application of online cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia among individuals with epilepsy2023In: Handbook of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy by Disorder: Case Studies and Application for Adults / [ed] C. R. Martin,V. B. Patel & V. R. Preedy, Elsevier , 2023, p. 409-415Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 50 million individuals worldwide suffer from epilepsy, which has various neurological, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences including insomnia. Several factors may explain insomnia among individuals with epilepsy including new diagnoses of epilepsy, changes at work, school, and social role changes. Moreover, anxiety, stress, and insecurity about seizure control can contribute to insomnia. Nonpharmacological methods including cognitive-behavioral therapy can be used to alleviate insomnia. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a type of psychotherapy that focuses on the effect of an individual’s beliefs, thoughts, and attitudes on their feelings and behaviors. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is one of the therapies in sleep science and uses the general principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy and is designed to eliminate the symptoms of insomnia. The internet is an emerging platform for mental health services worldwide. Internet-based CBT or CBT-I has been used for insomnia with promising results. If the content of CBT-I-based technology (which is disseminated via the internet, e-mail, or mobile phone) is of good quality and has credible evidence-based experiences, it will have positive therapeutic effects and initial patient acceptance. This chapter introduces the application of a six-session online CBT-I for three individuals with epilepsy. The content can also be used as a guide for treating insomnia among individuals with epilepsy.

  • 38.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Epilepsy, sexual function, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy2023In: Handbook of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy by Disorder: Case Studies and Application for Adults / [ed] C. R. Martin,V. B. Patel & V. R. Preedy, Elsevier , 2023, p. 135-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Epilepsy, like many common medical disorders, can cause sexual dysfunction. However, the prevalence and nature of sexual dysfunction among people with epilepsy, its causes, and optimal management strategies are unclear. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy is caused by several factors including disease-related factors and drug treatment, psychiatric factors, and social factors. Due to the significant prevalence of sexual dysfunction among patients with epilepsy, the synergistic effect of sexual dysfunction, and mental disorders, design and implementation of psychological interventions including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for sexual disorders among patients with epilepsy have been proposed. MBCT is an approach to psychotherapy that uses cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques alongside mindfulness meditation techniques. MBCT protocol has been adapted to treat female sexual dysfunction of different groups including epilepsy showing promising effects. Consequently, issues concerning sexual activity should be raised by healthcare professionals as a routine part of the management of patients with epilepsy, and MBCT can be considered as a promising effective treatment strategy.

  • 39.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3415613911, Iran.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701401, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Worldwide Estimation of Parental Acceptance of COVID-19 Vaccine for Their Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2023In: Vaccines, E-ISSN 2076-393X, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, the best method to well control the spread of COVID-19 without severe mental health problems is to reach herd immunity. Therefore, the vaccination rate of the COVID-19 vaccine is critical. Among the populations, children are the vulnerable ones to get vaccinated; therefore, it is important to assess parents’ and guardians’ willingness to have their children vaccinated. The present systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized evidence to estimate the parents’ acceptance rate of COVID-19 vaccination toward their children. Additionally, factors explaining the acceptance rate were investigated. Four academic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and ProQuest) together with Google Scholar were searched, and the references of the included publications were searched as well. Using the PECO-S framework (population, exposure, comparison, outcome, and study design), observational studies of cross-sectional, cohort, or case-control studies were included. The outcome was parents’ or guardians’ willingness to let their children be vaccinated. The studies included in the present review were restricted to English and peer-reviewed papers published between December 2019 and July 2022. A total of 98 papers across 69 different countries with 413,590 participants were included. The mean age of the parents was 39.10 (range: 18–70) years and that of their children was 8.45 (range: 0–18) years. The pooled estimated prevalence of parental acceptance to vaccinate their children with the COVID-19 vaccine was 57% (98 studies, 95% CI: 52–62%, I2: 99.92%, τ2: 0.06). Moreover, data collection time was a significant factor explaining parental willingness in the multivariable meta-regression, with a 13% decrease in parental willingness by each month increase in time, explaining 11.44% of variance. Qualitative synthesis results showed that parents’ COVID-19 vaccine knowledge, trust in theCOVID-19 vaccine, and facilitators in vaccination (e.g., low cost, good vaccine accessibility, and government incentive) were significant factors for higher willingness, while mental health problems (e.g., having worries and psychological distress) were significant factors for lower willingness. Given that the acceptance rate was relatively low (57%) and does not achieve the requirement of herd immunity (i.e., 70%), governments and healthcare authorities should try to elevate parents’ knowledge and trust in the COVID-19 vaccine, facilitate in vaccination, and reduce their mental difficulties to improve the overall vaccination rate among children.

  • 40.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Majd, N. R.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    RezaeiNiaraki, M.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Bajalan, Z.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Prevalence of household food insecurity and its predictive role on the health of mothers with children aged under 60 months2022In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, E-ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 51, p. 246-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Food insecurity can have poor physical and mental health consequences for all family members. The present study investigated the prevalence of household food insecurity and its predictive role on the health of mothers of children aged under 60 months in Qazvin (Iran). Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between January 2019 and December 2020. Participants included all mothers with children aged under 60 months who referred themselves to comprehensive health centers in Qazvin (N = 1750; mean age 30.61 years). Convenience sampling was performed. Data were collected using a demographic information checklist, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Data analysis was performed using independent t-tests, one-way analyses of variance, uni-variable and multivariable linear regression with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Two-thirds of the participants had a secure food status (68.4%). Household food security status showed a significant, and inverse relationship with general health subscales. General health subscales of depression (standardized mean difference or SMD: −1.24 [95% CI: −1.36; −1.13]), somatic symptoms (SMD: −0.92 [95% CI: −1.03; −0.81]) and anxiety and insomnia (SMD: −0.72 [95% CI: −0.83; −0.61]) were significantly lower among food secure participants vs. food insecure participants. Social dysfunction was not significantly associated with household food security. The regression models demonstrated that household food security was a significant predictor for the health of mothers with children aged under 60 months: uni-variable (β = −0.38) and multivariable (β = −0.41). Conclusion: Household food security is associated with various aspects of mothers’ health. Since the growth and development of a healthy child depends on having a healthy mother, the food security situation of the family and the general health of mother can be assessed as part of providing health service regarding monitoring growth and development of children. This will help in targeting appropriate interventions if needed.

  • 41.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Jafari, Elahe
    Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan.
    Rajabi, Raheleh
    Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Marznaki, Zohreh H.
    Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Soodmand, Mostafa
    Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Yale University, United States.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Estimation of moral distress among nurses: A systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 334-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Moral distress is a common challenge among professional nurses when caring for their patients, especially when they need to make rapid decisions. Therefore, leaving moral distress unconsidered may jeopardize patient quality of care, safety, and satisfaction. Aim: To estimate moral distress among nurses.

    Methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis conducted systematic search in Scopus, PubMed, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge, and PsycInfo up to end of February 2022. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa checklist. Data from included studies were pooled by meta-analysis with random effect model in STATA software version 14. The selected key measure was mean score of moral distress total score with its’ 95% Confidence Interval was reported. Subgroup analyses and meta-regressions were conducted to identify possible sources of heterogeneity and potentially influencing variables on moral distress. Funnel plots and Begg’s Tests were used to assess publication bias. The Jackknife method was used for sensitivity analysis.

    Ethical consideration: The protocol of this project was registered in the PROSPERO database under decree code of CRD42021267773.

    Results: Eighty-six manuscripts with 19,537 participants from 21 countries were included. The pooled estimated mean score of moral distress was 2.55 on a 0–10 scale [95% Confidence Interval: 2.27–2.84, I2: 98.4%, Tau2:0.94]. Publication bias and small study effect was ruled out. Moral distress significantly decreased in the COVID-19 pandemic versus before. Nurses working in developing countries experienced higher level of moral distress compared to their counterparts in developed countries. Nurses' workplace (e.g., hospital ward) was not linked to severity of moral disturbance.

    Conclusion: The results of the study showed a low level of pooled estimated score for moral distress. Although the score of moral distress was not high, nurses working in developing countries reported higher levels of moral distress than those working in developed countries. Therefore, it is necessary that future studies focus on creating a supportive environment in hospitals and medical centers for nurses to reduce moral distress and improve healthcare.

  • 42.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Non Communicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Elahe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Non Communicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Yale Univ, Ctr Child Study, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.;Yale Univ, Ctr Child Study, Sch Med, Dept Neurosci, New Haven, CT 06511 USA..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Univ Rd, Tainan 701401, Taiwan..
    Wu, Chien-Yi
    E Da Hosp, Dept Pediat, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan.;I Shou Univ, Sch Med, Coll Med, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, S-55318 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Binge-Watching and Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 15, article id 9707Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Binge-watching, the viewing of online videos or streamed content, may be associated with different types of mental health problems. The present study aimed to investigate the associations between binge-watching and five mental health concerns including depression, loneliness, sleep problems, anxiety, and stress. Methods: Academic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, PsycINFO, and Psych Articles were systematically searched through February of 2022. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the methodological quality. A meta-analysis was performed on Fisher's z values as effect sizes, using a random effect model. Publication bias, small study effect, and moderators in this association were assessed. Results: Binge-watching was significantly associated with the five types of mental health concerns with the most robust correlations found with stress (0.32) and anxiety (0.25). Stronger associations between binge-watching and two types of mental health problems (depression and sleep problems) were found during the COVID-19 pandemic than before the pandemic. Moreover, stronger associations between binge-watching and two types of mental health problems (stress and sleep problems) were found in developing countries than in developed countries. Conclusions: The associations between binge-watching and mental health concerns were significant and positive. Programs and interventions to reduce binge-watching should be considered and tested.

  • 43.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lotfi, Aida
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Estimation of Behavioral Addiction Prevalence During COVID-19 Pandemic: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2022In: Current Addiction Reports, E-ISSN 2196-2952, Vol. 9, p. 486-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of Review

    The COVID-19 pandemic changed people's lifestyles and such changed lifestyles included the potential of increasing addictive behaviors. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of different behavioral addictions (i.e., internet addiction, smartphone addiction, gaming addiction, social media addiction, food addiction, exercise addiction, gambling addiction, and shopping addiction) both overall and separately.

    Recent Findings

    Four databases (PubMed, Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, and ProQuest) were searched. Peer-reviewed papers published in English between December 2019 and July 2022 were reviewed and analyzed. Search terms were selected using PECO-S criteria: population (no limitation in participants' characteristics), exposure (COVID-19 pandemic), comparison (healthy populations), outcome (frequency or prevalence of behavioral addiction), and study design (observational study). A total of 94 studies with 237,657 participants from 40 different countries (mean age 25.02 years; 57.41% females). The overall prevalence of behavioral addiction irrespective of addiction type (after correcting for publication bias) was 11.1% (95% CI: 5.4 to 16.8%). The prevalence rates for each separate behavioral addiction (after correcting for publication bias) were 10.6% for internet addiction, 30.7% for smartphone addiction, 5.3% for gaming addiction, 15.1% for social media addiction, 21% for food addiction, 9.4% for sex addiction, 7% for exercise addiction, 7.2% for gambling addiction, and 7.2% for shopping addiction. In the lockdown periods, prevalence of food addiction, gaming addiction, and social media addiction was higher compared to non-lockdown periods. Smartphone and social media addiction was associated with methodological quality of studies (i.e., the higher the risk of boas, the higher the prevalence rate). Other associated factors of social media addiction were the percentage of female participants, mean age of participants, percentage of individuals using the internet in country, and developing status of country. The percentage of individuals in the population using the internet was associated with all the prevalence of behavioral addiction overall and the prevalence of sex addiction and gambling addiction. Gaming addiction prevalence was associated with data collection method (online vs. other methods) that is gaming addiction prevalence was much lower using online methods to collect the data.

    Summary

    Behavioral addictions appeared to be potential health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic. Healthcare providers and government authorities should foster some campaigns that assist people in coping with stress during COVID-19 pandemics to prevent them from developing behavioral addictions during COVID-19 and subsequent pandemics.

  • 44.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Sallam, Malik
    Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; Department of Clinical Laboratories and Forensic Medicine, Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan; Department of Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jafari, Elahe
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and the Child Study Center and Wu Tsai Institute, Yale School of Medicine / Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA; Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT, USA.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among migrant and refugee groups: A systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: Vaccine: X, ISSN 2590-1362, Vol. 14, article id 100308Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Understanding COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among migrant and refugee groups is critical for achieving vaccine equity. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among migrant and refugee populations.

    METHODS: A systematic review (PROSPERO: CRD42022333337) was conducted (December 2019-July 2022) using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest and Google Scholar.

    RESULTS: Nineteen studies from 12 countries were included. The pooled estimated prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine willingness among migrant and refugee groups was 70% (19 studies, 95% CI: 62.3-77.4%, I2: 99.19%, τ2: 0.03). Female and male participants did not differ significantly with each other (p = 0.64). Although no individual variable contributed statistically significantly in multivariable meta-regression analysis, the multivariable model that considered methodological quality, mean age of participants, participant group and country of origin explained 67% of variance.

    DISCUSSION: Proportions of migrant/refugee groups receiving COVID-19 vaccinations approximated those observed among general populations. Additional studies are needed to examine factors relating to vaccine willingness to identify the most significant factors that may be targeted in interventions.

  • 45. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Isaksson, Helen
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Koch, Göran
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    BMI status in Swedish children and young adults in relation to caries prevalence: BMI and caries prevalence2011In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight and obesity are increasing as health problems at global level. Dental caries and obesity are both multifactorial diseases and are associated with dietary habits. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between body weight status and caries prevalence in an unselected population followed from pre-school years to young adulthood. The present investigation was designed as a longitudinal analysis of the association between overweight/obesity and dental caries in one population at 3, 6, 15 and 20 years of age. The result shows that adolescents (15 years) and young adults (20 years) who are overweight/obese had a statistically significantly higher caries prevalence than normal-weight young people. At 6 years of age, the odds (OR) of having caries among obese children are 2.5 times higher than the odds for caries among six-year-old children of normal weight (p = 0.04). At 3 years of age, no association between overweight/obesity and caries was found. To conclude, overweight and obese adolescents and young adults had more caries than normal-weight individuals. The present study emphasises the need for multidisciplinary approaches to change the lifestyle factors causing both overweight/obesity and dental caries.

  • 46.
    Al-Mamun, F.
    et al.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hussain, N.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sakib, N.
    Department of Microbiology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh.
    Hosen, I.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rayhan, I.
    Department of Economics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Abdullah, A. H.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Bhuiyan, A. K. M. I.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sarker, M. A.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, S.
    Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Zou, L.
    Body-Brain-Mind Laboratory, School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
    Manzar, M. D.
    Department of Nursing, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, Saudi Arabia.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Sikder, M. T.
    Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Muhit, M.
    Department of Public Health, University of South Asia, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Gozal, D.
    Department of Child Health and The Child Health Research Institute, The University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, United States.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Mamun, M. A.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sleep duration during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh: A GIS-based large sample survey study2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although several studies have been conducted in Bangladesh regarding sleep problems during the COVID-19 pandemic, none have utilized a large nationwide sample or presented their findings based on nationwide geographical distribution. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the total sleep duration, night-time sleep, and daily naptime and their associated factors as well as geographic information system (GIS) distribution. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 9730 people in April 2020, including questions relating to socio-demographic variables, behavioral and health factors, lockdown, depression, suicidal ideation, night sleep duration, and naptime duration. Descriptive and inferential statistics, both linear and multivariate regression, and spatial distribution were performed using Microsoft Excel, SPSS, Stata, and ArcGIS software. The results indicated that 64.7% reported sleeping 7–9 h a night, while 29.6% slept less than 7 h nightly, and 5.7% slept more than 9 h nightly. 43.7% reported 30–60 min of daily nap duration, whereas 20.9% napped for more than 1 h daily. Significant predictors of total daily sleep duration were being aged 18–25 years, being unemployed, being married, self-isolating 4 days or more, economic hardship, and depression. For nap duration, being aged 18–25 years, retired, a smoker, and a social media user were at relatively higher risk. The GIS distribution showed that regional division areas with high COVID-19 exposure had higher rates of non-normal sleep duration. Sleep duration showed a regional heterogeneity across the regional divisions of the country that exhibited significant associations with a multitude of socioeconomic and health factors.

  • 47.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Nord Ctr Classificat Hlth, S-16030 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Welmer, Anna-Karin
    ARC, Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in social services for elderly in Sweden2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine the content of health information in acts of social services of elderly people in relation to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and to describe the health information in the different parts of the acts according to the ICF. Method: Health information of 25 acts from four municipalities was analysed and the concepts were linked to ICF codes, using the established coding rules. Results: The health information consisted of 372 concepts, which were linked to 122 specific ICF codes. The concepts in the acts were mostly linked to the ICF component Activities and Participation, except for the current functioning concepts where the ICF component Body functions was the most frequent. The 3rd level was most frequent in Activities and Participation and in Environmental factors, and the 2nd level was most frequent in Body functions. Conclusions: The ICF covers the concepts and terms contained in the acts to a large extent. Furthermore, the results show that the ICF codes differ in the different parts of the acts. The ICF provides a coherent and structured documentation, which contributes to a legally secure assessment of assistance. The selection of ICF codes can be used in development of "code sets" for social services for elderly.

  • 48.
    Almers, Ellen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Askerlund, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Why forest gardening for children? Swedish forest gardeneducators' ideas, purposes, and experiences2018In: The Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, E-ISSN 1940-1892, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 242-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilizing forest gardens as urban settings for outdoor environmental education in Sweden is a new practice. These forest gardens combine qualities of a forest, e.g., multi-layered polyculture vegetation, with those of a school garden, such as accessibility and food production. The study explores both the perceived qualities of forest gardens in comparison to other outdoor settings and forest garden educators’ ideas, purposes, and experiences of activities in a three-year forest gardening project with primary school children. The data were collected through interviews and observations and analyzed qualitatively. Four reported ideas were to give children opportunities to: feel a sense of belonging to a whole; experience self-regulation and systemic dependence; experience that they can co-create with non-human organisms; and imagine possible transformation of places. Four pedagogical forest garden features are discussed.

  • 49.
    Anderson, Janet E.
    et al.
    Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King’s College London, London, UK.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King’s College London, London, UK.
    Nunes, Francisco
    Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behavior, ISCTE-IUL, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Bal, Roland
    Erasmus School of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Burnett, Susan
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College, UK.
    Karltun, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Sanne, Johan
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Aase, Karina
    SHARE—Centre for Resilience in Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Wiig, Siri
    SHARE—Centre for Resilience in Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Fulop, Naomi J.
    Department of Applied Health Research, University College London, UK.
    The QUASER Team, ,
    Translating research on quality improvement in five European countries into a reflective guide for hospital leaders: the ‘QUASER Hospital Guide’2019In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 31, no 8, p. G87-G96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to translate the findings of the QUASER study into a reflective, dialogic guide to help senior hospital leaders develop an organization wide QI strategy.

    Design: The QUASER study involved in depth ethnographic research into QI work and practices in two hospitals in each of five European countries. Three translational stakeholder workshops were held to review research findings and advise on the design of the Guide. An extended iterative process involving researchers from each participant country was then used to populate the Guide.

    Setting: The research was carried out in two hospitals in each of five European countries.

    Participants: In total, 389 interviews with healthcare practitioners and 803 hours of observations.

    Intervention: None.

    Main outcome measure: None.

    Results: The QUASER Hospital Guide was designed for leadership teams to diagnose their organization’s strengths and weaknesses in the eight QI challenges. The Guide supports organizational dialogue about QI challenges, enables leaders to share perspectives, and helps teams to develop solutions to their situated problems. The Guide includes extensive examples of QI strategies drawn from the data and is published online and on paper.

    Conclusion: The QUASER Hospital Guide is empirically based, draws on a dialogical approach to Organizational Development and complexity science and can facilitate hospital leadership teams to identify the best solutions for their organization.

  • 50.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Förbättringskunskap och förbättringsforskning: Kunskapsöversikt om förbättringsarbetes framväxt inom hälso- och välfärdssektorn i Sverige, samt implikationer för projektet Barnens Bästa Gäller! i Kronoberg2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna kunskapsöversikt är att belysa hur förbättringskunskapen utvecklats i den svenska hälsovård- och välfärdssektorn, och vilka implikationer förbättringskunskap kan ha för projektet ”Barnens Bästa Gäller! i Kronoberg” (BBGiK). Rapporten avslutas med en diskussion om de möjligheter och utmaningar som påverkar projektet. Förbättringskunskap är nära besläktat med kvalitetsutveckling, och är numer vanligt förekommande i hälso- vård- och välfärdsorganisationer. De lagar och regelverk som styr innefattar skyldigheter att bedriva kvalitetsutveckling, och Ledningssystem för systematiskt kvalitetsarbete (SOSFS 2011:9) gäller för både vård- och omsorgsorganisationer.

    Rapporten lyfter fram förbättringskunskapens ursprung, dess forskningsanknytning och evidens och utveckling och övergång till vård- och välfärdsorganisationer. När förbättringskunskap fått fäste i den kunskapsintensiva evidensbaserade vårdsektorn och förbättringsarbeten började bli mera vanligt, uppstod frågor om hur förbättringsmetoder fungerar. Flera av de tidiga aktörerna inom förbättringskunskap var läkare och sjuksköterskor, och därför blev det angeläget att även arbetet med förbättringar kunde betraktas utifrån evidenskrav. Runt sekelskiftet 2000 började de första forskningspublikationerna dyka upp. En av förbättringsforskningens stora utmaningar är att utveckla vetenskaplig robust kunskap, och en vanlig kritik har varit att en svag vetenskaplig och teoretisk grund.

    I rapporten har befintlig litteratur producerad i Sverige, i form av böcker och bokkapitel, avhandlingar och artiklar, sammanställts och analyserats avseende publikationsfrekvens över tid och innehåll (tema). Sammanställningen lyfter fram studier som har extra relevans för projektet, såsom samverkansprojekt och olika ansatser att överföra och anpassa förbättringskunskap till den sociala sektorn. Mellan åren 2007–2020 utkom 30 böcker, bokkapitel och enklare skrifter. De flesta är läroböcker i form av antologier skrivna för vårdens professioner och handlar ofta om grundläggande förbättringskunskap. 32 avhandlingar från nio svenska lärosäten identifierades, den första från 2003. Flera avhandlingar intar organisationsperspektiv, men även ledarskap, patientsäkerhet och patientinvolvering/delaktighet förekommer. Totalt 210 artiklar identifierades publicerade mellan 1992 och 2020, med flest antal (n=166) efter 2011. Tematiseringen resulterade i sex olika teman: 1) Systematiskt och värdeskapande förbättringsarbete; 2) Samverkan mellan organisationer och vårdgivare; 3) Användning av förbättringsmetoder och (teoretiska) modeller; 4) Ledarskap och lärande; 5) Mätningar, kvalitetsregister och uppföljning; samt 6) Personinvolvering och patientsäkerhet.

    Delaktighet och samskapade är en tydligt ökande trend inom vården. Samtidigt har det inom sociala verksamheter länge ansetts viktigt att beakta personers rättigheter och möjligheter till inflytande. Sammanställningen pekar mot en utveckling där samverkan mellan organisationer och samskapande med dem vård och omsorg är till för blir en allt viktigare faktor. Detta är en viktig aspekt för projektet BBGiK, som spänner över flera olika verksamheter och organisationer. Det är alltid en utmaning när olika verksamheter tillsammans ska hitta fungerande lösningar. Denna utmaning blir inte mindre av att de kommer ifrån olika kunskapstraditioner, men i projektet finns förutsättningar för gemensamt lärande runt en gemensam modell. En förutsättning för att lyckas med förbättringsarbete är ett aktivt ledarskap, och strävan mot samma gemensamma mål: ”att skapa en trygg och säker uppväxt för VARJE barn genom främjande, tidiga och samordnade insatser”.

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