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  • 1.
    Berg, Mari-Ann
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Toward Creative Understanding: Bakhtin and the Study of Old Age in Literature1996In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Harnett, Tove
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Seeking exemptions from nursing home routines: Residents' everyday influence attempts and institutional order2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 292-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using ethnographic data collected from a Swedish nursing home, this article analyzes residents’ everyday or subtle influence attempts relative to the maintenance of institutional routines. Residents’ efforts to carve out some autonomy or fulfill personal preferences in everyday matters could be categorized as (1) disruptions, (2) disturbances, or (3) “good matches” relative to ongoing and up-coming nursing home routines. Striking disruptions were often fruitless, while attempts rendered as disturbances were typically postponed or modified. In general, the outcomes of residents’ maneuvers were shaped by brief and situational negotiations of whether (and how) temporary exemptions from the institutional order were deemed accountable or not by the staff. Although staff sometimes arranged situations in which residents were given some defined or symbolic decision-making authority, the findings of this study show how an inflexible local routine culture can constitute a constraining and only occasionally porous framework for residents’ self constructions and everyday life.

  • 3.
    Lundin, Anette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Berg, Lars-Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Department of Sociology (Faculty of Social Sciences), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH)2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence.

  • 4. Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Assessment for home care: Negotiating solutions for individual needs.2006In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 367-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores care management as an activity that regulates the distribution of society's resources for home care. It focuses on interaction in assessment meetings, which are part of the planning of services and care for old people in Sweden. The aim was to acquire an understanding of how old people, as applicants, account for their needs for care, and how these accounts are negotiated and positioned in talk. Twenty home care assessments were audio-taped and the data were analyzed using discursive analysis. It was found that the assessment meetings had an institutional structure within, which old people, as applicants and with individual needs for care, were assessed within fixed institutional categories. Furthermore, analysis showed how interaction during assessment meetings functioned as formal problem-solving, in which applicants' accounts of their health issues were negotiated, contributing to the construction of their identity as home care receivers

  • 5.
    Persson, Tove
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Wästerfors, David
    Sociologiska institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Such Trivial Matters: How staff account for restrictions of residents' influence in nursing homes2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National policies emphasize older people’s right to autonomy, yet nursing home residents often have restricted opportunities to make decisions about everyday matters. We use qualitative interview data to analyze staff members’ explanations of actions that conflict with both social norms and national policies. Two types of problematic actions are discussed: restrictions of elderly residents’ influence in decision making and neglect of residents' complaints. While staff members describe residents’ influence as desirable, they simultaneously formulate accounts that justify their inability to live up to this ideal. Further, we demonstrate how certain complaints are “made trivial” when they are described and treated in particular ways by the staff. We argue that the accounts offered by staff members draw on an implicit folk logic, a logic in which residents are allowed to exercise influence only as long as it does not conflict with the efficient running of the institution as a whole.

  • 6.
    Pietilä, Sirpa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Older twins' experiences of the relationship with their co-twin over the life course2012In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 35 life stories of aging twins, this study focuses on personal experiences and recollections of their relationships with the co-twin over the life course. The participants are part of two longitudinal Swedish twin studies on aging, SATSA and Gender. In the narrative analysis, three relationship patterns, labeled ‘nurturing’, ‘draining’, and ‘superficial’, emerged, pointing to qualitative aspects in the co-twin relationship. The dominating aspect was emotional closeness, which differed in the three relationship patterns. In the nurturing twin relationship pattern, emotional closeness was experienced as intimacy and yet independence, while in the draining relationship pattern it was experienced as dependence. The superficial twin relationship was experienced as distant and lacking in emotional involvement. Most of the relationship patterns seemed to remain the same throughout life. However, seen from a life course perspective, this study pointed to complexity and diversity in lifelong twin relationships.

  • 7.
    Pietilä, Sirpa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    'We are not as alike, as you think' sense of individuality within the co-twin relationship along the life course2013In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have explored how older twins experience and describe themselves in relation to their co-twin. The life stories of 20 older twins were analyzed with narrative analysis.

    Results showed that the twins described themselves from the point of differences in relation to the co-twin. This was based on experiences of how other people viewed them as alike, as well as on life events along the life course, which contributed to the perception of oneself as an individual in relation to the co-twin. The emphasis on unlikeness was therefore interpreted as a way of trying to establish a position as an individual within the co-twin relationship and to assert ones individuality to the rest of the social environment. To claim oneself as an individual was an ongoing identity work along the life course.

  • 8.
    Wilińska, Monika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    "Classic ageism" or "brutal economy"?- Old age and older people in the Polish media2010In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores media discourse of ageing, taking the example of Poland and relating it to a broader discussion of ageing policy. The discourse in news magazines appears both to reflect and create attitudes towards older people, which in turn has implications for ageing policy. To reveal the nature of these attitudes, we use a method of attitudinal positioning. The study analyzes articles that appeared in the four largest Polish weekly opinion news magazines, in the 2004–2007 period. Various domains in the discourse of ageing are identified, yet only the family and market domains seem to be described in exclusively positive terms: the authors discuss the implications of this for ageing policy.

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