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  • 1.
    Björklund, Margereth
    et al.
    Centre for Health Promotion Research, Halmstad University.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Centre for Health Promotion Research, Halmstad University.
    Cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour and health promotion activities: a critical incident analysis1999In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with head and neck cancer report several disease- and health-related problems before, during and a long time after completed treatment. Nurses have an important role in educating/supporting these patients about/through the disease and treatment so that they can attain well-being. This study describes the cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour in terms of critical incidents after nurses had given them care to promote health. The study had a qualitative, descriptive design and the method used was the critical incident technique. Twenty-one informants from the Nordic countries diagnosed with head and neck cancer were strategically selected. It was explained to the informants what a critical incident implies before the interviews took place; this was defined as a major event of great importance, an incident, which the informants still remember, due to its great importance for the outcome of their health and well-being. The nurses' behaviour was examined, and critical incidents were involved in 208 cases-150 positive and 58 negative ones-the number of incidents varying between three and 20 per informant. The nurses' health promotion activities or lack of such activities based on the patients' disease, treatment and symptoms, consisted of informing and instructing the patients as well as enabling their participation. Personal consideration and the nurses' cognisance, knowledge, competence, solicitude, demeanour and statements of understanding were found to be important. Continuous health promotion nursing interventions were of considerable value for the majority of this group of cancer patients. Oncology nurses could reconfirm and update the care of head and neck cancer patients by including health promotion activities in individual care plans. By more frequent use of health promotion models, such as the empowerment model, the nurses could identify and focus on those individuals who needed to alter their life-style as well as tailor their approach towards these patient by setting goals for well-being and a healthy life-style.

  • 2.
    Brobäck, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Berterö, Carina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    How next of kin experience palliative care of relatives at home2003In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Persson, Lars-Olof
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie
    School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Patient-reported stressful events and coping strategies in post-menopausal women with breast cancer2016In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 324-333Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Browall, Maria
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Persson, L. -O
    Ahlberg, K.
    Karlsson, P.
    Danielson, E.
    Daily assessment of stressful events and coping among post-menopausal women with breast cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy: Original article2009In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 507-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was twofold: to examine what type of daily stressful events post-menopausal woman with breast cancer experience during adjuvant chemotherapy and how bothersome these are and to identify coping strategies used by these women used to manage such stressful events. The patient group comprised 75 consecutively invited women (≥55 years of age) at two university hospitals and one county hospital in Sweden. The Daily Coping Assessment was used to collect data over time. Data were analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Six categories of stressful events were identified: 'nausea and vomiting', 'fatigue', 'other symptoms', 'isolation and alienation', 'fear of the unknown' and 'being controlled by the treatment'. The first three categories were subsumed under the domain physical problems and the latter three under psychosocial problems. Almost 30% of the diary entries recorded no stressful event. Physical problems were three times as frequent as psychosocial problems. 'Nausea/vomiting' was the most frequently observed stressful event (21.6%). 'Isolation and alienation' and 'fear of the unknown' were less frequent, but when they occurred they were rated as the most distressing. Several coping strategies were used to manage each stressful event. The most common strategies were acceptance, relaxation and distraction. Religion was rarely used as a coping strategy. 

  • 5.
    Molassiotis, A.
    et al.
    School of Nursing, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Ozden, G.
    Gazi University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
    Platin, N.
    School of Health Sciences, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Scott, J. A.
    Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Pud, D.
    Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Fernandez-Ortega, P.
    Institut Català Oncologia ICO, Barcelona, Spain.
    Milovics, L.
    Department of Education, Institute for Oncology and Radiology, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Panteli, V.
    Greek Oncology Nursing Society, Athens, Greece.
    Gudmundsdottir, G.
    Department of Oncology, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Browall, Maria
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Madsen, E.
    Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Patiraki, E.
    Greek Oncology Nursing Society, Athens, Greece.
    Kearney, N.
    Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with head and neck cancers in Europe2006In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to examine the patterns of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in a sample of head and neck cancer patients, forming part of a larger study. A cross-sectional survey design was used collecting data through a descriptive 27-item questionnaire in nine countries in Europe. The participants were 75 patients with head and neck cancers. The prevalence rate of CAM use was 22.7%. The most common therapies used were herbal medicine (47%), medicinal teas (23.5%), use of vitamins/minerals (11.8%) and visualization (11.8%). Use of CAM dramatically increased after the diagnosis with cancer (i.e. eightfold increase in the use of herbs). A profile of CAM users was not evident in this sample. Patients used CAM for a variety of reasons together, with counteracting the ill effects from cancer and its treatment being the most common one. Information about CAM was obtained mostly from friends and family. As one in five head and neck cancer patients use CAM it is important that clinicians explore practices with their patients, improve communication about CAM with them and assist those who want to use CAM in using appropriate and safe therapies.

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