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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hakansson, C.
    Lund Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Lund, Sweden.
    Bjork, M.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Occupational balance and its relation to performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis in working age2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no Suppl. 2, p. 186-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Experience of balance in everyday activities where work is an essential part is important to health and well-being, as has also been observed in previous studies in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The Valued life activity scale (VLA-swe) is a questionnaire in which patient’s first report if the separate activities are valued or not to perform and secondly difficulties to perform these activities. Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ) focuses on satisfaction with the amount and variation of occupations.

    Objectives The objectives were to 1) describe the relationship between performance of valued activities and experienced occupational balance, and to 2) identify aspects associated with low occupational balance in persons with RA.

    Methods 368 persons (age 18–65 years, 77% women) with RA responded to a questionnaire measuring occupational balance (OBQ) and performance of valued life activities (VLA-swe). Other aspects of interest were activity limitations measured by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), pain (measured by VAS), continuous stress (stressed continuously for more than a month during the last 12 months), children at home, education, and living situation. The relation between OBQ and performance in VLA across genders and Workers/Non-workers were analysed using non-parametric correlation analyses. To identify the impact of different aspects on the likelihood that participants would report lower occupational balance, OBQ was analysed using workers/nonworkers, stress, gender, age, pain and difficulties performing valued activities as independent variables in logistic regressions models. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee (Dnr2011/452–31).

    Results The OBQ was significantly related to difficulties to perform valued activities reported by VLA (r=-0.41, p<0.001). Having more difficulties performing valued activities was the strongest predictor of lower occupation balance and increased the risk of reporting lower occupation balance with nearly five times (OR=4.54, p 0.001). Continuous stress increased the risk of having lower occupation balance more than three times (OR=3.27, p<0.0001) than those who not reported being stressed. The other variables show no significant impact on the likelihood that the participants would report lower occupational balance.

    Conclusions The results showed support for the relationship between occupation balance and performance of valued life activities and highlights to identify what’s important for the individual and to assume that in the rehabilitation. The results also show the importance of ability to manage stress, in order to enable for retaining ability to work and achieve high occupational balance.

  • 2.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fasth, A.
    Andersson, J.
    Berglund, G.
    Ekstrom, H.
    Eriksson, M.
    Hammaren, L.
    Holmquist, L.
    Ronge, E.
    Thilen, A.
    Incidence and prevalence of juvenile chronic arthritis: a population survey1987In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 277-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a population based epidemiological survey of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), performed in Western Sweden in 1983, an incidence of 12/100,000 was found. The estimated prevalence was 56/100,000. Subgroup distribution showed a preponderance of mono- and pauciarticular forms. The peak age of onset was between 0 and 4 years of age. Girls predominated over boys in a ratio of 3:2. Overall, 30% were antinuclear antibody (ANA) positive, 9% rheumatoid factor (RF) positive, and eye involvement occurred in 10% of the children. The results suggest differences in population based studies of JCA compared with previously reported hospital based series.

  • 3.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexual health in rheumatoid arthritis - The role of the physiotherapist to enhance sexual health2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, no Suppl. 2, p. 46-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual health is often negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but rarely discussed between patients and health care professionals. Experienced reasons for decreased sexual health vary among patients, but pain, stiffness, reduced mobility, fatigue and negative feelings towards one’s own body are common factors. In addition to negative effects experienced to be due to RA, there are also negative influences on sexual health by other factors, such as insufficient physical activity, low self-esteem, depression and stressful influences in life. Physiotherapy is a common intervention for patients with RA and patients have reported improved sexual health due to physiotherapy. Regular physiotherapy interventions for patients with RA often include coaching towards increasing physical activity levels, hydrotherapy, pain reductive treatment and mobility exercises, both individually and in groups. The physiotherapy interventions leading to improved sexual health (according to patients with RA) has been regular interventions for patients with RA and not specifically aimed at enhancing sexual health. The patients do seldom describe that the physiotherapist has informed them of how physiotherapy might enhance sexual health, but they have themselves experienced how physiotherapy has improved their sexual life. Patients describe that they experience joy, increased self-esteem and a more positive approach to their body, when participating in physiotherapy and that this positive feeling is affecting their life, including their sexual life. They also describe how increased physical capacity reduces fatigue and increases their capacity to engage in valued life activities, including sexual activities. The way that the physiotherapist can further enhance sexual health, is by informing the patient of how sexual health is linked to experienced symptoms of RA and how physiotherapy interventions, for example increasing physical activity, can enhance also sexual health

  • 4.
    Bala, V.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Forslind, K.
    Department of Clinical Science, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Svensson, B.
    Section of Rheumatology at the Institution of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, P.
    The PRO-CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Towards measurement of person-centered care outcomes in outpatient nurse-led clinics2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no Suppl. 2, p. 1520-1520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Person-centered care (PCC) is increasingly emphasized as a key component of effective illness management and of developing high quality of care. Despite considerable progress of PCC in many areas of care there is currently a gap and a need for means to assess PCC practice in outpatient care. In rheumatology, PCC is considered an unmet need and further development and evaluation of this approach to care is thus of high priority.

    Objectives To develop an instrument for measuring person-centered care from the perspective of the person with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in nurse-led outpatient clinics.

    Methods A conceptual framework of PCC in the outpatient context and focusing on the meeting between the person with RA and the nurse and on the patient as an active care partner was undertaken. Based on this framework, qualitative interviews (1,2) and a literature review, a 35-item questionnaire was proposed and qualitatively tested regarding acceptability and content validity among 50 persons with RA attending a nurse-led outpatient clinic. Two versions of the questionnaire were tested: one using four response categories (0 = Totally disagree; 3 = Completely agree), and one using two response categories (0 = Disagree; 1 = Agree). Content validity was estimated by calculating Content Validity Index of the individual items (I-CVI) and of the overall instrument (S-CVI).

    Results Respondents found the items easy to understand (77%) and relevant (93%). Seventy-three percent of the respondents preferred the questionnaire version with four response categories. This version took a mean (SD) of 5.3 (2.5) minutes to complete. I-CVI values ranged from 0.87 to 1.00 and S-CVI was 0.94. About 80% of the respondents considered some items to be redundant. This resulted in a reduced 24-item draft questionnaire that yield a total score between 0–72.

    Conclusions A preliminary 24-item patient-reported PCC questionnaire was developed. Psychometric testing is needed for validation of this tool before implementation.

  • 5. Saad-Magalhaes, C.
    et al.
    Pistorio, A.
    Ravelli, A.
    Filocamo, G.
    Viola, S.
    Brik, R.
    Mihaylova, D.
    Cate, R. T.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Ferriani, V.
    Minden, K.
    Hashkes, P.
    Rygg, M.
    Sauvain, M. J.
    Venning, H.
    Martini, A.
    Ruperto, N.
    Does removal of aids/devices and help make a difference in the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index?2010In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 82-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the removal of aids/devices and/or help from another person in the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (C-HAQ) leads to a significant change in the disability index (DI) score and responsiveness in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    METHODS: Changes in the C-HAQ DI score in a cross-sectional sample of 2663 children with JIA and in 530 active patients with JIA in a trial of methotrexate (MTX) were compared.

    RESULTS: Patients in the MTX trial had higher disease activity and disability than the cross-sectional sample. The frequency of aids/devices (range 1.2-10.2%) was similar between the two samples, while help (range 5.3-38.1%) was more frequently used in the MTX group. Correlation between disease severity variables and the two different C-HAQ DI scoring methods did not change substantially. There was a decrease in the C-HAQ DI score for both the cross-sectional (mean score from 0.64 with the original method to 0.54 without aids/devices and help, p<0.0001) and the MTX sample (mean score from 1.23 to 1.07, p<0.0001). A linear regression analysis of the original C-HAQ DI score versus the score without aids/devices and help demonstrated the substantial overlap of the different scoring methods. Responsiveness in the responders to MTX treatment did not change with the different C-HAQ DI scoring methods (range 0.86-0.82).

    CONCLUSION: The removal of aids/devices and help from the C-HAQ does not alter the interpretation of disability at a group level. The simplified C-HAQ is a more feasible and valid alternative for the evaluation of disability in patients with JIA.

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