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  • 1.
    Cohen-Holzer, Marilyn
    et al.
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Katz-Leurer, Michal
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Meyer, Shirley
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Center for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Parush, Shula
    School of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine of Hadassah and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
    The effect of bimanual training with or without constraint on hand functions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: A non-randomized clinical trial2017In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 516-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To compare the effect of bimanual training with or without constraint on manual functions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP).

    Methods:

    Seventeen children aged 6–11 years with UCP participated in one of two intensive therapeutic camps: bimanual (n = 9) incorporating one hour of constraint (“Hybrid”) or Bimanual (n = 8). Each camp met for 2 weeks, 5 days per week for 6 hours each day. The Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and the Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF) examined bimanual and unimanual functions pre, post- and 3-months post-intervention.

    Results:

    A significant improvement was noted in AHA scores for both groups between the pre-, post- and three months post-intervention [Hybrid (F2; 16 = 85.5, p < 0.01); Bimanual (F2; 16 = 15.4, p < 0.01)] with no significant differences between groups over time (F2; 30 = 0.74, p = 0.48). For the JTTHF, a significant improvement was noted in the affected hand following the Hybrid program (F2; 30 = 7.45, p = 0.01), while following the Bimanual program a significant difference was noted only in the less-affected hand (F2; 16 = 6.02, p < 0.01].

    Conclusion:

    Both interventions Hybrid and Bimanual were similarly effective for improving use of the affected hand in bimanual tasks. The unique contribution of each intervention, the Hybrid program on the affected and the Bimanual on the less-affected side, warrants further examination.

  • 2.
    Ryll, Ulrike C.
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bastiaenen, Carolien H. G.
    Caphri Research Institute, Program Functioning and Rehabilitation, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    To Explore the Validity of Change Scores of the Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ) in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy2019In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 168-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To explore the validity of change scores of the Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ).

    METHODS: Analysis of the CHEQ included 44 children (15 girls) between 6-16 years (median 9.0; IQR 8-11) with unilateral cerebral palsy, with baseline and post- (two-week intensive) intervention assessments using the Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) as external anchor for change. Hypotheses on the magnitude of expected change were formulated and correlation coefficients and effect sizes calculated. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to investigate the ability of CHEQ to discriminate between improvement and non-improvement according to GAS.

    RESULTS: All hypotheses about the magnitude of change were confirmed supporting longitudinal validity of CHEQ scales to measure change in the perception of bimanual performance. AUCs for the Grasp efficacy and the Time utilization were slightly below, and for the Feeling bothered slightly above the threshold. The latter one accurately discriminating between children that improved and did not improve according to the GAS.

    CONCLUSIONS: Evidence was found that CHEQ scales capture change in bimanual performance but with limited accuracy for two out of three scales. The validity of CHEQ change scores needs to be further explored in a wider population.

  • 3.
    Taylor, Susan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    McCutcheon, Sara
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    McLean, Belinda
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Jacoby, Peter
    Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.
    Carey, Leeanne
    School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Elliott, Catherine
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Haptic exploratory procedures of children and youth with and without cerebral palsy2019In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 337-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Compare haptic exploratory procedures (EPs) and exploratory movements (EMs) of children. This study also tested the interrater reliability of a novel digital recording method.

    Methods: Participants were 31 children with typical development (TD) (aged 6 years 1 month to 15 years 9 months; 14 male) and 23 children with spastic unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) (aged 6 years to 15 years 5 months; 13 males; right hemiplegia, n = 12).

    Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups for expected EP (p =.15), additional EPs (p =.78), or EMs (p =.69) but there was for mean duration of exploration (p <.001) and accuracy (p <.001). This suggests that although children with CP performed similar haptic EPs for each object as children with TD, they took more time and were less accurate in their identification. There was substantial agreement between the two raters' observations of expected EP, κ =.64, p <.0005.

    Conclusion: Children with CP performed similar haptic EPs as their TD peers. However, despite similarities, the results indicate that for children with CP manual ability was not the primary determinant of accuracy or speed of identification. This study provides evidence for a reliable method of recording haptic EPs. 

  • 4. Wilson, B. N.
    et al.
    Crawford, S. G.
    Green, Dido
    Guy’s & St Thomas’ Foundation Trust & Kings College London Biomedical Research Centre, Strand, London, UK.
    Roberts, G.
    Aylott, A.
    Kaplan, B. J.
    Psychometric properties of the revised Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire2009In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 184-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) is a parent-completed measure designed to identify subtle motor problems in children of 8 to 14.6 years of age. The purpose of this study was to extend the lower age range to children aged 5 to 7 years, revise items to ensure clarity, develop new scoring, and evaluate validity of the revised questionnaire. Additional items with improved wording were generated by an expert panel. Analyses of internal consistency, factor loading, and qualitative/quantitative feedback from researchers, clinicians, and parents were used to select 15 items with the strongest psychometric properties. Internal consistency was high (alpha = .94). The expanded questionnaire was completed by the parents of 287 children, aged 5-15 years, who were typically developing. Logistic regression modeling was used to generate separate cutoff scores for three age groups (overall sensitivity = 85%, specificity = 71%). The revised DCDQ was then compared to other standardized measures in a sample of 232 children referred for therapy services. Differences in scores between children with and without DCD (p < .001) provide evidence of construct validity. Correlations between DCDQ scores and Movement Assessment Battery for Children (r = .55) and Test of Visual-Motor Integration (r = .42) scores support concurrent validity. The results provide evidence that the revised DCDQ is a valid clinical screening tool for DCD.

  • 5.
    Åström, Frida Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Khetani, Mary
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure: Swedish Cultural Adaptation2018In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 329-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To culturally adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM) for use by caregivers of Swedish children with and without disabilities, aged 2–5 years.

    Methods: Thirteen cognitive interviews and two focus groups with caregivers of children with and without disabilities were conducted to evaluate the cultural relevance of YC-PEM content for use in Sweden. Per participant feedback, a revised version of the Swedish YC-PEM was created and pilot tested with caregivers of children with disabilities (n = 11) and children with typical development (n = 22).

    Results: User feedback informed content revisions to 7% of items. Internal consistency estimates of the Swedish YC-PEM pilot version were acceptable and ranged from .70 to .92 for all but two of the YC-PEM scales. Mean percentage agreement between raters ranged from 47% to 93% across YC-PEM scales for inter-rater, and 44% to 86% for test-retest. One of twelve YC-PEM scales revealed significant group differences between young children with and without disabilities.

    Conclusions: This study contributes preliminary evidence for the use of some scales within a culturally adapted YC-PEM in Sweden. Further validation with larger samples will allow for parametric testing to evaluate its psychometric properties.

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