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  • 1.
    Chen, Janice D.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth 6845, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth 6845, Australia.
    Buzzard, Jennifer
    Ramsey Health, Hollywood Hospital, Perth 6009, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth 6845, Australia.
    Impact of experience when using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment to assess postural risk in children using information and communication technologies2014In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 398-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) is an observation-based screening tool that has been used to assess postural risks of children in school settings. Studies using eye-tracking technology suggest that visual search strategies are influenced by experience in the task performed. This study investigated if experience in postural risk assessments contributed to differences in outcome scores on the RULA and the visual search strategies utilized. While wearing an eye-tracker, 16 student occupational therapists and 16 experienced occupational therapists used the RULA to assess 11 video scenarios of a child using different mobile information and communication technologies (ICT) in the home environment. No significant differences in RULA outcome scores, and no conclusive differences in visual search strategies between groups were found. RULA can be used as a screening tool for postural risks following a short training session regardless of the assessor's experience in postural risk assessments. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Meroz, A.
    Margalit, A. E.
    Ratzon, N. Z.
    A validation study of the Keyboard Personal Computer Style instrument (K-PeCS) for use with children2012In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 985-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines a potential instrument for measurement of typing postures of children. This paper describes inter-rater, test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Keyboard Personal Computer Style instrument (K-PeCS), an observational measurement of postures and movements during keyboarding, for use with children. Two trained raters independently rated videos of 24 children (aged 7-10 years). Six children returned one week later for identifying test-retest reliability. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing ratings obtained using the K-PECS to scores from a 3D motion analysis system. Inter-rater reliability was moderate to high for 12 out of 16 items (Kappa: 0.46 to 1.00; correlation coefficients: 0.77-0.95) and test-retest reliability varied across items (Kappa: 0.25 to 0.67; correlation coefficients: r = 0.20 to r = 0.95). Concurrent validity compared favourably across arm pathlength, wrist extension and ulnar deviation. In light of the limitations of other tools the K-PeCS offers a fairly affordable, reliable and valid instrument to address the gap for measurement of typing styles of children, despite the shortcomings of some items. However further research is required to refine the instrument for use in evaluating typing among children.

  • 3.
    Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Unit of Ergonomics, School of Technology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Berglund, Martina
    Eklund, Jörgen
    HTO – A complementary ergonomics approach2017In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 59, Part A, p. 182-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of human factors and ergonomics constitutes a strong potential in systems analysis, design and improvement. However, it is difficult to communicate its potential value. This paper addresses how the human-technology-organization (HTO) concept can be defined and supports the understanding, communication and development of the systems' character and potential of human factors and ergonomics. Empirical examples from the authors’ experiences of working with the HTO concept in R&D and teaching are illustrated, including its usefulness as: 1) a conceptual model; 2) an analysis framework; 3) a meta methodology; 4) a pedagogical tool; and 5) a design tool. The use of HTO provides guidance on how the system can be designed to better support health, individual and systems performance. It is further suggested that there is a strong potential for developing the theory, applications and methodological aspects of HTO.

  • 4.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Working conditions and effects of ISO 9000 in six furniture making companies: implementation and processes1998In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What effects will the implementation of the quality standard ISO 9000 have regarding working conditions and competitive advantages? Which are the most important change process characteristics for assuring improved working conditions and other desired effects? These are the main questions behind this study of six furniture-making companies which implemented ISO 9000 during the period 1991-1994. The results show that customer requirement was the dominant goal to implement ISO 9000. Five of the six companies succeeded in gaining certification. The influence on working conditions was limited, but included better order and housekeeping, more positive attitudes towards discussing quality shortcomings, a few workplace improvements, work enrichment caused by additional tasks within the quality system and a better understanding of external customer demands. Among the negative effects were new, apparently meaningless, tasks for individual workers as well as more stress and more physically strenuous work. The effects on the companies included a decrease in external quality-related costs and improved delivery precision. The study confirms the importance for efficient change of the design of the change process, and identifies ‘improvement methodology’ as the most important process characteristic. Improved working conditions are enhanced by added relevant strategic goals and by a participative implementation process.

  • 5.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Vogel, K.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, STH, Unit of Ergonomics, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bergstrand, M.
    Avonova Hälsa, Motala, Sweden.
    Eklund, J.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, STH, Unit of Ergonomics, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter ability2016In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 56, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knife sharpness is imperative in meat cutting. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of knife blade steel quality with meat cutters' individual ability to maintain the cutting edge sharp in an industrial production setting. Twelve meat cutters in two different companies using three different knives during normal production were studied in this quasi-experimental study. Methods included were measuring knife cutting force before and after knife use, time knives were used, ratings of sharpness and discomfort and interviews. Results showed that the meat cutters' skill of maintaining sharpness during work had a much larger effect on knife sharpness during work than the knife steel differences. The ability was also related to feelings of discomfort and to physical exertion. It was found that meat cutters using more knives were more likely to suffer from discomfort in the upper limbs, which is a risk for developing MSD.

  • 6.
    Larsen, Louise B.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Duty belt or load-bearing vest? Discomfort and pressure distribution for police driving standard fleet vehicles2019In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 80, p. 146-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Police working in active duty have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, with lower back pain being the most frequently reported. As a part of uniform regulations, Swedish police are mandated to wear body armour and duty belts at all times during work. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different load carriage designs on in-vehicle sitting pressure and self-rated discomfort among police. Results showed less discomfort when wearing the alternate load carriage system incorporating a load-bearing vest and thigh holster compared to the standard load carriage system consisting of a duty belt. Pressures in the lower back were reduced when wearing the load-bearing vest whereas pressures in the upper back region increased. Relocating appointments away from the waist has the potential to improve sitting positions and the ergonomic situation for police when driving fleet vehicles.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-05-30 00:00
  • 7.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Zügner, Roland
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsen, Louise B.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Evaluation of load carriage systems used by active duty police officers: Relative effects on walking patterns and perceived comfort2016In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 53, no Part A, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effects of two different load carriage systems on gait kinematics, temporospatial gait parameters and self-reported comfort in Swedish police.

    Methods: 21 active duty police officers were recruited for this crossover study design. Biomechanical and self-report data was collected on two testing occasions. On occasion 1, three dimensional kinematic data was collected while police wore a/no equipment (control), b/their standard issues belt and ballistic protection vest and c/a load bearing vest with ballistic protection vest. Police then wore the load bearing vest for a minimum of 3 months before the second testing occasion.

    Results: The load bearing vest was associated with a significant reduction in range of motion of the trunk,´pelvis and hip joints. Biomechanical changes associated with the load bearing vest appeared to reduce with increased wear time. In both the standard issue belt condition and the load bearing vest condition, police walked with the arms held in a significantly greater degree of abduction. Self-report data indicated a preference for the load bearing vest.

    Conclusion: The two load carriage designs tested in this study were found to significantly alter gait kinematics.

    The load bearing vest design was associated with the greatest number of kinematic compensations however these reduced over time as police became more accustomed to the design. Results from this study do not support selection of one load carriage design over the other and providing individuals with the option to choose a load carriage design is considered appropriate.

  • 8.
    Vogel, K
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eklund, J
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Engkvist, I-L
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Improving meat cutters' work: Changes and effects following an intervention2013In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 996-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meat cutters face higher risks of injury and musculoskeletal problems than most other occupational groups. The aims of this paper were to describe ergonomics changes implemented in three meat cutting plants and to evaluate effects related to ergonomics on the individual meat cutters and their work. Data was collected by interviews, observations, document studies and a questionnaire (n = 247), as a post intervention study. The changes implemented consisted of reducing knife work to a maximum of 6 h per day and introducing a job rotation scheme with work periods of equal length. Tasks other than traditional meat cutting were added. A competence development plan for each meat cutter and easy adjustment of workplace height were introduced. The questionnaire showed a reduction in perceived physical work load. In general, the changes were perceived positively. Figures from the company showed a positive trend for injuries and sick leave.

1 - 8 of 8
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  • nn-NO
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