Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Head, Jenny
    University College London.
    Short- and long-term effects of major organisational change on minor psychiatric disorder and self-rated health: Results from the Whitehall II study2013In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 70, no 10, p. 688-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate short- and long-term effects of major organisational change on minor psychiatric disorder and self-rated health for women and men in different employment grades.

    Methods Minor psychiatric disorder and self-rated health among 6710 British civil servants (1993 women and 4717 men) in three employment grades from the Whitehall II study were examined from 1985 to 1988 under stable employment conditions. The short-term effects of organisational change were investigated in 1991–1993 after a time of major restructuring aiming at increasing the influence of market forces in the civil service and the long-term effects were investigated in 1997–1999.

    Results Those who had experienced organisational change and those who anticipated organisational change reported more negative short-term health effects (minor psychiatric disorder and poor self-rated health) compared with those who reported no change. No major differences were found depending on employment grade or gender. The negative health effects had diminished during 1997–1999 for those who reported that a major change had happened before 1991–1993. Those who anticipated an organisational change in 1991–1993 still reported more ill-health in 1997–1999 (both minor psychiatric disorder and self-reported health) than those in the comparison group.

    Conclusions The results indicate that organisational change affects employees’ health negatively in the short term but also that it is possible to recover from such negative effects. As it was not possible to discern any definite difference between the gender and grades, the results point at the importance of working proactively to implement organisational change for women and men at all levels.

  • 2.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Uppsala University.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot and the risk of atrial fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF study2016In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 73, no Suppl 1, p. 140-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation is a common heart rhythm disorder affecting 1-3% of the adult population. Despite being such a prevalent disorder, the knowledge about risk factors preceding the disease is very limited, especially regarding work related factors. The aim of the present study was to estimate the association between the 310 exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot in the work environment and the risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Method

    Data from the Swedish Work, Lipids and Fibrinogen (WOLF) study was used. The study includes working men and women in the counties of Stockholm, Västernorrland and Jämtland (n=10416). The baseline data collection was carried out 1992-1998. Atrial fibrillation cases were identified by the Swedish national hospital discharge register.

    Results

    During a median follow-up time of 13.6 years, 252 incident cases with atrial fibrillation were identified. In total, 1249 (12.5%) people reported exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot at baseline. The age and sex adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for atrial fibrillation was 1.01 (95% CI 0.70-1.46) for the exposed group compared with the unexposed group. Further adjustment for socio-economic status, lifestyle factors, job strain, waist circumference and hypertension did not alter the estimated HR in any substantial way (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.66-1.48). However, when combining the exposure with smoking status, an increased risk for atrial fibrillation was observed among those exposed both to smoking and exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot compared to non-smokers who were not exposed (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.07-3.12).

    Exposure-Smoking status   HR*    95% CI

    Non exposed-Non-smoker   1         -

    Non exposed-Smoker         1.09   0.78-1.52

    Exposed-Non-smoker         0.69    0.40-1.19

    Exposed-Smoker               1.83   1.07-3.12

    *Adjusted for SES, life-style, job strain, waist circumference and hypertension

    Conclusion

    Preliminary results indicate that exposure to exhaust fumes, combustion products or soot in combination with smoking is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation.

  • 3.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Department of Psychology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Information and communication technology stress at work and development of suboptimal self-rated health2016In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 73, no Suppl. 1, p. A150-A151, article id P091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Information and communication technology (ICT) stress is a new type of work-related stress, which is common in modern working life. The prospective association between ICT stress and health have not previously been examined, to the best of our knowledge. The aim of this study was to examine the prospective association between exposure of ICT stress and development of suboptimal self-rated health, including potential differences in this association due to sex or socioeconomic status (SES).

    Methods A prospective design was applied, utilising data from three waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). The analytical sample comprised 4468 gainfully employed people (1941 men, 2527 women, mean age 47.3 years) with good self-rated health at baseline. ICT stress was measured at two points of time, two years apart, and self-rated health was measured at follow-up two years later. Logistic regression analyses were used to derive odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

    Results In the total study sample, exposure of ICT stress at two points of time was associated with suboptimal self-rated health at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI: 1.06–1.70], adjusted for age, sex, SES, lifestyle, BMI, job strain and social support). This association was stronger in men (OR 1.53 [CI: 1.09–2.16]) than in women (OR 1.17 [CI: 0.85–1.62]). Regarding SES, ICT stress exposure at two point of time was more prevalent in participants with high SES, but in the multivariable adjusted analyses, the strongest association between ICT stress and suboptimal self-rated health was observed among participants with low SES (OR 1.67 [CI: 1.04–2.66]), adjusted for age, sex, SES, lifestyle, BMI, job strain and social support).

    Conclusion Exposure of ICT stress at two point of time was associated with increased risk of developing suboptimal self-rated health during follow-up, especially among men and in low SES groups.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf