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  • 1.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Review: Dunkle, Haug, Rosenberg (Eds.): Communications Technology and Elderly. Issues and Forecasts1985In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 509-510Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Borell, Klas
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Book Review: Mike Hepworth, Stories of Ageing2003In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 263-264Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3. Davey, Adam
    et al.
    Savla, Jyoti
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Zarit, Steven H.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    How equitable is Sweden's changing care-mix?: Linking individual and regional characteristics over time2007In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 511-532Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Harnett, Tove
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Jönson, Håkan
    Socialhögskolan, Lunds Universitet.
    That’s not my Robert!: Identity maintenance and other warrants in family members’ claims about mistreatment in old age care2010In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 627-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has explored how family members of care recipients define and sustain claims of mistreatment in old-age care. Twenty-one informants were recruited from an association of relatives of care recipients in Sweden. Using argumentation analysis, four warrants about mistreatment were identified from the qualitative interview data: they referred to physical harm, psychological harm, social-care deficiencies and identity subversion. The first three categories are similar to those recognised in previous research on elder mistreatment, but the fourth, which is described in detail in the article, is less familiar : eldermistreatment as the violation of an older person’s identity. The family members backed their claims about staff members’ violation of a care recipient’s persona or identity by using arguments that drew on their unique knowledge of the care recipient’s appearance, daily routines and preferred activities. They also described their attempts to protect the dignity and identity of a care recipient, their fears of abuse, and actual cases of conflict and retribution by care staff. They consistently positioned themselves as guardians of identity through their claims of mistreatment. The study provides important knowledge about family members’ moral view of elder mistreatment, which may enhance the understanding of conflicts between formal care providers and family members.

  • 5.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Hassing, Linda
    State provision down, offspring's up: the reverse substitution of old-age care in Sweden2003In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Balancing family and state care: Neither, either or both?: The case of Sweden2006In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 767-782Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Tortosa, Maria Angeles
    The effects of rationing home help services in Spain and Sweden: a comparative analysis1999In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 343-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both Spain and Sweden the most important public support for older people that is provided in their own homes are home-help services. In Sweden, these programmes were expanded in years of economic growth but recently have radically declined. Spain still strives to expand them in spite of financial problems. Both countries ration these services but in different ways. Spain provides relatively few hours of help with household tasks, primarily to poor old people. At present, one to two per cent of the 65-plus population is covered. Local government is still trying to reach more people to relieve pressure on limited institutional care. Sweden continues to cut down the service from the present coverage of nine per cent of the 65-plus population. It is focusing on the oldest and frailest people of all social classes who live alone. It is gradually being transformed into home health care. Institutional care has not been cut back to the same degree. Spain uses strict needs assessments and eligibility criteria to target clients. Sweden has sharpened its needs assessments and raised fees to discourage users with lesser needs.

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