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  • 1.
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande.
    En koloniverksamhets gränsarbete2007In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 4, p. 34-42Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 2.
    Westum, Asbjörg
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Om språkbruk, generaliseringar och ett besvärligt material2014In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with narratives from northern Sweden about the Spanish flu pandemic (1918– 1920). There are about 50 narratives collected between ca. 1950 and 1980. All of them were elicited in interviews: some were told in interaction with two or more informants, some are told by one informant in interaction with the interviewer, and some are monologues. There are different interviewers. The interviews have not been planned or conducted in a systematic and consistent way, or with a purpose to investigate the informants’ experiences of the Spanish flu. Rather, the main purpose seems to have been to elicit stories about “the old days”. Drawing on linguistic choices from the material as a whole, this article discusses the informants’ notion of the pandemic and their conceptions of etiology. The article concludes that the most conspicuous feature is what is not mentioned by any informant, namely the word influenza. Further, the Spanish flu clearly belongs to a past era that has no resemblance to modern society. It was an era characterized by suffering, poor sanitary conditions and starvation. As well, the article briefly discusses the critique of medical humanities and the study of illness narratives for the lack of systematic analyses and syntheses of how these are constructed in general.

  • 3.
    Westum, Asbjörg
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    I människan själv, eller utanför?: Föreställningar om pestens orsaker i lärda skrifter och folktro2015In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how the causes of Black death were conceived and discussed in two distinct contexts; learned sources from late medieval England and oral Swedish legends that were collected and recorded many centuries aftr the outbreak. While focused on discussions of a particular disease - plague or what is known as the bacterium yersinia pestis - the geographical, chronological and material range enables a greater perspective upon the continuities and transitions of how theories of causality are framed.

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