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  • 1.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Shaw, Benjamin A.
    School of Public Health, University at Albany, Rensselaer, NY, USA.
    Trajectories of social activities from middle age to old age and late-life disability: a 36-year follow-up2013In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 790-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to examine the association between 34-year trajectories of social activity, from middle age to old age and late-life disability.

    METHODS: data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) were used. LNU data from 1968, 1981, 1991 and 2000 were merged with SWEOLD data from 1992, 2002 and 2004 to create a longitudinal data set with five observation periods. Trajectories of social activities covered 1968-2002, and late-life disability was measured in 2004. The sample consisted of 729 individuals aged 33-61 at baseline (1968), who participated in at least four observation periods and who were free from mobility limitations at baseline. Four trajectories of social activity were identified and used as predictors of late-life disability.

    RESULTS: reporting low/medium levels of social activity from mid-life to old age was the most common trajectory group. Persons reporting continuously low/medium or decreasing levels of social activity had higher odds ratios for late-life disability (OR = 2.33 and OR = 2.15, respectively) compared with those having continuously high levels of activity, even when adjusting for age, sex and mobility limitations, and excluding persons with baseline mobility limitations.

    CONCLUSIONS: results suggest that the disability risk associated with social activities is related to recent levels of activity, but also that risk may accumulate over time, as indicated by the higher disability risk associated with the continuously low/medium level social activity trajectory.

  • 2.
    Berg, Stig
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Svensson, Torbjörn
    An orientation scale for geriatric patients1980In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 215-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Dahl, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Hassing, Linda
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Agreement between self-reported and measured height, weight and body mass index in old age: a longitudinal study with 20 years of follow-up2010In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 445-451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Starr, John M.
    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh.
    Pattie, Alison
    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh.
    Deary, Ian
    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh.
    Cognitive consequences of overweight and obesity in the ninth decade of life?2015In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: the association between late-life obesity and late-life cognitive abilities is poorly understood. We studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and cognitive change in longitudinal population-based study spanning over the ninth decade of life.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: in total, 475 participants free of dementia at baseline from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (mean age: 79.1 years, SD: 0.6) were included. Height and weight were assessed at baseline. BMI was calculated as kg/m(2). Cognitive abilities were assessed at age ∼11 years and at age ∼79, ∼83, ∼87 and ∼90 years.

    RESULTS: latent growth models showed that men being overweight and obese had a 0.65 (SD: 0.3) and 1.10 (SD: 0.5) points less steep decline in general cognitive ability (as measured by the Moray House Test) for each year than people of normal weight. These associations were to some extent confounded by childhood intelligence. No other association between BMI and cognition was significant, either for men or women. People who were obese in old age had significantly lower childhood intelligence (m = 43.6, SD: 1.3) than people who were normal in weight (m = 47.0, SD: 0.8) and persons being overweight (m = 47.5, SD: 0.8), F (472, 3) = 3.2, P = 0.043.

    CONCLUSIONS: the current study shows weak or no evidence for an association between BMI in old age and cognitive function, especially not when childhood intelligence is controlled for. Lower intelligence at the age of 11 years predicted obesity at the age of 79 years.

  • 5.
    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Modéer, Ingrid Nilsson
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Farahmand, Bahman
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Religa, Dorota
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksdotter, Maria
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Differences in diagnostic process, treatment and social support for Alzheimer's dementia between primary and specialist care: results from the Swedish Dementia Registry2017In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 314-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's dementia (AD) has shifted the burden of management towards primary care (PC). Our aim is to compare diagnostic process and management of AD in PC and specialist care (SC).

    DESIGN: cross-sectional study.

    SUBJECTS: a total of, 9,625 patients diagnosed with AD registered 2011-14 in SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry.

    METHODS: descriptive statistics are shown. Odds ratios are presented for test performance and treatment in PC compared to SC, adjusted for age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and number of medication.

    RESULTS: a total of, 5,734 (60%) AD patients from SC and 3,891 (40%) from PC. In both, 64% of patients were women. PC patients were older (mean age 81 vs. 76; P < 0.001), had lower MMSE (median 21 vs. 22; P < 0.001) and more likely to receive home care (31% vs. 20%; P < 0.001) or day care (5% vs. 3%; P < 0.001). Fewer diagnostic tests were performed in PC and diagnostic time was shorter. Basic testing was less likely to be complete in PC. The greatest differences were found for neuroimaging (82% in PC vs. 98% in SC) and clock tests (84% vs. 93%). These differences remained statistically significant after adjusting for MMSE and demographic characteristics. PC patients received less antipsychotic medication and more anxiolytics and hypnotics, but there were no significant differences in use of cholinesterase inhibitors between PC and SC.

    CONCLUSION: primary and specialist AD patients differ in background characteristics, and this can influence diagnostic work-up and treatment. PC excels in restriction of antipsychotic use. Use of head CT and clock test in PC are areas for improvement in Sweden.

  • 6. Hassing, Linda B
    et al.
    Hofer, Scott M
    Nilsson, Sven
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    McClearn, Gerald
    Johansson, Boo
    Comorbid Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Exacerbates Cognitive Decline: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study2004In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 355-361Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linkoping University Hospital.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University.
    Broström, Anders
    Linkoping University Hospital.
    Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up2012In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 468-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: little is known about demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or central sleep apnoea (CSA) in community-dwelling elderly. We also examined these (OSA and CSA) associations to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality.

    METHODS: a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years.

    RESULTS: a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction <50% (LVEF <50%) ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and transient ischaemic attack (TIA)/stroke. There was no difference in the rate of IHD and TIA/stroke between OSA and no SDB, but more LVEF <50% was found in those with OSA. CSA significantly increased the risk for all-cause (P=0.002) and CV mortality (P=0.018) by more than two times. After adjustments for CV disease, diabetes and the biomarker NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide CSA associations to all-cause mortality and CV mortality lost significance.

    CONCLUSION: OSA, in persons >75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.

  • 8.
    Sternäng, Ola
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    University of California, Riverside, CA, USA.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Factors associated with grip strength decline in older adults2014In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 269-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: few studies have examined associations of multi-faceted demographic, health and lifestyle factors with longterm change in grip strength performance across the adult lifespan. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of risk factors in specific parts of the adult lifespan (e.g. in early midlife, in late midlife and in old adulthood) separately for women and men.

    Methods: data came from the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). Grip strength performance was followed in 849 participants who were 5088 years of age at baseline. The follow-up period with seven waves of data of grip strength was 22 years, and the risk factors were measured up to 20 years before the assessment of grip strength. Latent growth modelling was used for the longitudinal analyses.

    Results: a gender difference in the type of factors associated with grip strength performance and development across the adult lifespan was found. Significant factors for the age slopes for women were stress, smoking and dementia. For men, marital status, mean arterial pressure, physical activity at work and having a chronic disorder were of importance. These factors varied in their associations with grip strength across the adult lifespan.

    Conclusion: factors measured earlier in adulthood were associated with grip strength decline in late midlife and old adulthood. Gender-specific patterns of risk factors suggest that it may be worthwhile to conduct research on grip and muscle strength (and biological vitality) separately for men and women.

  • 9.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ageing is riskier than it looks (Commentary).1995In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 373-374Article in journal (Refereed)
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