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  • 1.
    Hernandez, Raymond
    et al.
    Dornsife Center for Economic & Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Schneider, Stefan
    Dornsife Center for Economic & Social Research, and Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Spruijt-Metz, Donna
    Dornsife Center for Economic & Social Research, Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA; Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Pyatak, Elizabeth A.
    Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Validity and Reliability of the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ11) in a U.S. Sample of Adults With Type 1 Diabetes2023In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 77, no 4, article id 7704205120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: Although occupational balance (OB) is a construct of importance to occupational therapy, existing OB assessments have not been validated in clinical populations.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the validity and reliability of the 11-item version of the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ11) in U.S. adults with Type 1 diabetes.

    DESIGN: Data were analyzed from adults with Type 1 diabetes enrolled in a larger longitudinal study examining the relationships among blood glucose, emotion, and functioning. Dimensionality of the OBQ11 was assessed with item response theory (IRT); convergent validity was tested by examining whether associations between the OBQ11 and other constructs were consistent with a priori hypotheses.

    SETTING: Three outpatient clinical sites in the United States.

    PARTICIPANTS: Data from 208 U.S. adults with Type 1 diabetes were included in the analyses (42% Latino, 29% White, 14% African American, 7% multiethnic, and 8% other).

    OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Assessments administered include the OBQ11, Patient Health Questionnaire (depression), and Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Overall, results from IRT models and correlational tests supported the reliability and validity of the OBQ11. For instance, higher scores on the OBQ11 were significantly associated with better self-ratings of diabetes management behaviors (r = .28, p < .001), lower depression symptoms (r = -.53, p < .001), and greater positive affect (r = .32, p < .001). A single-factor generalized partial credit model fit the OBQ11 acceptably well, supporting its unidimensionality.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The OBQ11 may be a reliable and valid measure of OB appropriate for use in clinical populations such as adults with diabetes. What This Article Adds: OB is not often formally assessed by occupational therapists in the United States, even though the contributions of OB to health and well-being are core components of the philosophy of occupational therapy. The current evidence supports the validity of the OBQ11 in a clinical population of adults with Type 1 diabetes and demonstrates significant associations between OB and health management behaviors. Study results may encourage greater consideration and assessment of OB in occupational therapy clinical practice in the United States.

  • 2.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Roshanay, Afsaneh Hayat
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    White, Suzanne
    State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, USA.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pilot Study of Let's Get Organized: A Group Intervention for Improving Time Management2019In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 7305205020p1-7305205020p10, article id 7305205020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: There is a need for evidence-based occupational therapy interventions to enhance time management in people with time management difficulties.

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot test the first part of the Let's Get Organized (LGO) occupational therapy intervention in a Swedish context by exploring enhancements of time management skills, aspects of executive functioning, and satisfaction with daily occupations in people with time management difficulties because of neurodevelopmental or mental disorders.

    DESIGN: One-group pretest-posttest design with 3-mo follow-up.

    SETTING: Outpatient psychiatric and habilitation settings.

    PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-five people with confirmed or suspected mental or neurodevelopmental disorder and self-reported difficulties with time management in daily life.

    INTERVENTION: Swedish version of Let's Get Organized (LGO-S) Part 1, with structured training in the use of cognitive assistive techniques and strategies using trial-and-error learning strategies in 10 weekly group sessions of 1.5 hr.

    OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Time management, organization and planning, and emotional regulation were measured with the Swedish version of the Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S). Executive functioning was measured with the Swedish version of the Weekly Calendar Planning Activity, and satisfaction with daily occupations was assessed with the Satisfaction With Daily Occupations measure.

    RESULTS: Participants displayed significantly improved time management, organization and planning skills, and emotional regulation, as well as satisfaction with daily occupations. Aspects of executive functioning were partly improved. ATMS-S results were sustained at 3-mo follow-up.

    CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: LGO-S Part 1 is a promising intervention for improving time management skills and satisfaction with daily occupations and should be investigated further.

    WHAT THIS ARTICLE ADDS: This study shows that LGO-S Part 1 is feasible for use in psychiatric and habilitation outpatient services. The results are promising for improved time management skills, organization and planning skills, and satisfaction with daily occupations and need to be confirmed in further studies.

  • 3.
    Robinson-Bert, Krystal
    et al.
    Messiah College, Dillsburg, PA, USA.
    Rutt, Leanne
    Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA, USA.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Occupational Balance and Quality of Life of OT Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic2021In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, no Supplement 2, article id 7512505165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study demonstrates how the quality of life and occupational balance of graduate OT students were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It also highlights students’ perception of how the experience will affect their future practice. The understanding of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on student wellness allows program faculty to best support OT students and prepares educators for future disasters and crises.

  • 4.
    White, Suzanne Marie
    et al.
    Alithia D Alleyne, Brooklyn, NY USA..
    Holmefur, Marie
    Orebro Univ, Orebro, Sweden..
    Janeslatt, Gunnel
    Uppsala Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    Roshanay, Afsaneh
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmqvist, Kajsa Lidstroem
    Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Let's Get Organized: A Group Intervention for Improving Time Management-A Pilot Study2021In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, article id 106137Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Wingren, Maria
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Orebro, Sweden..
    Holmqvist, Kajsa Lidstroem
    Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Roshanai, Afsaneh
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Janeslott, Gunnel
    Uppsala Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    White, Suzanne Marie
    SUNY Downstate Hlth Sci Univ, Brooklyn, NY USA..
    Holmefur, Marie
    Orebro Univ, Orebro, Sweden..
    Improved Time Management Skills After the Intervention Let's Get Organized Are Maintained Over Time2021In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 75, article id 106137Article in journal (Refereed)
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