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  • 1.
    Bixo Ottosson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ilvered, Rosita
    Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Särnblad, Stefan
    Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Self-care management of type 1 diabetes has improved in Swedish schools according to children and adolescents2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1987-1993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Age-appropriate support for diabetes self-care is essential during school time, and we investigated the perceived quality of support children and adolescents received in 2015 and 2008.

    Methods: This national study was based on questionnaires answered by children and adolescents aged 6–15 years of age with type 1 diabetes attending schools or preschools in 2008 (n = 317) and 2015 (n = 570) and separate parental questionnaires. The subjects were recruited by Swedish paediatric diabetes units, with 41/44 taking part in 2008 and 41/42 in 2015.

    Results: Fewer participants said they were treated differently in school because of their diabetes in 2015 than 2008. The opportunity to perform insulin boluses and glucose monitoring in privacy increased (80% versus 88%; p < 0.05). Most (83%) adolescents aged 13–15 years were satisfied with the support they received, but levels were lower in girls (p < 0.05). More subjects had hypoglycaemia during school hours (84% versus 70%, p < 0.001), but hypoglycaemia support did not increase and was lower for adolescents than younger children (p < 0.001).

    Conclusion: Children and adolescents received more support for type 1 diabetes in Swedish schools in 2015 than 2008, but more support is needed by girls and during hypoglycaemia. 

  • 2. Donlau, Marie
    et al.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Independence in the toilet activity in children and adolescents with myelomeningocele - managing clean intermittent catheterization in a hospital setting2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 1972-1976Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Donlau, Marie
    et al.
    Imms, Christine
    Glad Mattsson, Gunilla
    Mattsson, Sven
    Sjörs, Anna
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Children and youth with myelomeningocele’s independence in managing clean intermittent catheterization in familiar settings.2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 429-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To examine the ability of children and youth with myelomeningocele to independently manage clean intermittent catheterization.

    Methods:  There were 50 participants with myelomeningocele (5–18 years); 13 of them had also participated in a previous hospital-based study. Their abilities and interest in completing the toilet activity were examined at home or in school using an interview and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Actual performance was observed and rated. Background variables were collected from medical records and KatAD+E tests.

    Results:  In total, 48% were observed to perform the toilet activity independently, in comparison with 74% who self-reported independence. Univariate analyses found KatAD+E could predict who was independent. COPM failed to do so. Ability to remain focused and ambulation were predictors of independence, but age, sex and IQ were not. Multivariable analysis found time to completion to be the strongest predictor of independence. Four children were independent in their familiar environment, but not in the hospital setting, and six of 13 children maintained focus only in their familiar environment.

    Conclusions:  Interviews were not sufficiently accurate to assess independence in the toilet activity. Instead, observations including time to completion are recommended. The execution of the toilet activity is influenced by the environmental context.

  • 4. Edbom, T
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lichtenstein, P
    Larsson, J-O
    Long-term relationship between symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and self-esteem in a prospective longitudinal study of twins2006In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 6, p. 650-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the long-term relationship between symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the developing self-esteem in a population-based sample of twins. Methods: The cohort is all twin pair families born in Sweden between May 1985 and December 1986 (n = 1.480). Wave 1 took place in 1994 when the twins were 8 years old and wave 2 in 1999 when the children were 13 years old. In wave 1 and 2 the parents completed questionnaires regarding ADHD-symptoms about their children. In wave 2 the twins completed a questionnaire about self-esteem and Youth Self Report (YSR). ADHD-symptoms and self-esteem were analyzed in the total study group. Results: There was a long-term relationship between high scores of parental-reported ADHD-symptoms at 8 and 13 years of age and low scores in measures of self-reported self-esteem at 13 years of age. In the cotwin control method controlling for YSR internalizing problem, paired comparisons within the twin pairs revealed that a high score of ADHD-symptoms at age 8 was related to significantly lower scores at age 13 in the self-esteem. Conclusions: The long-term relationships between ADHD-symptoms and a low self-esteem in a population-based sample were confirmed by the co-twin analyses.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Marit
    et al.
    Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lingfors, Hans
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Trends in prevalence of thinness, overweight and obesity among Swedish children and adolescents between 2004 and 2015.2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 10, p. 1818-1825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study explored weight trends among children aged 4, 7, 11, 14 and 17 years in Jönköping County Sweden, from 2004 to 2015.

    METHODS: The study had a repeated cross-sectional design, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on height and weight measurements collected from child health and school health records. The prevalence of thinness, overweight and obesity was estimated with international cut-offs, with linear trends calculated separately for boys and girls.

    RESULTS: There were 190 965 measurements of BMI and these covered 82-97% of the younger children and 55-69% of the older children during the study period. The prevalence of thinness varied between 0.2% and 2.2% across time and age groups and did not change over the study period. There was a small decrease in overweight among both girls and boys aged four years. There were increasing trends in overweight and obesity in both girls and boys aged 11 and 14 years of age and a sharp increase among 17-year-old boys, with 7.3% obese in 2014/2015 and 3.6% in 2004/2005.

    CONCLUSION: The prevalence of obesity decreased from 2004 to 2015 or was stable in younger Swedish children, but increased among older children, with a large increase in adolescent boys.

  • 6.
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Isaksson, Helen
    Alm, Anita
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Overweight and obesity in twenty-year-old Swedes in relation to birthweight and weight development during childhood2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 6, p. 637-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the frequency of overweight and obesity from birth to 20 years of age and analyse weight at 20 years of age in relation to weight and weight development during early childhood and adolescence.

    METHODS: A longitudinal, population-based study, which followed 496 children from birth to 20 years of age. Information about weight and height was collected from health records at child health centres and school health care. At 20 years of age, weight and height measurements were taken by one of the authors.

    RESULTS: At 20 years of age, 124 (25%) of the youth were obese or overweight. Of these youths, 60% had normal weight at 5.5 years. Of the teenagers who were overweight/obese at 15 years, 79% remained overweight/obese at 20 years of age. Out of the 124 overweight/obese at 20, 47% had normal weight at 15 years. [Corrections added after online publication on April 18, 2012: 'Out of the 124 obese at 20' has been changed to 'Out of the 124 overweight/obese at 20']. No relation was found between rapid weight gain during preschool age and overweight and obesity in 20-year-olds.

    CONCLUSIONS: The majority of those who were overweight/obese at 20 years of age were recruited after 5.5 years of age, and half of them in their late teens. Thus, during the preschool period, the entire population should be the target of primary prevention from overweight/obesity and, in the case of teenagers, prevention strategies should be developed for the whole population as well as treatment strategies for teenagers with established overweight/obesity.

  • 7.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Brekke, Hilde
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Relationship of food frequencies as reported by parents to overweight and obesity at 5 years2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate if food frequencies are related to overweight/obesity in 5-year-old children.

    Methods: During 1997–1999, 21 700 infants were invited to participate in ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective, cohort study. Participants were followed from birth (n = 16 058) to 5 years (n = 7356). Food frequencies reported by parents at 2.5 and 5 years were studied in the relation to overweight/obesity at 5 years using multiple logistic regressions. A p-value < 0.01 was considered statistically significant.

    Results: At 2.5 years frequencies of intake of cheese were positively associated with overweight/obesity at 5 years while porridge, fried potatoes/french fries and cream/crème fraiche showed a negative association. When adjusting for known risk factors, porridge and fried potatoes/french fries remained negatively associated with overweight/obesity. At 5 years, chocolate and lemonade were positively associated with overweight/obesity whereas cream/crème fraiche, pastries and candy were negatively associated. Candy remained negatively associated to overweight/obesity after adjustment for potential confounders.

    Conclusion: Food frequencies do not offer any simple explanation for overweight/obesity. Porridge at 2.5 years may protect against overweight/obesity at 5 years, while lemonade may contribute to overweight. Our finding that fried potatoes/french fries may protect against overweight/obesity is unexpected and must be interpreted with caution. These findings should be confirmed by prospective studies using objective recordings.

  • 8.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Risk factors in childhood obesity: findings from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 9, p. 1321-1325Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lillvist, Anne
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Preschool children in need of special support: prevalence of traditional disability categories and functional difficulties2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 131-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the prevalence of children who are in need of special support in the total population of children attending preschools (CA 1–6) in two Swedish counties, and the functional problems exhibited by the children in relation to demographical and environmental factors in the preschool context.

    Method: Survey distributed to (N = 1138) preschools in two Swedish counties.

    Results:The majority of children perceived by preschool teachers and in need of special support were undiagnosed children with functional difficulties related to speech, language and interaction with peers.

    Conclusion: Undiagnosed and diagnosed children share the same type of difficulties. Thus, in estimating the prevalence of children in need of special support in a preschool context, traditional disability categories capture only a small proportion of the children experiencing difficulties. Therefore, a functional approach in studies of children in need of special support is recommended.

  • 10. Ludvigsson, Johnny
    et al.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Eklöv, Kristina
    Klintström, Rebecka
    Lahdenperä, Anne
    Fasting plasma glucose levels in healthy preschool children: effects of weight and lifestyle.2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 706-709Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Norrby, U.
    et al.
    Nordholm, L.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fasth, A.
    Health-related quality of life in children diagnosed with asthma, diabetes, juvenile chronic arthritis or short stature2006In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 450-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: 1) To assess the reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), 2) to determine the correlation between children's and parents' responses to the CHQ, and 3) to describe and compare responses to the CHQ of four diagnostic groups. METHODS: A total of 199 Swedish children aged 9-16 with diagnoses of asthma (n = 53), diabetes (n = 48), short stature (n = 51) and juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA, n = 47) and their parents answered the CHQ and relevant validation instruments at a clinic check-up. Coefficient alphas were determined for all dimensions of the instrument, and all but four had acceptable to very good reliability (0.75-0.94). RESULTS: Concerning construct validity, the CHQ correlated significantly with appropriate dimensions of the validation instruments. In general, there were significant correlations between the children's and parents' responses. Comparisons between the diagnostic groups showed several significant differences. The short stature group had the highest quality of life and the JCA group the lowest. There were no sex differences, but children who had not reached puberty scored better on the dimensions of mental health and self-esteem. CONCLUSION: The Swedish version of the CHQ is a reliable and valid instrument. Furthermore, it is recommended to ask children themselves about their health-related quality of life.

  • 12.
    Oldin, C.
    et al.
    Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden and Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Schollin Ask, L.
    South General Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, S.
    Norrahammar Primary Health Care Centre, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Stenmarker, M.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Introduction of rotavirus vaccination in a Swedish region: assessing parental decision-making, obtained vaccination coverage and resulting hospital admissions2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 7, p. 1329-1337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    This study evaluated the introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Jönköping County, Sweden, starting in 2014. This project explored the parental factors that influenced the decision to vaccinate and studied the obtained vaccination coverage and its potential influence on hospital admissions due to acute gastroenteritis.

    Methods:

    This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study based on a study-specific questionnaire (n = 356) and regional statistical data on vaccination coverage and hospital admissions in Jönköping County, Sweden.

    Results:

    Central aspects when deciding on vaccination were vaccine efficacy and safety, that the vaccine was offered to all children, and recommended by healthcare professionals. One in five parents expressed uncertainty about whether they had sufficient information to make a decision. However, the rotavirus vaccination coverage was elevated from 76.1% to 81.0% and the hospital admissions due to acute gastroenteritis decreased by approximately 60%.

    Conclusion:

    The results highlight the necessity for Child Health Services to have solid knowledge regarding vaccinations, to understand individual parental issues and to support uncertain parents. The high vaccination coverage achieved is an indication of the trust in healthcare professionals and is considered to be a major contributing factor to the substantial reduction of hospital admissions due to acute gastroenteritis.

  • 13. von Essen, L
    et al.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kreuger, A
    Larsson, B
    Sjödén, PO
    Self-esteem, depression and anxiety among Swedish children and adolescents on and off cancer treatment2000In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed)
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