Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahlström, Ö
    Linköping University.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier.

    METHOD: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years.

    RESULTS: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2.

    CONCLUSIONS: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 2.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fasth, A.
    Serum concentration of hyaluronan, IgM and IgA rheumatoid factors in a population based study of juvenile chronic arthritis1994In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 183-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased serum levels of hyaluronan (HA) have been found in patients with liver diseases, psoriasis, malignancies as well as in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. In the two latter groups serum HA levels may reflect the extent of synovial involvement and inflammation, rather than only unspecific information. This study was performed to elucidate the value of measuring HA in children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and to study its relation to class specific rheumatoid factors (IgM Rf and IgA Rf). HA was analysed in sera from 271 patients with JCA and 130 controls using a radiometric assay and IgM Rf and IgA Rf were analysed using an enzyme immunoassay. The results were analysed in relation to JCA subgroup, disease activity and functional outcome. In patients and controls higher levels of HA were found in young children than in older. Raised levels of HA and IgM Rf were mainly found in children with polyarticular disease. Impaired functional outcome was related to raised HA levels. No correlation was found between HA levels and IgM Rf or IgA Rf. Measurement of HA levels in JCA is of no diagnostic value because of low sensitivity. Quantification of HA may, however, have prognostic value in a subgroup of patients belonging to the polyarticular subgroup.

  • 3.
    Bertilsson, L.
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fasth, A
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, H.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 379-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years. Methods: This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used. Results: During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. Conclusion. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.

  • 4.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Haglund, Lena
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Hand function in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study over three years (the Swedish TIRA project)2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Trupin, L
    University of California, USA.
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Katz, P.
    University of California, USA.
    Yelin, E.
    University of California, USA.
    Differences in activity limitation, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden and the USA: a 5-year follow-up2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 428-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study we compared activity limitations, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden and the USA and aimed to determine whether nationality is associated with these outcomes.

    Methods: We used longitudinal data from the 'Swedish TIRA project' (n = 149) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) RA panel study (n = 85). Data were collected annually concerning use of medications [disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologics, and corticosteroids], morning stiffness, number of swollen joints, and number of painful joints. Three self-reported outcome measures were examined: pain intensity measured on a 0-100 visual analogue scale (VAS), activity limitation according to the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and global health. To analyse the data, the Student's t-test, the χ(2)-test, and the generalized estimating equation (GEE) method were used.

    Results: Nationality was significantly related to HAQ score and pain intensity, even after adjustment for covariates. The patients in the TIRA cohort reported a lower HAQ score and a higher pain intensity than the patients in the UCSF cohort. Nationality was not related to global health.

    Conclusion: Patients with RA should be assessed with awareness of the psychosocial and cultural context because disability seems to be affected by nationality. Further knowledge to clarify how a multinational setting affects disability could improve the translation of interventions for patients with RA across nationalities.

  • 6. Tarkowski, A.
    et al.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Aurell, M.
    Use of anti-thymocyte globulin in the management of refractory systemic autoimmune diseases1993In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 261-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of our pilot study was to evaluate the short-and long-term efficacy of T-lymphocyte depletion in the management of patients with refractory, systemic autoimmune diseases. Nine patients with severe, therapy-resistant autoimmune diseases were subjected to T-cell depletion procedure using polyclonal anti-T-cell antibodies combined with peroral administration of azathioprine and/or cyclosporine. The proband group consisted of 4 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 3 with progressive systemic sclerosis, and 2 with rheumatoid arthritis. Administration of polyclonal anti-T-cell antibodies was performed at a single occasion via a central venous catheter during 9-10 days. Immunological analyses of T-cell phenotypes and function and assessment of organ function (kidneys, lungs, bone-marrow) has been performed prospectively in all the patients studied. This treatment resulted in prompt and long-lasting (mean follow-up time: 25.6 months) improvement of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, glomerulonephritis, lung fibrosis, skin and joint involvements in the majority of cases. Adverse effects of this treatment included two episodes of infection (E. coli and Cytomegalovirus) and three cases of serum sickness, and were all easily managed. We suggest that this treatment modality adopted from transplant rejection therapy could be employed in cases of severe autoimmune diseases unresponsive to regular immunosuppressive treatment.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf