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  • 1.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Kogler, Géza F
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Arndt, Anton
    The influence of metatarsal support height and longitudinal axis position on plantar foot loading2008In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 640-647Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Larsen, Louise B.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, PO Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Effects of thigh holster use on kinematics and kinetics of active duty police officers2016In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 37, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body armour, duty belts and belt mounted holsters are standard equipment used by the Swedish police and have been shown to affect performance of police specific tasks, to decrease mobility and to potentially influence back pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects on gait kinematics and kinetics associated with use of an alternate load carriage system incorporating a thigh holster.

    Methods: Kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial data were collected using three dimensional gait analysis. Walking tests were conducted with nineteen active duty police officers under three different load carriage conditions: a) body armour and duty belt, b) load bearing vest, body armour and thigh holster and c) no equipment (control).

    Findings: No significant differences between testing conditions were found for temporospatial parameters. Range of trunk rotation was reduced for both load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p < 0.017). Range of hip rotation was more similar to the control condition when wearing thigh holster rather than the belt mounted hip holster (p < 0.017). Moments and powers for both left and right ankles were significantly greater for both of the load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p < 0.017).

    Interpretation: This study confirms that occupational loads carried by police have a significant effect on gait kinematics and kinetics. Although small differences were observed between the two load carriage conditions investigated in this study, results do not overwhelmingly support selection of one design over the other.

  • 3.
    Lundh, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Coleman, Scott
    Motion and Sports Lab, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.
    Riad, Jacques
    Orthopaedic Department, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Movement deviation and asymmetry assessment with three dimensional gait analysis of both upper- and lower extremity results in four different clinical relevant subgroups in unilateral cerebral palsy2014In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 381-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In unilateral cerebral palsy, movement pattern can be difficult to define and quantify. The aim was to assess the degree of deviation and asymmetry in upper and lower extremities during walking.

    Methods: Forty-seven patients, 45 Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS) I and 2 patients GMFCS 11, mean age 17.1 years (range 13.1 to 24.0) and 15 matched controls were evaluated. Gait profile score (GPS) and arm posture score (APS) were calculated from three-dimensional gait analysis (GA). Asymmetry was the calculated difference in deviation between affected and unaffected sides.

    Findings: The GPS was significantly increased compared to the control group on the affected side (6.93 (2.08) versus 4.23 (1.11) degrees) and on the unaffected side (6.67 (2.14)). The APS was also significantly increased on the affected side (10.39 (5.01) versus 5.52 (1.71) degrees) and on the unaffected side (7.13 (2.23)). The lower extremity asymmetry increased (significantly) in comparison with the control group (7.89 (3.82) versus 3.90 (1.01)) and correspondingly in the upper extremity (9.75 (4.62) versus 5.72 (1.84)). The GPS was not different between affected and unaffected sides, however the APS was different (statistically significant).

    Interpretation: We calculated deviation and asymmetry of movement during walking in unilateral CP, identifying four important clinical groups: close to normal, deviations mainly in the leg, deviations mainly in the arm and those with deviation in the arm and leg. This method can be applied to any patient group, and aid in diagnosing, planning treatment, and prognosis.

  • 4.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Thuesen, Anna Helena
    Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg
    Rusaw, David
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Effects of an unstable shoe construction on balance in women aged over 50 years.2010In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 455-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Shoes with an unstable sole construction are commonly used as a therapeutic tool by physiotherapists and are widely available from shoe and sporting goods retailers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of using an unstable shoe (Masai Barefoot Technology) on standing balance, reactive balance and stability limits. METHODS: Thirty-one subjects agreed to participate in the study and underwent balance tests on three different occasions. After test occasion one (baseline) 20 subjects received Masai Barefoot Technology shoes and were requested to wear them as much as possible for the remaining eight weeks of the study. Three specific balance tests were administered on each test occasion using a Pro Balance Master (NeuroCom International Inc., Oregon, USA). Tests included; a modified sensory organization test, reactive balance test and limits of stability test. FINDINGS: Subjects in the intervention group significantly improved their performance on elements of all three tests however results on these variables were not demonstrated to be significantly better than the control group. No significant differences were observed across testing occasions in the control group. INTERPRETATION: Results from the present study suggest that, for this group of individuals, use of unstable footwear may improve certain aspects of balance.

  • 5.
    Rusaw, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Sagittal plane position of the functional joint centre of prosthetic foot-ankle mechanisms2010In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 713-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of motion analysis techniques in amputee rehabilitation often utilizes kinematic data from the prosthetic limb. A problem with methods currently used is that the joint positions of the prosthetic ankle are assumed to be in the same position as that of an intact ankle. The aim of this study was to identify both traditional anatomical joint centres as well as functional joint centres in a selection of commonly used prosthetic feet. These coordinates were then compared across feet and compared to the contralateral intact ankle joint.

    Methods: Six prosthetic feet were !t to a unilateral trans-tibial amputee on two separate occasions. The subject's intact limb was used as a control. Three-dimensional kinematics were collected to determine the sagittal position of the functional joint centre for the feet investigated.

    Findings: None of the prosthetic feet had a functional joint centre that was within the 95% CI for that of an intact ankle (both x- and y-coordinate position), nor any of the other prosthetic feet investigated. The repeatability of the method was found to be adequate, with 95% CI of the difference (test–retest) of the prosthetic feet similar to that for the intact ankle and within clinically accepted levels of variability.

    Interpretation: The motion of the prosthetic feet tested is clearly different from that of an intact ankle. Kinematic methods that assume ankle constraints based on an intact ankle are subject to systematic error as this does not refect the real motion of the prosthetic foot.

  • 6.
    Rusaw, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ramstrand, Simon
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Validation of the Inverted Pendulum Model in standing for transtibial prosthesis users2016In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 31, p. 100-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In balance assessment it is often the case that variables associated with center of pressure are used as outcomes to draw conclusions about an individuals balance.  Validity of these outcomes rests upon assumptions that movement of the center of pressure is inter-dependent on movement of the center of mass.  This dependency is mechanical and is referred to as the Inverted Pendulum Model.  As prosthesis users lack an anatomical ankle it is not given this model is valid in this group.  The following study aimed to validate the Inverted Pendulum Model both kinematically and kinetically, in transtibial prosthesis users and a control group.  

    Methods: Prosthesis users (n=6) and matched control participants (n=6) stood quietly while force and motion data were collected under three sensory conditions (eyes-open, eyes-closed, and weight-bearing feedback) under both the prosthetic and intact limb.  Correlation coefficients were used to investigate the relationships between height of markers and center of masses and their excursion in the mediolateral/anteroposterior-directions, difference between center of pressure and center of mass and the center of mass acceleration in the mediolateral/anteroposterior directions, magnitude of the mediolateral/anteroposterior-component forces and center of mass acceleration, angular position of ankle and excursion in the mediolateral/anteroposterior-directions, and integrated force signals.  

    Findings: Results indicate kinematic validity of similar magnitudes (mean (SD) marker-displacement) between prosthesis users and control group for the mediolateral- (  = 0.77 (0.17); 0.74 (0.19)) and anteroposterior-directions (  = 0.88 (0.18); 0.88 (0.19)).  Correlation between the difference of center of pressure and center of mass and the center of mass acceleration was negligible on the prosthetic side (0.08 (0.06)) vs. the control group (-0.51(0.13)). 

    Interpretation: Results indicate kinematic validity of the Inverted Pendulum Model in transtibial prosthesis users but that kinetic validity is questionable, particularly on the side with a prosthesis.

1 - 6 of 6
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