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  • 1. Carlander, Ida
    et al.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Being Me and Being Us in a Family Close to Death at Home2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that every individual in the family had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether or not he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness. This was linked to ways of promoting the individual’s self-image, or “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” or in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

  • 2.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Mirjam, Ekstedt
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarenmalm, Elisabeth Kenne
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Mats, Christiansen
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Joakim, Öhlén
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Providing palliative care in a Swedish support home for people who are homeless2016In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1252-1262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person’s health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions.

  • 3. Pergert, Pernilla
    et al.
    Ekblad, Solveig
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Olle
    Protecting professional composure in transcultural pediatric nursing2008In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 647-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Sandgren, A
    et al.
    Thulesius, H
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö universitet.
    Petersson, K
    Striving for emotional survival in palliative cancer nursing2006In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 79-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Jacobsson, Christian
    Inst för psykologi, Göteborgs universitet.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Perceptions of life balance among a working population in Sweden2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 410-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A life in balance is commonly related to health and well-being. However, our knowledge regarding the perceptions of life balance among the general population is limited. Our aim was to explore the perception of life balance among working people without recent long-term sick leave. Individual interviews were conducted with 7 men and 12 women and analyzed according to grounded theory, aiming at achieving a description. The results showed that life balance includes four interrelated dimensions: activity balance, balance in body and mind, balance in relation to others, and time balance. Life balance was regarded by the participants as health related, promoted by a sense of security, and affected by context and individual strategies. Life balance was also seen as being individually defined and dynamic. The results indicate that the perceptions of life balance might be quite general because they show similarities with previous research on different populations.

  • 6. Åberg, AC
    et al.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Hepworth, M
    O'Reilly, K
    Lithell, H
    Continuity of the self in later life: perceptions of informal caregivers2004In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 792-815Article in journal (Refereed)
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