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  • 1.
    Carlsson, N.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Alehagen, S.
    Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Johansson, A.
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    "Smoking in Children's Environment Test": a qualitative study of experiences of a new instrument applied in preventive work in child health care2011In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 11, no 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite knowledge of the adverse health effects of passive smoking, children are still being exposed. Children's nurses play an important role in tobacco preventive work through dialogue with parents aimed at identifying how children can be protected from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. The study describes the experiences of Child Health Care (CHC) nurses when using the validated instrument SiCET (Smoking in Children's Environment Test) in dialogue with parents.

    METHOD: In an intervention in CHC centres in south-eastern Sweden nurses were invited to use the SiCET. Eighteen nurses participated in focus group interviews. Transcripts were reviewed and their contents were coded into categories by three investigators using the method described for focus groups interviews.

    RESULTS: The SiCET was used in dialogue with parents in tobacco preventive work and resulted in focused discussions on smoking and support for behavioural changes among parents. The instrument had both strengths and limitations. The nurses experienced that the SiCET facilitated dialogue with parents and gave a comprehensive view of the child's ETS exposure. This gave nurses the possibility of taking on a supportive role by offering parents long-term help in protecting their child from ETS exposure and in considering smoking cessation.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the SiCET supports nurses in their dialogue with parents on children's ETS exposure at CHC. There is a need for more clinical use and evaluation of the SiCET to determine its usefulness in clinical practice under varying circumstances.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    Department of Health and Society, University College of Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    How to minimize children's environmental tobacco smoke exposure: an intervention in a clinical setting in high risk areas2013In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, no 76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the low prevalence of daily smokers in Sweden, children are still being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), primarily by their smoking parents. A prospective intervention study using methods from Quality Improvement was performed in Child Health Care (CHC). The aim was to provide nurses with new methods for motivating and supporting parents in their efforts to protect children from ETS exposure. METHOD: Collaborative learning was used to implement and test an intervention bundle. Twenty-two CHC nurses recruited 86 families with small children which had at least one smoking parent. Using a bundle of interventions, nurses met and had dialogues with the parents over a one-year period. A detailed questionnaire on cigarette consumption and smoking policies in the home was answered by the parents at the beginning and at the end of the intervention, when children also took urine tests to determine cotinine levels. RESULTS: Seventy-two families completed the study. Ten parents (11%) quit smoking. Thirty-two families (44%) decreased their cigarette consumption. Forty-five families (63%) were outdoor smokers at follow up. The proportion of children with urinary cotinine values of >6 ng/ml had decreased. CONCLUSION: The intensified tobacco prevention in CHC improved smoking parents' ability to protect their children from ETS exposure.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Berit M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Linköping, Sweden.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Linköping, Sweden.
    Emotional and behavioural problems in Swedish preschool children rated by preschool teachers with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)2017In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a high risk that young children who show early signs of mental health problems develop symptoms in the same or overlapping areas some years later. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is widely used to screen externalizing and internalizing problems early in life. In Sweden 80-90% of all children aged 1-5 years go to preschool and preschool is thus an appropriate context for finding early signs of mental health problems among children.

    Methods: This study is part of a longitudinal project too investigate the frequency of emotional and behavioural problems for children between 1 and 5 years of age in Sweden. The SDQ including the impairment supplement questions were rated by preschool teachers too establish Swedish norms for SDQ in preschool children.

    Results: The sample involved 815 children with a mean age of 42 months (SD = 16, range 13-71 months). 195 children were followed longitudinally for three years. There were significant differences between boys and girls on all subscales except for the Emotional subscale. The prevalence of behavioural problems was similar to other that in European countries, except for Prosocial behaviour, which was rated lower, and Conduct problems, rated higher. Swedish children were estimated to have more problems in the preschool setting, scored by preschool teachers. The development of behaviour over time differed for the different subscales of SDQ.

    Conclusions: The teacher version of the SDQ, for 2-4 year-olds, can be used as a screening instrument to identify early signs of emotional distress/behavioural problems in young children. Preschool teachers seem to be able to identify children with problematic behaviour with the use of SDQ at an early age. The development of behaviour over time differs for the different subscales of SDQ. The Swedish norms for SDQ are to a large extent, similar to findings from other European countries. 

  • 4.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study2008In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 8, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are increasing among children all over the world. Socio-economic factors may influence the development of overweight and obesity in childhood, and it has been proposed that breastfeeding may protect against obesity. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and obesity when potential confounders, such as socioeconomic factors, are considered. METHODS: The data analyzed was from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. All parents with children born between October 1, 1997 and October 1, 1999 in Southeast Sweden (n = 21,700) were asked to participate. Parents were asked to answer periodic questionnaires from the time of the child's birth (n = 16,058) until he/she was five years of age (n = 7,356). Cutoffs for overweight and obesity were defined according to Cole et al, age and gender adjusted. Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was defined as < 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify variables that predict the child's BMI (Body Mass Index) at five years of age. RESULTS: At five years of age, 12.9% of the children in the study were overweight and 4.3% were obese. At the age of three months, 78.4% of the children were being breastfed exclusively. The median exclusive breastfeeding duration was four months. High maternal BMI > 30 (AOR = 1.07; CI = 1.05-1.09; P < 0.001), maternal smoking (AOR = 1.43; CI = 1.05-1.95; P = 0.023) and being a single parent (AOR = 2.10; CI = 1.43-3.09; P < 0.001) were associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (less than 4 months). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was less common if one of the parents had a university degree (Mother: AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.61-0.90; P = 0.003 Father: AOR = 0.73; CI = 0.58-0.92; P = 0.008) or if the father was more than 37 years old (AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.55-0.99; P = 0.045). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was associated with obesity in five-year-old children (simple logistic regression: OR = 1.44; CI = 1.00-2.07; P = 0.050), but when including other independent factors in the analysis, short-term exclusive breastfeeding did not attain statistical significance. CONCLUSION: We cannot exclude the possibility that exclusive breastfeeding influences weight development, but it does not seem to protect against obesity at five years of age.

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