Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    The myth of the total institution: Written narratives of patients' views of sanatorium care 1908–19592016In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 153, p. 54-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on written narratives by 72 former sanatorium patients, this article explores, from patients' perspectives, the nature of the relationships between patients and staff in a Swedish sanatorium during the first half of the twentieth century. These narratives are discussed in the context of the total institution. This article suggests that this phenomenon was marked by inconsistencies that can be understood in terms of its situational and contradictory characteristics. Simultaneously, these narratives are in opposition to the assumption of the static and powerless patient adapted only to suit the logic of the institution.

  • 2.
    Bolin, Kristian
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lindgren, Björn
    Lund University.
    Lindström, Martin
    Lund University.
    Nystedt, Paul
    University of Linköping.
    Investments in social capital - Implications of social interactions for the production of health2003In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 2379-2390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a theoretical model of the family as producer of health- and social capital. There are both direct and indirect returns on the production and accumulation of health- and social capital. Direct returns (the consumption motives) result since health and social capital both enhance individual welfare per se. Indirect returns (the investment motives) result since health capital increases the amount of productive time, and social capital improves the efficiency of the production technology used for producing health capital. The main prediction of the theoretical model is that the amount of social capital is positively related to the level of health; individuals with high levels of social capital are healthier than individuals with lower levels of social capital, ceteris paribus. An empirical model is estimated, using a set of individual panel data from three different time periods in Sweden. We find that social capital is positively related to the level of health capital, which supports the theoretical model. Further, we find that the level of social capital (1) declines with age, (2) is lower for those married or cohabiting, and (3) is lower for men than for women.

  • 3.
    Calltorp, Johan
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    How can our health systems be re-engineered to meet the future challenges?: The Swedish experience2012In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 677-679Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Andel, Ross
    University of South Florida and International Clinical Research Center, Tampa, USA.
    Celeste, Roger Keller
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Faculdade de Odontologia, Department Preventive and Social Dentistry, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Linking financial hardship throughout the life-course with psychological distress in old age: Sensitive period, accumulation of risks, and chain of risks hypotheses.2018In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Elsevier, Vol. 201, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective was to investigate the life course hypotheses - sensitive period, chain of risks, and accumulation of risks - in relation to financial hardship and psychological distress in old age. We used two Swedish longitudinal surveys based on nationally representative samples. The first survey includes people 18-75 years old with multiple waves, the second survey is a longitudinal continuation, including people 76 + years old. The analytical sample included 2990 people at baseline. Financial hardship was assessed in childhood (retrospectively), at the mean ages of 54, 61, 70, and 81 years. Psychological distress (self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms) was assessed at the same ages. Path analysis with WLSMV estimation was used. There was a direct path from financial hardship in childhood to psychological distress at age 70 (0.26, p = 0.002). Financial hardship in childhood was associated with increased risk of psychological distress and financial hardship both at baseline (age 54), and later. Financial hardship, beyond childhood, was not independently associated with psychological distress at age 81. Higher levels of education and employment decreased the negative effects of financial hardship in childhood on the risk of psychological distress and financial hardship later on. There was a bi-directional relationship between psychological distress and financial hardship; support for health selection was slightly higher than for social causation. We found that psychological distress in old age was affected by financial hardship in childhood through a chain of risks that included psychological distress earlier in life. In addition, financial hardship in childhood seemed to directly affect psychological distress in old age, independent of other measured circumstances (i.e., chains of risks). Education and employment could decrease the effect of an adverse financial situation in childhood on later-life psychological distress. We did not find support for accumulation of risks when including tests of all hypotheses in the same model.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-02-17 00:00
  • 5. Dozet, A
    et al.
    Lyttkens, C.H.
    Nystedt, Paul
    University of Linköping.
    Health care for the elderly: Two cases of technology diffusion2002In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 49-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion of medical technology and the growing proportion of elderly people in the population are generally regarded as major contributors to the increasing health care expenditure in the industrialised world. This study explores the importance of one specific factor in this process, the change in the use of technology among elderly patients. In some instances, a new technology is first used among younger patients and then gradually extended to the elderly. Two such cases are studied, both representing costly procedures: coronary bypass surgery (treatment of coronary heart disease) and dialysis (treatment of uraemia). In both cases, we demonstrate significant diffusion to older age groups. It is also tentatively concluded that the diffusion of technology could have an important effect on per capita health care expenditure among the oldest of the old.

  • 6.
    Josephson, Irene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Regional Development of County of Jönköping Council.
    Woodward-Kron, Robyn
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Delany, Clare
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Hiller, Amy
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Evaluative language in physiotherapy practice: How does it contribute to the therapeutic relationship?2015In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 143, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In physiotherapy, the therapeutic relationship - in which a therapist and patient work together to achieve treatment goals is increasingly seen as the foundation of patient care. How the therapeutic relationship is established and enacted, however, is not well understood. One way to better understand the nature of the relationship is to examine how therapists and patients evaluate and inform each other about the patient's physical capacity, sensation, and emotions. As the patient and therapist's talk is the primary means to realise and exchange such evaluations, our focus is on evaluative language used by the therapist and patient in their interactions. The aim of this paper is to examine the language and function of evaluation in physiotherapy consultations. The study is a discourse analytic one using Appraisal Theory. In Appraisal Theory, language resources that speakers use to construe evaluations such as emotions, judgments of behaviour and aesthetics are expressed as a system. The sub-systems are AFFECT (expressing emotion), JUDGMENT (assessing behaviour) and APPRECIATION (evaluating processes and objects). The data are a convenience sample of 18 consultations from two cultural and therapeutic settings: primary healthcare (Sweden, Australia); and hospital rehabilitation (Australia). The findings show that both patient and therapist utilise all sub-systems of Appraisal; however, use of the sub-systems by the therapist and patient differs functionally. JUDGMENT and APPRECIATION play a central role in therapists' co-construction of patients' physical history and presenting problem. In contrast, patient AFFECT evaluations, mainly to do with emotions about loss of capacity and pain, are generally not followed up by the therapist. The findings suggest that while patients engage with the therapeutic relationship from a clinical and interpersonal perspective, therapists are more narrowly focused on their own clinical tasks. The study findings have implications for understandings of the therapeutic relationship in physiotherapy and can inform teaching.

  • 7.
    Nystedt, Paul
    University of Linköping.
    Martial life course events and smoking behaviour in Sweden 1980-20002006In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 1427-1442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The protective effect of marriage on smoking has been extensively established in the literature. However, less is known about the dynamics of how smoking behaviour is connected to various marital life course events, and whether there are any gender discrepancies in this respect. In this article the connection between the marital life course and smoking is analysed from a stress-related perspective controlling for other socio-economic characteristics. We use information on 81,000 individuals from the Swedish longitudinal micro-level ULF (Survey of Living Conditions) database 1980-2000, which is randomly drawn from the sample population of all Swedes aged 16-84. Logistic regressions on current smoking status and changes in smoking behaviour of participants in the panel part of the data are estimated. The marital life course is strongly linked to smoking behaviour with being or getting married indicating low smoking risks and marital disruption indicating high risks. The divorced smoke to a higher extent than the widowed and there are signs that getting divorced implies higher risks than becoming widowed, both of taking up/relapsing and, for women, not being able to quit. Further, the results indicate that the connection between smoking cessation and living with a partner is stronger for men, whereas women are more affected by the propensity to start smoking after marital disruption. The protective effect of being married on smoking decreases with the age difference between spouses in households where the wife is older than the husband. Taken together, the results yield a rather complex pattern of smoking behaviour over the marital life course. Further, perceived financial stress is strongly connected to smoking and not being able to quit. Controlling for this effect still leaves a socio-economic status gradient in smoking.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf