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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Pless, Mia
    Exploring changes over time in habilitation professionals' perceptions and applications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for children and youth (ICF-CY)2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 670-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:This study explored how professionals in interdisciplinary teams perceived the implementation of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) in Swedish habilitation services.

    Design:Descriptive longitudinal mixed-methods design.

    Methods:Following participation in a 2-day in-service training on the ICF-CY, 113 professionals from 14 interdisciplinary teams described their perceptions of the implementation of the ICF-CY at 3 consecutive time-points: during in-service training, after 1 year, and after 2.5 years.

    Results:Implementation of the ICF-CY in daily work focused on assessment and habilitation planning and required adaptations of routines and materials. The ICF-CY was perceived as useful in supporting analyses and in communication about children’s needs. Professionals also perceived it as contributing to new perspectives on problems and a sharpened focus on participation.

    Conclusion:Professionals indicated that the ICF-CY enhanced their awareness of families’ views of child participation, which corresponded to organizational goals for habilitation services. An implementation finding was a lack of tools fitting the comprehensive ICF-CY perspective. The study points to the need for ICF-CY-based assessment and intervention methods focusing on child participation.

  • 2.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Quality of Life among Swedish Patients after Stroke: Psychometric Evaluation of SF-362009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    DESIGN: Structured interview study.

    SUBJECTS: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    METHODS: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    RESULTS: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cronbach’s alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations > 0.5 (mean = 0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% > 0.5 (mean = 0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% > 0.5 (mean = 0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    CONCLUSION: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 4.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bedics, Beate Kärrdahl
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries: A 10-year follow-up2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and design: Long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries were investigated based on a 10-year follow-up of patients from a previously published randomized controlled study of mild traumatic brain injuries. One aim was to describe changes over time after mild traumatic brain injuries in terms of the extent of persisting post-concussion symptoms, life satisfaction, perceived health, activities of daily living, changes in life roles and sick leave. Another aim was to identify differences between the intervention and control groups.

    Patients: The intervention group comprised 142 persons and the control group 56 persons.

    Methods: Postal questionnaires with a response rate of 56%.

    Results: No differences over time were found for the intervention and control groups in terms of post-concussion symptoms. In the intervention group some variables in life satisfaction, perceived health and daily life were decreased. Some roles had changed over the years for both groups. No other differences between the intervention and control groups were found. However, in both groups sick leave decreased.

    Conclusion: Early individual intervention by a qualified rehabilitation team does not appear to impact on the long-term outcome for persons with symptoms related to mild traumatic brain injuries. The status after approximately 3 weeks is indicative of the status after 10 years.

     

     

  • 5.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Emanuelson, Ingrid
    Olsson, Margareta
    Stålhammar, Daniel
    Starmark, Jan-Erik
    The new Swedish Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire: a measure of symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury and its concurrent validity and inter-rater reliability2006In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 26-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:To study the concurrent validity and the inter-rater reliability of the Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire. DESIGN:The approach was to study the concurrent validity of the Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire when used as an interview questionnaire compared with a self-report questionnaire administered by the patients. The inter-rater reliability was also studied when 2 different raters administered the Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire interview. PATIENTS: Thirty-five patients with mild traumatic brain injury were consecutively contacted by telephone and asked whether they would be willing to participate in a follow-up intervention. METHODS: The Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire was completed by the patients, who answered "Yes" or "No" to the standardized questions. The patients were then interviewed to check the certain "Yes" or "No" answers, 0-10 days after having completed the first Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire. The raters filled in their ratings independently. RESULTS: The concurrent validity of answers in the questionnaire compared with those in the interview ranged from 82% to 100% agreement. The inter-rater reliability results ranged from 93% to 100% agreement between the raters. CONCLUSION: The Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire with answers of "Yes" or "No" is a valid instrument. High reliability was found between the raters.

  • 6.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Ylvén, Regina
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Utility of international classification of functioning, disability and health's participation dimension in assigning ICF codes to items from extant rating instruments2004In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 130-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Firstly to investigate the utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health's (ICF's) participation dimension when items from extant questionnaires focusing on participation were assigned to ICF codes on an item-by-item basis; and, secondly, to conduct a preliminary investigation of the theoretical assumption expressed in ICF that ICF's environment component interacts with body function and participation components. 

    Design: A person-based, descriptive study. 

    Subjects: The sample comprised students with disabilities (n = 448), their parents/relatives ( n = 414), their teachers/managers (n = 418) and special education consultants (n = 110). 

    Methods: Items from original surveys were used. Participation of students with disabilities: a survey of participation in school activities, The Arc's Self-Determination Scale, Perceived interaction-questionnaire, Environments survey, The Abilities Index. Data were analysed with the help of ANOVA, Scheffe pair-wise comparisons, correlation analysis and cluster analysis. 

    Results: The study partly confirmed the utility of ICF participation dimension in assigning codes to items from extant instruments. Moderate statistical correlations between participation chapters and between items from different ICF dimensions were found. Cluster analysis resulted in groups with participation patterns not related to type of disability. 

    Conclusion: Items from extant instruments can be assigned to ICF participation codes, but further item analyses and a more extensive questionnaire base are needed.

  • 7.
    Klang Ibragimova, Nina
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen university.
    Pless, Mia
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Using content analysis to link texts on assessment and intervention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY)2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 728-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how content analysis can be used together with linking rules to link texts on assessment and intervention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – version for children and youth (ICF-CY).

    Methods: Individual habilitation plans containing texts on assessment and intervention for children with disabilities and their families were linked to the ICF-CY using content analysis. Texts were first divided into meaning units in order to extract meaningful concepts. Meaningful concepts that were difficult to link to ICF-CY codes were grouped, and coding schemes with critical attributes were developed. Meaningful concepts that could not be linked to the ICF-CY were assigned to the categories “not-definable” and “not-covered”, using coding schemes with mutually exclusive categories.

    Results: The size of the meaning units selected resulted in different numbers and contents of meaningful concepts. Coding schemes with critical attributes of ICF-CY codes facilitated the linking of meaningful concepts to the most appropriate ICF-CY codes. Coding schemes with mutually exclusive categories facilitated the classification of meaningful concepts that could or could not be linked to the ICF-CY.

    Conclusion: Content analysis techniques can be applied togetherwith linking rules in order to link texts on assessmentand intervention to the ICF-CY.

  • 8.
    Magnusson, Lina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lunds universitet.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Malawian prosthetic and orthotic users' mobility and satisfaction with their lower limb assistive device2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 385-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients’ mobility and satisfaction with their lower limb prosthetic or orthotic device and related service delivery in Malawi and to compare groups of patients regarding type and level of device and demographics.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were used to collect self-report data from 83 patients.

    RESULTS: Ninety percent of prostheses or orthoses were in use by patients, but approximately half of these needed repair. Thirty-nine percent reported pain when using their assistive device. The majority of patients were able to rise from a chair (77%), move around the home (80%), walk on uneven ground (59%) and travel by bus or car (56%). However, patients had difficulties walking up and down hills (78%) and stairs (60%). In general, patients were quite satisfied with their assistive device (mean of 3.9 out of 5) and very satisfied with the service provided (mean of 4.4 out of 5). Access to repairs and servicing were rated as most important, followed by durability and follow-up services. Lack of finances to pay for transport was a barrier to accessing the prosthetic and orthotic centre.

    CONCLUSION: Patients were satisfied with the assistive device and service received, despite reporting pain associated with use of the device and difficulties ambulating on challenging surfaces.

  • 9.
    Magnusson, Lina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University.
    Mobility and satisfaction with lower-limb prostheses and orthoses among users in Sierra Leone: A cross-sectional study2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate patients' mobility and satisfaction with their lower-limb prosthetic or orthotic device and related service delivery in Sierra Leone; to compare groups of patients regarding type and level of assistive device, gender, area of residence, income; and to identify factors associated with satisfaction with the assistive device and service. Methods: A total of 139 patients answered questionnaires, including the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology questionnaire (QUEST 2.0). Results: Eighty-six percent of assistive devices were in use, but half needed repair. Thirty-three percent of patients reported pain when using their assistive device. Patients had difficulties or could not walk at all on: uneven ground (65%); hills (75%); and stairs (66%). Patients were quite satisfied with their assistive device and the service (mean 3.7 out of 5 in QUEST), but reported 886 problems. Approximately half of the patients could not access services. In relation to mobility and service delivery, women, orthotic patients and patients using above-knee assistive devices had the poorest results. The general condition of the assistive device and patients' ability to walk on uneven ground were associated with satisfaction with the assistive devices and service. Conclusion: Patients reported high levels of mobility while using their device although they experienced pain and difficulties walking on challenging surfaces. Limitations in the effectiveness of assistive devices and limited access to follow-up services and repairs were issues desired to be addressed.

  • 10.
    Nolan, Lee
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    A TRAINING PROGRAMME TO IMPROVE HIP STRENGTH IN PERSONS WITH LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a 10-week training programme on persons with a lower limb amputation and to determine if this training is sufficient to enable running. Subjects: Seven transtibial, 8 transfemoral and 1 bilateral amputee (all resulting from trauma, tumour or congenital) were randomly assigned to a training (n = 8) or control group (n = 8). Methods: Isokinetic hip flexor and extensor strength at 60 and 120 degrees/s and oxygen consumption while walking at 1.0 m/s were tested pre- and post- a 10-week period. The training group followed a twice weekly hip strengthening programme, while the control group continued with their usual activities. Running ability was determined pretesting, and attempted after post-testing for the training group only. Results: The training group increased hip strength and decreased oxygen consumption. Six amputees who were previously unable to run were able to after training. The control group decreased intact limb hip extensor strength. Conclusion: The training programme is sufficient to improve hip strength and enable running in persons with a lower limb amputation. As hip strength was reduced in those not following the training programme, it is recommended that strength training be undertaken regularly in order to avoid losing limb strength following amputation.

  • 11. Nätterlund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Activities of daily living and quality of life in persons with muscular dystrophy.2001In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 206-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study concerns 77 adults with muscular dystrophy (mean age 49 years) in two counties in Sweden. The purpose was to investigate activities of daily living, quality of life and the relationship between these. Data collection was performed with "the Activity of Daily Living Staircase", "the Self-report Activity of Daily Living" and the Quality of Life Profile. The results indicated that over half of the subjects were dependent on others, chiefly in activities requiring mobility. Muscular dystrophy had mostly negative consequences, and nearly half stated that life would have offered more without it. Few significant diagnosis-related (no gender-related) differences emerged regarding activities of daily living and quality of life. Lower quality of life can only partly be explained by greater disability (r=0.30-0.54). Therefore quality of life as a measurement of rehabilitation outcomes might be based both on physical status, disability and psychosocial factors in terms of positive and negative consequences.

  • 12.
    Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala university, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ibragimova, Nina
    Mälardalen university, School of Education, Culture, and Communication.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Evaluation of in-service training in using the ICF and ICF version for children and youth2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 451-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To study the effects of in-service training on staff's self-reported knowledge, understanding use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and ICF Children and Youth version (ICF-CY).

    DESIGN:

    Quasi-experimental with a questionnaire prior to training and another one year after training.

    METHODS:

    Intervention was in-service training in using the ICF and ICF-CY. Subjects were 113 professionals working in habilitation services. Two subgroups were compared: (i) subjects who reported one year after the training that they had used the ICF and ICF-CY in daily practice; and (ii) subjects who had not used these frameworks.

    RESULTS:

    The gender, age, and years of work experience of the members in the subgroups were similar. The professionals who used what they learnt from the training, and who already had knowledge about and a positive attitude to the ICF/ICF-CY prior to the training, were found to benefit most from the training. They also increased their ability to apply it to statements about everyday work. These professionals should focus on increasing their understanding and use of the ICF/ICF-CY in their everyday work and in assessment, while those who have limited prior knowledge of the ICF/ICF-CY should focus on gaining knowledge and understanding the purpose, terms and components of the framework.

    CONCLUSION:

    It is recommended that in-service training in using the ICF and ICF-CY is tailored to different groups of professionals depending on their degree of knowledge of the ICF/ICF-CY.

  • 13. Widar, Marita
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Lars
    Karlsson-Tivenius, Susanne
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Long-term pain conditions after a stroke2002In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to classify and describe the characteristics of different long-term pain conditions after a stroke by clinical examination and pain assessment using the Pain-O-Meter and a Pain questionnaire. Pain was classified as central post-stroke pain (n = 15), nociceptive pain (n = 18), and tension-type headache (n = 10). In 65%, pain onset was within 1-6 months and the pain intensity revealed individual differences. Many pain descriptors was common, some were discriminating as burning in central and cramping in nociceptive pain, and pressing and worrying in headache. More than half with central or nociceptive pain had continuous or almost continuous pain. Cold was the factor mostly increasing the pain in central, physical movements in nociceptive pain, and stress and anxiety in headache. More than one-third had no pain treatment and two-thirds of those with central pain had no or inadequate prescribed pain treatment. The clinical findings support the classification of pain and describe discriminating and common pain characteristics in pain conditions after a stroke.

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