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  • 1.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Sliding interactions: An ethnography about how persons with dementia interact in housing with care for the elderly.2011In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 523-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnography describes how persons with dementia interact with cognitively intact persons in housing with care for the elderly. The results, drawing upon 31 observation sessions and nine interviews, are described under the following themes, which were interpreted from the standpoint of social interaction theory: interaction with expression of satisfaction, disorientation, and dissociation. Interaction provided satisfaction, but did not always reflect a positive experience. Awareness in persons with dementia seemed to be greater than others perceived and, as a result, interaction was adversely affected by frequent well-intentioned corrections and comments. Participation in interaction can be encouraged and feelings of indignation avoided by assuming that persons with dementia are aware of their situation and how others behave toward them. Sensitivity is required to interpret individuals' expressions of desire not to participate, while simultaneously it is important to try to interpret why they want to refrain.

  • 2.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Creating relationships with persons with moderate to severe dementia2013In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study describes how relationships are created with persons with moderate to severe dementia. The material comprises 24 video sequences of Relational Time (RT) sessions, 24 interviews with persons with dementia and eight interviews with professional caregivers. The study method was Constructivist Grounded Theory. The categories of 'Assigning time', 'Establishing security and trust' and 'Communicating equality' were strategies for arriving at the core category, 'Opening up', which was the process that led to creating relationships. Both parties had to contribute to create a relationship; the professional caregiver controlled the process, but the person with dementia permitted the caregiver’s overtures and opened up, thus making the relationship possible. Interpersonal relationships are significant to enhancing the well-being of persons with dementia. Small measures like RT that do not require major resources can open paths to creating relationships.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Staff views on how to improve mealtimes for elderly people with dementia living at home2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 835-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia commonly leads to difficulties in performing daily activities, which can also often affect the ability to prepare and eat meals. As a result, formal support to maintain good nutritional intake might be needed, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning how to support older persons with dementia living at home. The aim of this study was to explore and describe staff views on how to improve mealtimes for persons with dementia who are still living at home. A qualitative descriptive study was performed and data were collected during 2011–2012 through four focus group interviews with staff working in the homes of persons with dementia. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The participants described several ways to improve mealtimes for persons with dementia and advocated adjustments facilitating the preservation of the persons’ independence. Finding suitable actions calls for knowledge about the person and his/her individual situation. Proposed actions were enabling meals at home, taking over, and moving meals outside of the home. In addition, it was found that, the types of meals served to these persons should be as familiar to the individual as possible. The results of this study indicate the importance of using a person-centered approach and meeting the individual needs when supporting people with dementia in regards to their meals when living at home. Individualized care in the home may be expensive, however, it is fair to say that people who become malnourished and admitted to hospitals is even more costly. Furthermore, sharing and reflecting experiences and knowledge can assist staff to identify ways to manage complex situations. Therefore, the use of refection should be a part of staff members’ everyday work.

  • 4. Måvall, Lena
    et al.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Day care for persons with dementia: An alternative for whom?2007In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Saffari, Mohsen
    et al.
    Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Koenig, Harold G.
    Duke University Medical Center, United States.
    O'Garo, Keisha N.
    Duke University Medical Center, United States.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Mediating effect of spiritual coping strategies and family stigma stress on caregiving burden and mental health in caregivers of persons with dementia.2018In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A considerable number of the persons living with dementia rely on family members for care and assistance when performing activities of daily living. As a result, caregivers may be at increased risk for mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and caregiver burden. This study examined if and how spiritual coping and stigma-related family stress impacted the associations between the patient activities of daily living impairment and caregiver mental health.

    Methods

    Using a longitudinal design, 664 caregivers were assessed at baseline for spiritual coping strategies and family stigma stress, along with patients' instrumental activities of daily living and cognitive functioning. After 12 months, caregivers were assessed for depressive and anxiety symptoms, caregiver burden, and quality of life (physical and mental). Sequential mediation of spiritual coping strategies and stigma-related family stress on the relationship between patient instrumental activities of daily living and caregiver mental health outcomes was examined using the PROCESS macro statistical method.

    Results

    Participants had been caring for someone with dementia for an average of 46.4 (SD, 16.9) months and 63% of caregivers were female. There were significant indirect associations between patient instrumental activities of daily living and caregiver anxiety, depression, caregiving burden, and the mental health component of quality of life. Spiritual coping and stigma-related stress mediated these associations (-0.54<b<-0.02). Overall, 26%, 41%, 49%, and 59% of the variances of caregiving burden, anxiety, depression, and mental functioning, respectively, were explained using the sequential mediation models.

    Conclusions

    Spiritual coping and stigma-related stress appear to mediate the relationship between the patient instrumental activities of daily living impairment and caregiver psychological health. These factors should be considered when addressing mental health problems experienced by caregivers.

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