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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Psychological Stress in Children May Alter the Immune Response2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and β-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, β-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p < 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing β cells.

  • 2. Hadrup, Sine Reker
    et al.
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Køllgaard, Tania
    Seremet, Tina
    Johansson, Boo
    Pawelec, Graham
    thor Straten, Per
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Longitudinal studies of clonally expanded CD8 T cells reveal a repertoire shrinkage predicting mortality and an increased number of dysfunctional cytomegalovirus-specific T cells in the very elderly.2006In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 176, no 4, p. 2645-2653Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson-Bowers, Anette
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi Lymphocytes Are in General Not Influenced by Isolation and Long-Term Cryopreservation2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 6, p. 1799-1809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several key factors can affect the outcome of immunological studies; isolation/cryopreservation can possibly alter T, B, NK, and T-regulatory (Treg) cell marker expression patterns. Blood samples from 50 blood donors supplemented with Na-heparin or K2EDTA were handled within 4 and 24 h after blood sampling. PBMC were isolated with different density gradients. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular and extracellular CD markers was performed on blood samples freshly isolated PBMC, and PBMC was thawed 6 and 12 mo post-cryopreservation for the purpose of identifying B, NK, Th, T-cytotoxic, and Treg cells. No differences were observed in the percentages for CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, or CD56+CD16+ cells within 24 h of sampling regardless of which supplement or isolation techniques were used. Differentiated (diff) CD4+ cells were in general less affected by isolation and cryopreservation than diff CD8+ cells. Terminally diff effector CD4+ and CD8+ cells were not affected by either isolation of lymphocytes or cryopreservation. In contrast, naive and early-diff effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ cells were affected by isolation and cryopreservation. The percentages of Treg cells defined as CD4+CD25hi expressing CD101 or CD129, CD4+CD25hiCD127, and CD4+CD25hiCD127FOXP3+, respectively, remained stable after isolation and cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD127, with or without FOXP3, were not affected by isolation/cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD39, contrary to CD45RA, on CD4+CD25+CD127 cells with or without FOXP3 were not affected by either isolation or cryopreservation. In conclusion, subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi lymphocytes are in general not influenced by isolation and long-term cryopreservation.

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