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  • 1. Aberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hepworth, Mike
    O'Reilly, Karen
    Lithell, Hans
    On loss of activity and independence, adaptation improves life satisfaction in old age: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions.2005In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 1111-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Chaplin, John
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wartenberg, Constanze
    Qual Registry Ctr West Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petersson, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Danielsson, Aina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Initial validation of Swedish PROMIS (R)-25 in an orthopaedic population of children with acute severe knee injury2018In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 1, p. S122-S122, article id 2107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The quality control of pediatric orthopaedic treatment options requires patient reported outcome measures that offer comparison to referenced populations. This study aimed to contribute to the validation of the Swedish translation of the norm-referenced PROMIS profile-25.

    Methods: Three questionnaires were administered one year after an acute knee injury via the Swedish paediatric orthopaedic registry (SPOQ). The questionnaires were: (1) The PROMIS Pediatric Profile-25, including the short-forms Mobility, Anxiety, Depression, Fatigue, Peer Relationships, Pain Interference and the single-item Pain Intensity, translated following the FACIT translation method, (2) the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome scales for children (KOOS-Child, previously validated in Swedish) with the scales Pain, Symptoms, ADL, Sport/play and QoL (39 questions), and (3) a single VAS item, Overall Health Scale. Convergent validity was assessed by interscale correlations and a one-way ANOVA was used to identify differences between three injury categories.

    Results: Of 218 eligible patients, 104 (53 girls, 9-14 years, mean 13 years, 42 with patella luxation, 34 with anterior cruciate ligament rupture and 28 with other knee injuries), returned questionnaires. PROMIS and KOOS-Child had 1% incomplete answers. There was high positive correlation between all KOOS-Child scales, and KOOS-Child-Pain explained a large amount of variance in Symptoms (R2 = .610), ADL (R2 = .648), Sport/play (R2 = .462) and QoL (R2 = .423). An expected high correlation between KOOS-Child-pain and PROMIS-Pain-Interference was found (r = .581, p = \.001). The expected relationship between the PROMIS-Mobility scale and KOOS-Child-QoL (r = .815, p = \.001) was found, confirming that at this age QoL is associated with physical functioning. There were statistically significant differences between the three diagnosis categories for two PROMIS scales: PROMIS-mobility (F(2, 101) = 6.901, p = .002) and PROMIS-depression (F(2, 101) = 3.116, p = .049). The PROMIS subscales showed high Cronbach’s alpha (between 0.730 and 0.864).

    Conclusions: This study is the first in Sweden to investigate the psychometric properties of the PROMIS profile-25 and highlights its relationship to the criterion measure of KOOS-Child. PROMIS-25 uses self-report, ultra-brief measurement for screening, providing additional information that was not available using previous questionnaires. PROMIS-25 can contribute to quality control and lead to improved treatment decisions. Data collection is ongoing through the orthopaedic registry, which will provide further evidence of how PROMIS-25 performs in other paediatric orthopaedic conditions.

  • 3.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Carlsson, M
    von Essen, L
    Kreuger, A
    Hamrin, E
    Development of a tool to measure the life situation of parents of children with cancer1997In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 248-256Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth K. F.
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Drug Res Clin Pharmacol, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Gunnel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Linköping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Drug Res Clin Pharmacol, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jaracz, Krystyna
    Poznan Univ Med Sci, Dept Neurol & Psychiat Nursing, Poznan, Poland.
    Quality of life among the elderly with locomotor disabilities in Sweden and Poland in the 1990s2012In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 281-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To estimate the proportion of locomotor disabilities in two elderly populations in Sweden and Poland, respectively. To estimate the perceived quality of life (QoL) in the disabled groups in samples from each country using a model developed by Carol Estwing Ferrans. Methods The study comprised three parts: an epidemiological screening test for identification of individuals with a locomotor disability, an analysis of background data of importance and home visits with evaluations of quality of life and functional capacity. Home visits were made using the Quality of Life Index, (QLI) of Ferrans and Powers and a functional scale, the Standardized Practical Equipment (SPE). Data were collected for the period 1991-1996. Results In the population part of the study, with 1,380 respondents (78%) comprising elderly Swedish persons, 288 reported a locomotor disability. This can be compared with 425 among 1,045 respondents (52%) in a Polish elderly group. The tests at the home visits (Sweden, n = 89; Poland, n = 84) showed that both men and women in the Swedish group reported significantly higher scores for the total QLI (max. 30.00) with men reporting 26.68 points compared to 19.73 and women reporting 21.39 points compared to 19.40 and for three of the four subscales. Also, the Polish group scored lower for balance and mobility (SPE). Conclusion The study provides an important view of the life situation measured with the QLI tool and the SPE for elderly persons with locomotor disorders in Sweden and Poland during the mid-1990s. The results are congruent with epidemiological reports on the poor health situation in Poland, particularly during that time. A new investigation among the elderly with locomotor disorders in the two countries today might provide different results.

  • 5. Hörnquist, J O
    et al.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hansson, B
    Andersson, P O
    Quality of life: status and change (QLsc) reliability, validity and sensitivity of a generic assessment approach tailored for diabetes.1993In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 263-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Modabbernia, Amirhossein
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
    Yaghoubidoust, Mohammadhossein
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Yin
    Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung Universtiy, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Michalak, Erin E.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Murray, Greg
    Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Quality of life in Iranian patients with bipolar disorder: a psychometric study of the Persian Brief Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder (QoL.BD)2016In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 1835-1844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To assess the reliability, validity, and factor structure of the Persian Brief Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder (QoL.BD) in Iranian patients with bipolar disorder (BD).

    Methods

    After translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brief QoL.BD, we administered the questionnaire to 184 patients diagnosed with BD. To determine factor structure, we performed both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. To investigate the reliability, we assessed internal consistency, reproducibility and agreement. Construct validity was assessed by calculating correlations between the Brief QoL.BD and the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Positive And Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form (Q-LES-Q-SF). We also investigated gender differences in interpretations of QoL.BD items.

    Results

    The results obtained from reliability analysis confirmed internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha was 0.87 and 0.89 for two assessments) and reproducibility and agreement (the intraclass correlation coefficient ranged between 0.74 and 0.94). Validity analyses showed that the items loaded on a single-factor structure. The inter-item correlations varied from 0.31 to 0.68. Significantly lower scores on the Brief QoL.BD were observed in people diagnosed with BD I compared to BD II. Significant correlations were observed between the Brief QoL.BD and SF-36 summary measures, HAMD, YMRS, Q-LES-Q-SF and PANAS subscales. Items in the Brief QoL.BD were interpreted similarly by men and women.

    Conclusions

    The Brief Persian QoL.BD is a psychometrically sound measure with acceptable validity and reliability and provides a rapid assessment tool for measuring QoL in patients with BD.

  • 7.
    Saffari, Mohsen
    et al.
    Health Research Center, Life Style Institute, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Chen, Hui
    School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    The role of religious coping and social support on medication adherence and quality of life among the elderly with type 2 diabetes.2019In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2183-2193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes is a major public health issue particularly in the elderly. Religion may affect the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in such patients, mediated by factors such as religious coping and social support. This study aimed to investigate the impact of religiosity on medication adherence and HRQoL.

    METHODS: 793 adults (> 65 years old, 45% females) were recruited from 4 diabetes care centers and followed for 1 year. Duke University Religion Index, Spiritual Coping Strategies, Multidimensional Perceived Social Support, Medication Adherence Report Scale, WHOQOL-BREF and Diabetes-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Module were used for assessment, as well as HbA1c and fasting blood glucose level. Using structural equation modeling, the potential paths were tested between religiosity, medication adherence and HRQoL; social support, religious coping and medication adherence served as the mediators.

    RESULTS: Religious coping and social support were recognized as the significant mediators between religiosity and medication adherence (CFI = 0.983, TLI = 0.985, and RMSEA = 0.021). The relationships between religiosity and HRQoL were considerably mediated by social support, religious coping and medication adherence and these variables explained 12% and 33% of variances of generic and specific HRQoL, respectively. There was no significant direct effect of religiosity on HRQoL. HbA1c and fasting blood glucose level were successfully loaded on the latent construct of medication adherence (factor loading = 0.51 and 0.44, respectively).

    CONCLUSIONS: The impact of religiosity on medication adherence and HRQoL occurs through the mediators such as religious coping and social support. Therefore, to improve the adherence to treatment and quality of life, interventions may be designed based on these mediators.

  • 8.
    Wikby, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hörnqvist, J O
    Stenström, Ulf
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Andersson, P O
    Background factors, long-term complications, quality of life and metabolic control in insulin dependent diabetes.1993In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 281-286Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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