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  • 1.
    Larsen, Louise B.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, PO Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police: associations with discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and prolonged sitting2018In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 425--433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Musculoskeletal disorders are considered as a major issue affecting the health and well-being of active duty police. Discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and sitting for long periods of time in fleet vehicles are workload factors linked to musculoskeletal disorders in police. This study aims to determine the prevalence of multi-site musculoskeletal pain among Swedish police and to explore the possible association to discomfort experience when wearing mandatory equipment and sitting for long periods in fleet vehicles.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study responses from 4185 police were collected through a self-administered online survey including questions about physical work environment, mandatory equipment and musculoskeletal pain. Multi-site pain was determined through summing pain sites from four body regions. Binomial logistic regression was performed to explore the association between multi-site musculoskeletal pain: (1) discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and (2) sitting for long periods in fleet vehicles.

    Results: The prevalence of multi-site musculoskeletal pain at least 1 day per week within the previous 3 months was 41.3%. A statistically significant association between discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and multi-site musculoskeletal pain was found; duty belt [OR 5.42 (95% CI 4.56–6.43)] as well as body armour [OR 2.69 (95% CI 2.11–3.42)]. Sitting for long periods in fleet vehicles was not significantly associated to multi-site musculoskeletal pain.

    Conclusion: Multi-site musculoskeletal pain is a considerable problem among Swedish police and modifying mandatory equipment to decrease discomfort is suggested as a potential means of decreasing the musculoskeletal pain experienced by many police officers. 

  • 2.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany .
    Dragano, Nico
    Department of Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany .
    Nyberg, Solja
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland .
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Department of Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany .
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Erbel, Raimund
    Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany .
    Fahlén, Göran
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools, Härnösand, Sweden .
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Versailles-Saint Quentin University, Versailles, France; Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France .
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany .
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schupp, Jürgen
    German Institute for Economic Research, Berlin, Germany.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK; Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Wagner, Gert
    German Institute for Economic Research, Berlin, Germany; Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zins, Marie
    Versailles-Saint Quentin University, Versailles, France; Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France .
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT. Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Validating abbreviated measures of effort-reward imbalance at work in European cohort studies: The IPD-Work consortium2014In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Effort-reward imbalance (ERI) is an established conceptualisation of work stress. Although a validated effort-reward questionnaire is available for public use, many epidemiological studies adopt shortened scales and proxy measures. To examine the agreement between different abbreviated measures and the original instrument, we compared different versions of the effort-reward scales available in 15 European cohort studies participating in the IPD-Work (Individual-participant-data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium.

    Methods: Five of the 15 studies provide information on the original (‘complete’) scales measuring ‘effort’ and ‘reward’, whereas the 10 remaining studies used ‘partial’ scales. To compare different versions of the ERI scales, we analyse individual-level data from 31,790 participants from the five studies with complete scales.

    Results: Pearson’s correlation between partial and complete scales was very high in case of ‘effort’ (where 2 out of 3 items were used) and very high or high in case of ‘reward’, if at least 4 items (out of 7) were included. Reward scales composed of 3 items revealed good to satisfactory agreement, and in one case, a reward scale consisting of 2 items only demonstrated a modest, but still acceptable degree of agreement. Sensitivity and specificity of a composite measure, the ratio of effort and reward, comparing partial versus complete scales ranged between 59–93 and 85–99 %, respectively. Complete and partial scales were strongly associated with poor self-rated health.

    Conclusion: Our results support the notion that short proxy measures or partial versions of the original scales can be used to assess effort-reward imbalance.

  • 3.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Information and communication technology demands at work: the association with job strain, effort-reward imbalance and self-rated health in different socio-economic strata2016In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 7, p. 1049-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is common in modern working life. ICT demands may give rise to experience of work-related stress. Knowledge about ICT demands in relation to other types of work-related stress and to self-rated health is limited. Consequently, the aim of this study was to examine the association between ICT demands and two types of work-related stress [job strain and effort-reward imbalance (ERI)] and to evaluate the association between these work-related stress measures and self-rated health, in general and in different SES strata.

    METHODS: This study is based on cross-sectional data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health collected in 2014, from 14,873 gainfully employed people. ICT demands, job strain, ERI and self-rated health were analysed as the main measures. Sex, age, SES, lifestyle factors and BMI were used as covariates.

    RESULTS: ICT demands correlated significantly with the dimensions of the job strain and ERI models, especially with the demands (r = 0.42; p < 0.01) and effort (r = 0.51; p < 0.01) dimensions. ICT demands were associated with suboptimal self-rated health, also after adjustment for age, sex, SES, lifestyle and BMI (OR 1.49 [95 % CI 1.36-1.63]), but job strain (OR 1.93 [95 % CI 1.74-2.14) and ERI (OR 2.15 [95 % CI 1.95-2.35]) showed somewhat stronger associations with suboptimal self-rated health.

    CONCLUSION: ICT demands are common among people with intermediate and high SES and associated with job strain, ERI and suboptimal self-rated health. ICT demands should thus be acknowledged as a potential stressor of work-related stress in modern working life.

  • 4.
    Stadin, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study2019In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 717-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The knowledge about the association between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) demands at work and self-rated health (SRH) is insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the association between repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and risk of suboptimal SRH, and to determine modifications by sex or socioeconomic position (SEP).

    Methods

    A prospective design was used, including repeated measurement of ICT demands at work, measured 2 years apart. SRH was measured at baseline and at follow-up after 4 years. The data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), including 4468 gainfully employees (1941 men, 2527 women) with good SRH at baseline.

    Results

    In the total study sample, repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI 1.06–1.70]), adjusted for age, sex, SEP, health behaviours, BMI, job strain and social support. An interaction between ICT demands and sex was observed (p = 0.010). The risk was only present in men (OR 1.53 [CI 1.09–2.16]), and not in women (OR 1.17 [CI 0.85–1.62]). The risk of suboptimal SRH after consistently high ICT demands at work was most elevated in participants with high SEP (OR 1.68 [CI 1.02–2.79]), adjusted for age, sex, health behaviours, BMI and job strain. However, no significant interaction between ICT demands and SEP regarding SRH was observed.

    Conclusion

    Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up, and the association was modified by sex.

1 - 4 of 4
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