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  • 1.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ohayon, M. M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Jernelöv, S.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Huddinge Hospital, Region Stockholm, M58, Stockholm, SE-141 86, Sweden.
    Kaldo, V.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Huddinge Hospital, Region Stockholm, M58, Stockholm, SE-141 86, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Reply to Liu et al.: “Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis”2022In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 66, article id 101699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Jafari, E.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ohayon, M. M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Blom, K.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm.
    Jernelöv, S.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm.
    Kaldo, V.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 64, article id 101646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) have consistently been shown to improve insomnia symptoms and other health-related outcomes, but the effects on QoL have been inconsistent. Many factors including the type CBT-I delivery and type of instrument used to assess QoL make the topic complex. The present systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized the evidence of CBT-I efficacy on QoL outcomes across different populations, delivery modes, and methodological aspects. Following the guidelines on preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), a literature search was conducted through PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and PsycINFO using keywords from relevant MeSH terms based on PICOS (Participants, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome and Study) criteria. Clinical trials investigating the effect of CBT-I as an intervention on QoL with any kind of control group were eligible if they reported mean scores and variation of QoL. Meta-analysis using a random-effect model was conducted to calculate the standardized mean differences (SMDs) in a set including all identified studies, as well as in three sub-sets: face-to-face CBT-I using randomized controlled trials (RCTs), online CBT-I using RCTs, and one-group pre- and post-treatment design. A total of 24 studies comprising 1977 participants (808 in an intervention group) from 12 countries were eligible for meta-analysis. The overall pooled estimate of SMD of QoL when all 24 studies were included was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.22; 0.72; I2 = 84.5%; tau2 = 0.31; p < 0.001). The overall pooled estimate of SMD of QoL was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.01–0.90; I2 = 87.5%; tau2 = 0.48, p < 0.001) for intervention groups with face-to-face CBT-I compared to controls; 0.47 (95% CI: 0.02–0.92; I2 = 88.3%; tau2 = 0.36; p = 0.04) for intervention groups with digital CBT-I compared to controls, and 0.46 (95% CI: 0.12–0.80; I2 = 52.9%; tau2 = 0.07; p = 0.08) for one-group pre- and post-comparison using CBT-I intervention compared to baseline. Moreover, effects of CBT-I on QoL were different across populations (pooled SMD = 0.59 for patients with insomnia; 0.29 for patients with insomnia comorbid with another major disorder; and 0.48 for other conditions) and types of QoL instruments (pooled SMD = 0.36 for disease-specific QoL instrument not on insomnia, 0.43 for generic QoL instrument, and 0.67 for a single-QoL-item instrument). The probability of publication bias was ruled out in overall and design specific sub-group analysis based on funnel plot and Egger's test. In conclusion, this meta-analysis confirmed a moderate, overall effect of CBT-I in improving QoL. However, due to small power and heterogeneity, future studies are needed to better explore the impact of moderating factors such as mode of delivery and type of QoL measure for assessment used.

  • 3.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bajalan, Zahra
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Ohayon, Maurice M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Internet addiction and sleep problems: A systematic review and meta-analysis2019In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 47, p. 51-61Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathological use of the internet – conceptualized as ‘internet addiction’ – might be crucial in initiating and increasing sleep disturbances in the community. While inconsistent evidence is reported regarding the association of internet addiction and sleep disturbances, the severity of this association remains unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to increase our understanding of the relationship between internet addiction and sleep disturbances. A systematic review was conducted through Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge, and EMBASE using keywords related to internet addiction and sleep problems. Observational studies (cohort, case-control or cross-sectional studies) focusing on association between internet addiction and sleep disturbances including sleep problems and sleep duration were selected. A meta-analysis using random-effect model was conducted to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for experiencing sleep problems and standardized mean differences (SMDs) for sleep duration. Eligible studies (N = 23) included 35,684 participants. The overall pooled OR of having sleep problems if addicted to the internet was 2.20 (95% CI: 1.77–2.74). Additionally, the overall pooled SMDs for sleep duration for the IA group compared to normal internet users was −0.24 (95% CI: −0.38, −0.10). Results of the meta-analysis revealed a significant OR for sleep problems and a significant reduced sleep duration among individuals addicted to the internet.

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  • 4.
    Beute, Femke
    et al.
    LightGreen Health, Rena, Norway.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    The importance of residential dusk and dawn light exposure for sleep quality, health, and well-being2023In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 72, no December, article id 101865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light exposure during twilight plays a critical role in the entrainment of the human circadian system. People are most often at home during dusk and dawn, and light exposure at home – either natural or from electric light – may therefore contribute substantially to sleep and well-being. However, very little research has focused on the effects of home lighting on sleep and well-being, and even less research has investigated the effects of light exposure during twilight. Therefore, a literature study was performed to collect studies on light exposure at home during dusk and dawn. Studies looking at light exposure during dusk and dawn have focused on either electric light intervention (i.e., dusk and dawn simulation) at home or in the laboratory or daylight exposure in the bedroom (i.e., the presence and type of curtains in the bedroom). Most research has focused on dawn simulation during the darker months of the year, often using sunrise alarms. In general, study results pointed to the importance of twilight light exposure at home for sleep and well-being. These results may depend on the characteristics of the user, such as age or chronotype.

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